MANCHESTER BOROUGH POLICE FORCE FOURTH PART JAN 1847 - DEC 1849

 

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MANCHESTER FAMILY HISTORY RESEARCH

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CONTENTS

HOMEPAGE

A  MANCHESTER RESEARCHER'S TALE

MANCHESTER AND STOCKPORT CERTIFIED INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS

MANCHESTER COURT RECORDS

BELLE VUE PRISON RECORDS

NEW BAILEY PRISON RECORDS

STRANGEWAYS PRISON RECORDS

STRANGEWAYS PRISON: FIRST REPORTS

MANCHESTER MARTYRS' PRISON RECORDS

PRESS REACTION TO THE MANCHESTER EXECUTIONS PART I

PART II

PART III

WHAT  DID HAPPEN TO THE REMAINS OF THE PRISONERS EXECUTED AT MANCHESTER?

THE MANCHESTER FELONY REGISTER PT 1

PART 2

PART 3

PART 4

GREATER MANCHESTER RIOTS IN 1868

MANCHESTER AND LANCASHIRE STRAYS IN MILL BANK PRISON

MANCHESTER POOR LAW AND WORKHOUSE RECORDS

MANCHESTER POOR LAW UNION MINUTES

CHORLTON AND SOUTH MANCHESTER REGISTRATION DISTRICT

VOTING REGISTERS AND ELIGIBILITY IN MANCHESTER

1831 POPULATION FIGURES FOR MANCHESTER

MANCHESTER CENSUS COLLECTION DETAILS

PLACES OF WORSHIP IN MANCHESTER AND SALFORD

MANCHESTER PARISH AND CITY

MANCHESTER CITY CENTRE CHURCHES

MANCHESTER AND GENERAL INFORMATION

MANCHESTER BOROUGH POLICE FORCE

SECOND PART

THIRD PART

FOURTH PART

MANCHESTER INQUEST WITNESS STATEMENT INDEX

TRANSPORT IN MANCHESTER PART ONE

PART TWO

USEFUL LINKS

MANCHESTER FAMILY HISTORY CONTACT PAGE

   

 

 

MANCHESTER BOROUGH POLICE FORCE

FOURTH PART JAN 1847 - DEC 1849

FIND MY PAST

 

Meeting 7th January 1847

Resolved


That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:


Charles Brett***

John Carter

Henry Hurst

Richard Lalor

Ralph Beresford

John Dobson

Charles Godby

James McNally

John Gibbon

James Nolan

Thomas Curtis

John Taylor

Thomas Thomas


 

***Charles Brett was the first Manchester Policeman to be murdered whilst on duty in 1867. He death occurred during the attack on the the police van by the Fenians. See here.


POLICE LIBRARY


Resolved

That a library be established for the advantage of the the Police Officers and Constables of the Police Force the expense to be defrayed out of the Fine Fund and by private contribution.


Meeting 21st January 1847


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

Thomas Greenwood, Joseph Hulmes, John Eyles, Thomas Whittaker Gleave, Richard Grundy and Thomas Downing.


Memorandum

Letter for Mr Ralph Lomas, proprietor of Hackney Carriages, dated 20th inst, complaining of non interference of the two police Constables who were requested to assist him in obtaining a fare from a party who refused to pay, and requesting information whether or not Police are authorised to interfere in such cases.


Resolved

That the above letter be acknowledge and the same referred to the Town Clerk to answer the enquiry.


Meeting 28th January 1847


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

Thomas McNulty Richard Jebb John Woodley Charles Barker.


Nuisances

Memorandum

Extract from the minutes of the Nuisance Committee's proceedings 20th inst.

That with the assistance now rendered by the Police in this Department, it appears unnecessary to this Committee to retain more than four Nuisance Inspectors as a permanent staff, one for each of the Nuisance Divisions.


Meeting 4th February 1847

Resolved

That under the directions of the Chief Constable the offices of Superintendents Leary and Taylor be furnished with a few chairs and the floors covered with matting.


Resolved

That under the directions of the Clothing sub Committee tenders be obtained and orders given for the supply of clothing for the Police Force to be issued on the 1st May next.


Meeting 11th February 1847


Memorandum

Extract from the minutes of the Public Parks Committee proceedings on 5th February inst.

That the Watch Committee be requested to swear in as Constables the park keepers at each of the parks in accordance with the recommendations of this Committee, approved of and adopted by the Council on 22nd September last.


Resolved

The the park keepers be directed to attend the next meeting of this Committee, for the purpose of being sworn in as Police Constables.


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

Edward Bookcock, William Armison, Robert Mills, William Tarbuck, John Vernon, Charles Spedding, Zadock Tonge and William Wood.


Meeting 18th February 1847


Memorandum

The following parties being employed at the two parks:

Queen's Park ; James McBain, Samuel Rees, George Twigge, Joseph Whittaker.

Philips' Park; Jeremiah Harrison, John Davies, John, Chadwick, Rowland Winterbottom appeared before the Committee and were sworn in as Constables.


Resolved

That William Hayes having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Police Constable.


Meeting 4th March 1847

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables:

George Jervis Mansfield, William Kennedy, John Olive, John Jackson, William Pease.


Meeting 11th February 1847

Resolved

That Police Constable Patrick Stewart having discharged the duty of Coroner's Officer to the satisfaction of the Chief Constable, is hereby appointed the rank of Sub-Inspector at the wages of 25/- per week.

Resolved

That the Chief Constable is hereby authorised to dispose of by public auction the unclaimed and forfeited property now in the Police Stores.


Meeting 18th March 1847

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: Michael Berry, Thomas Smith and Benjamin Gibson.


Memorandum

The Chairman of the Public Parks Committee applied on behalf of that committee for the assistance of two Police Constables at each of the parks on Saturday afternoons and Sundays for a few weeks, and also on Wednesday next the public feast day.


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be authorised to give further assistance at the public parks during the Saturday afternoons and Sundays, and on any pubic holidays.

Criminal and Statistical Returns Report by Chief Constable

In presenting the Police Returns for the year 1846, I have much pleasure in being able to give a satisfactory report of the diminution and prevention of crime and offences of a disorderly character within the Borough as well as of the improved and I may add continually improving conduct and efficiency of the Police.

In regard to the number of cases of felony sent for trial to the Sessions and the Assizes during the year, (and which are generally considered to be the cases indicating the amount of crimes) it is remarkable that the largest number of committals should have occurred during the most prosperous period of the year, thereby showing how uncertain is the operation of those causes which have often been assigned as influencing the increase or decrease of offences.

It will be seen from the following table that during the past year the greatest numbers of persons was committed for trial prior to the Sessions holden in February, that the number of committals diminished materially until the Sessions held in January in the present year notwithstanding the period from October to January last was one of great distress and privation to the poorer classes , and from January to February 1846, a time of comparative prosperity.


Date of Sessions

No of persons tried for felony

No of persons tried for misdemeanours

Total

Date of Assizes

No of persons tried for felony

1846 Feb 23rd

123

11

134

1846 Mar 21st

17

1846 Apl 6th

54

3

57

1846 Aug 15th

25

1846 May 18th

54

2

56

1846 Dec 7th

5

1846 June 29th

38

10

48



1846 Aug 26th

60

7

67



1846 Oct 19th

93

10

103



1846 Nov 30th

89

8

97




The same results also appear in considering the number of Assize cases. It will be seen that seventeen cases were sent from the Borough for trial at the Assizes held in March, - 25 at the Assizes held in August, - and only 5 at the Assizes which took place in December last.

It thus appears that to both the Sessions and Assizes we have had fewer persons committed for trial during periods of extreme distress than during the early portion of the past year. At the recent Sessions held in January last although the case were not so numerous as at the Sessions in February 1846; again showing how difficult it is to account for the fluctuations seen in the amount of crime.

The number of apprehensions during the past year has been less by upwards of 2000 than in the year 1845, and about 6000 less than the years 1841 and 1842. From the first foundations of the Police Force in 1839 up to year 1842 the number of apprehensions had been continually and considerably on the increase, whilst from that period and up to the present time the number has been constantly diminishing. Considering that the population of the Borough has during the same period been rapidly increasing to an amount to about 300,000 persons, being as increase since the Census of 1841 of about 64,000 persons, it is certainly a remarkable fact that there should have been so great a reduction in the number of apprehensions. It may possibly be urged with some reason that the good state of trade which existed during the years 1843, 1844 and 1845, together with an improved state of education among the poorer classes has contributed in some degree to diminish crime , and as the necessary consequence , the number of apprehensions. I feel however convinced that it is not to any such causes that we must refer the great reduction which has already and is still annually taking place.

The returns now presented will show that during the latter portion of the past year, and especially during the last three months when trade has been exceedingly expressed and great privations have had to be borne by the working classes in consequence not only of the shortness of work and consequent diminutions of wages, but also the high price of all sorts of provisions, the apprehensions have been fewer than they have been during any three months since the Police Force was first established in the year 1839, and during the same period the Borough has been in as quiet a state and freer from every description of crime than it has ever been known, or shown to have been by any Police returns which have been published.

I am aware that the testimony in favour of the Police from one so deeply interested in the efficiency, character, and welfare of the body to which he is attached may and ought to be received with caution, but referring with confidence to the returns which I have the honour to present in support of my opinions. I will venture to assign asa reason for the great reduction in the number of apprehensions the improved state of efficiency of the Police which has mainly resulted from the great care and zeal shown by all the Officers in instructing and controlling the Police in the exercise of their powers. Attention has has been specially drawn to this subject in consequence of the great power which the Borough Police Act has conferred upon the Constables.

Acting upon the principle that the power of apprehension for many offences has been given to Constables in order to ensure that offending parties shall be brought before a Justice it has been deemed expedient to instruct the Constables in all cases of trivial offences (of which there are a large class) and when the offences have been apparently committed through thoughtlessness or neglect to take the name of the offenders and to summon them before the Court instead of taking them into custody , when in default of finding bail they would have to be locked up. It has also been an instruction to the Constables in cases of disputes and quarrels between the inhabitants, and when actual fighting has not been resorted to, or a breach of the peace committed rather to attempt a reconciliation between the parties than to resort to the exercise of their legal powers.

By adopting such a conciliatory course of conduct many unnecessary apprehensions have been prevented, order has been established and maintained and a better and more kindly feeling has been induced without any compromise of duty between the inhabitants and the Police Force.

The system of having superior and intelligent officers always on duty at the stations has also had a most beneficial effect in deterring the Constables from making apprehensions without proper caution and discernment, as they are aware that such Officers are held responsible for strictly enquiring into the nature of every charge before any person is placed in confinement.

The Constables also being all able to read and write and generally better educated than was formerly the case has also contributed materially to the advancement of good order and the attainment and maintenance of a higher moral feeling and consequently to greater discrimination in the performance of their duties throughout the Force.

The class of offences which have been most on the decrease during the year are larcenies from the person and other thefts of a miscellaneous character, gambling, drunken and disorderly cases, vagrancy by reputed thieves and suspicious characters loitering about to commit felonies, and assaults on the Police. There has been an increase in common assaults, bigamy, desertion from the army (more deserters have been apprehended than in former years), and also a slight increase in attempts to break into dwelling houses and warehouses although the actual number of burglaries committed there has been a corresponding decrease. These particulars will be seen either in Table No 1 or in Table 16 [not reproduced here] which gives a comparative statement of the number of apprehensions which have been made according to the offences which been annually committed from the commencement of the year 1840 to the termination of the year 1846.

As respects the discharges and summary convictions, a reference to Table 24 will show that the proportion of discharges to the number of apprehensions has been considerably less in former years, and the summary convictions and committals for trial proportionally greater thereby affording the best possible evidence that discretion and judgement have been exhibited both by the Police Constable in apprehending and the officers in charge of the stations in receiving the charges.

It will be observed in referring to the Table No 7 that more than one half of the persons who been apprehended during the year are stated to have been out of work. As however this return shows the gross number of apprehensions including individuals who have been several times taken in custody and who are generally out of work will not be quite so great as appears in the return, as the separate apprehensions swell the numbers.

Table No 9 shows that the most numerous class of offenders are between the age of 20 and 25 years; the next between 25 years and 30 years; and the third between 15 and 20 years of age; here is also a class of juvenile offenders amounting to about 300 in number whose ages average from 10 to 15 years and against one of this number and another young person of about 17 years of age the most serious charge that occurred during the year, viz, that of murder was preferred.

As regards to the degree of instruction of the person who have been committed for trial and convicted, it will be seen on reference to Table 14, that out of 527 persons so circumstanced 210 could neither read and write, 285 were only able to read and write imperfectly, 28 could read and write well and 4 were of superior education. The information contained in this return has been obtained from the prison calendars and may be relied upon for its correctness, as the education of all prisoners is specially enquired into by the chaplain of the prison.

Table 17 refers to the number of apprehensions which have been made in each in each month for seven successive years, and it will be observed in the same Table that the tuber of persons who have been taken into custody during the summer months is greater than during the winter months when it is supposed by many that more offences take place.

The next table to which I would draw your attention to, numbered 19 contains a return of all the felonies, where money or any property of any description has been stolen; which have been reported to the Police, or of which they have received information together with a statement of the time or period of day or night when the felonies were ascertained to have been committed. This return shows that between the hours of 6 o'clock in the morning and 5 o'clock in the afternoon, being the period when the smallest number of Constables are on duty, the greatest number of felonies have occurred.; that between the hours of 5 o'clock in the afternoon and 9 o'clock at night when the number of Police on duty is considerably increased the number of felonies is considerably diminished, and that between the hours of 9 o'clock at night and 6 o'clock in the morning when the greatest number of the Police are on duty the smallest number of felonies has been committed, or if the periods or day and night duty are taken respectively, viz, from 6 o'clock in the morning until 9 o'clock at night , and from 9 o'clock at night until 6 o'clock in the morning when the Police Force is nearly distributed in the proportion of one third for day and two thirds for night duty, the amount of property stolen during each period will appear to be in proportion to the protection afforded, viz, £2 stolen by day, and £1 by night.

Although these results tend to show that in proportion to the amount of protection or numbers of the Police on duty whether by day or night, and the offences more or less numerous, this cannot be advanced as an argument for the number of men for day duty to the number which are on night duty, as the facilities which are afforded by day for the commission of a numerous class of felonies are much greater than by night and the felonies are frequently of a character beyond the control of the Police. The purloining of goods from a warehouse and shops by parties employed therin are offences which only could be effected by day when the goods or property are exposed, and the opportunity afforded to persons so employed to secrete them, and in such cases and others of a similar character the Police however vigilant could scarcely be expected to prevent the offences being committed, although they might possibly in some instances apprehend the parties when taking the property away under suspicious circumstances.

The total amount of money and property which has been reported to have been stolen during the year appears by the same return to have been about £10,040 being upwards of £3,000 less than was stolen in the previous year, and the sum recovered by the Police upwards of £,6,700 being a large proportion of the amount stolen. The return further shows that rather more than £3,000 which had been accidentally lost by the public has been recovered by the Police and restored to the owners.

In regard to the robberies which have been committed on Sundays during absence of the occupiers of the houses, the returns will show that there has been a considerable decrease both in the number of offences as well as in the amount which has been stolen, as compared with any previous year.

The only remaining tables having reference to the criminal portion of the returns to which it appears necessary to refer, are tables 24, 18 and 21.

The first of these tables gives a statistical account or history of all the prisoners who have been sentenced to transportation during the year, stating their respective age s, the number of times that each has been in custody, the number of times they have been severally been summarily punished under the Vagrant Act or committed for trial, with the period of punishment to which they have been sentenced either by the Magistrates or by the Courts of Session or Assizes prior to their final sentence of transportation.

The second table states in what districts or wards of the Borough the prisoners have been apprehended by the officers of each Division of the Police Force respectively with the results of their several cases.

In regard to the miscellaneous returns it affords me much pleasure to be enabled to state that like the Criminal Returns they will bear favourable comparison with those of the preceding year.

The first Table numbered will show that during the year 2798 premises were found insecure by night; of these 1583 consisted of Warehouse and Lookup Shops containing property in which no person resided and which might and very probably would have been robbed but for the attention of the Police; 800 more consisted of warehouse and shops containing property in which persons did reside which were also liable to be robbed, as the inmates have usually retired to rest prior to the Constables finding premises insecure.

The Returns further show that 4265 children have been reported by their parents or guardians to have been lost in the streets, of whom 2099wre found by the Police and the remainder by their own friends; also that the large sum of £1595

had been taken from persons found drunk in the streets and restored to them when sober, the greater portion of which amount would probably have been stolen but for the care taken of such parties by the Constables.

The next table which relates to the fires which have occurred within the Borough, shows that there has been a decrease of 23 in the number as compared with the previous year and that the amount of property which has been destroyed and which is valued at £23,000 has been less by upward of £33,000 than the sum stated to have been lost in last years return.

The total number of fires has amounted to 114 of which 34 have been extinguished by the Engines and the Firemen, 4 by the Police and Firemen without Engines, 20 by the Police alone, 33 by the Police and neighbours, and 23 by the inhabitants.

The return relating to the complaints have been made against publicans also bears a very satisfactory comparison with the return of the previous year; the complaints being as 114 to 227 or rather less than half, and the amount of penalties as £70 to £174 or about £104 less than the sum stated to have been inflicted as penalties for misconduct in the previous year. It is satisfactory also to observe by the same return that out of 487 public houses which were licensed within the Borough, no reports have been made against 396 of such houses.

The Beer-house returns also shows a considerable improvement in the conduct of the Landlords of this class of houses, as there have been 75 fewer reports as well as a considerable decrease in the amount of penalties inflicted by the Magistrates as compared with the previous year. This return also shows that out of the gross number 1089 Beer-houses 772 have never been reported. The returns show that both as respect to Public Houses and Beer-houses the complaints are chiefly against one class of houses.

With respects to the Table relating to brothels, low-lodgings &c and the class of person who reside therein and over whom it is desirable that the Police should keep a strict watch, it will not be necessary to remark further than to state that the system which has been adopted of classifying and keeping a continually corrected register of the proprietors as well as of the people who inhabit the houses, has tended very materially to check disorder and to aid the Police in detecting crime and bringing offenders to justice.

There are several other tables relating to the administration of the duties of the Police and the preservation of order in the Town amongst the miscellaneous returns to which satisfactory reference might be made, both as to the mode in which the duties have been performed, as also to the result of the cases, but as these will be fully enumerated in the index and can easily be referred to, it will not I think be necessary for me to notice them further in this report.

In referring to the table relating to the steps taken for the abatement of the Smoke Nuisance, I should wish to state, that the Officer who has had to attend to this duty has invariably found that on the part of the Masters of Works great anxiety for the success of the measures adopted to suppress the nuisance, and had in all cases been assured of their willingness to meet the wishes of the Corporation. Many of such parties have gone to very considerable expense in making alterations and improvements in their fireplaces and chimneys &c, and it has been most gratifying to witness the desire exhibited to render the exertions of the Corporation to lessen the nuisance as far as possible successful. That such exertions have not been lost, and that the Town is much freer from smoke than formerly will be I think generally admitted.

The only remaining tables which it may be necessary to notice are those relating to the population increase of buildings, and the conduct of Constables. As regards to the first it will be seen that the population of the Municipal Borough of Manchester is computed to about 300,000persons. The number has been ascertained in the same manner as last year, viz, by taking the average number for each inhabited house or cellar according to the rate represented to exist in each Police Division which gives a general average for the whole Borough of about 5.9 persons to each inhabited house and 4.5 to each inhabited cellar The public institutions have been taken at the same number. The total number of dwelling houses within the Borough is 47,323, and of dwelling cellars 4,838; of the former 845 were uninhabited when taking the return and of the latter 295; many however of the uninhabited dwelling houses were new house which had never been tenanted. The number of new dwelling houses which have been erected during the the year is 1627 and there were also 408 more in the course of erection when the return was taken.

As respects the conduct of the Officers and Constables and the working of the Police Establishment it affords me great pleasure to have it in my power to state that the returns for the present year exhibit a very marked improvement in the general behaviour of the Force, and I feel assured that it will be satisfactory to the Committee to be informed that the beneficial measures which have been adopted to promote good order and to create a greater attachment to the service by the establishment of a class of merit at an increased rate of wages, and the foundation of a fund for the relief of those who might be injured or worn out in the service, have aided very materially in producing the good results now recorded.

The Committee will be glad to learn that from the Merit Class consisting of 123 Constables , there has not been one single dismissal and only five punishments by reduction in rank, that fourteen members of this body have promoted to the rank of sub Inspector, and three recommended for for other situations upon the application of parties requiring to be supplied with efficient men. Of the class of ordinary Constables consisting of 248 persons, 50 have been promoted to the Merit Class been placed on the Superannuated List , and 22 have been dismissed.

Of the Sub Inspector consisting of 45 persons, 5 have been promoted to the rank of Inspector, one has been recommended for situations and only one has been dismissed.

The total number of dismissals during the year from the regular Police Force consisting of 447 persons has been 24 whilst in the preceding year it amounted to 48, and in the year 1844, to 99, and in both instances with a Force of much smaller numbers.

It will be thus seen there has been a continual and progressive improvement taking place in the conduct of the Force, and although much may be ascribed to the system and good regulations which have been adopted, and to the great zeal and ability of the Superintendents, still there can be no doubt whatever that the measures which have been sanctioned by the Committee and the determination ever exhibited to allow no offence to pass unpunished have been largely instrumental in inducing good behaviour on part of the Force. I confidently expect that the establishment of a library and a reading room at each of the principal stations as contemplated will materially aid in increasing the good results which have already been obtained and will tend to improve the intellectual attainment of the men, and to make them better qualified for higher situations either in the Police Force or in private life.

In concluding this report it may perhaps be considered necessary that I should refer to the annual expenditure of the Force which I am happy to inform the Committee will be less by upwards of £200 than the sum name in the estimate as likely to be required. The actual expense that has been incurred from the first day of April last to the present time in pay, salaries and contingencies, including the purchase of the new capes, has amounted to £21,180 and the sum which be required to meet the pay, salaries, contingencies from the present up to the end of April including the cost of new clothing and hats, which is being contracted for, can be accurately calculated and will amount to £4,420 making the total expense for the Force for the year amount to £25,600 being rather more than £200 under estimate which was £25,821.

The Police Force including all ranks at present number 469 person, but when the estimate was prepared the number only amounted to 435 persons. Arrangements had however prior to the estimate being prepared to increase the number of the Force to 469 persons on the 1st October last and therefore provision was made 435 person for the first 5 months of the year, and for 469 persons for the next 7 months of the year.

The average number of persons who have continually employed throughout the year will amount to 455 persons, and the cost per head on expenditure of £25,000 to £56 5s 4d which is the lowest average cost per head in any year since the Force has been under the control of the Watch Committee, and less by upward of £15 15s 0d per head than was the average when the Force was under the charge of the Government Commissioner.

As a comparison between the two periods will more prominently show the economy which has been observed since the Police Force has been under the control of the Watch Committee I may mention that the annual cost of the Police Force when under the Commissioner amounted to £23,622, the average number employed to328 persons at a cost per head to £72 0s 5d whilst the expense of the Police Force under the Watch Committee during the present year will amount to £25,600 the average numbers employed to 455 person and the cost per head to £56 5s 4d. It thus appears that with an expenditure of only £1978 more than that of the Commissioner, 127 additional men have been employed by the committee, although the annual cost of 127 men calculated at the average expense of £56 5s 4d per head would amount to £7112, and if calculated at the rate of £72 0s 5d per head which was the average expense per head of the Police the under control of the Commissioner to the sum of £9146.

The above facts will I think satisfactorily prove that great care has been taken to economise so far as possible the expenditure of this Department.

I have only to add in conclusion that the Borough is in a peaceful and quiet state and although much distress prevails, and many persons are out of employ the offences and apprehensions are fewer than they were at the corresponding period last year. The Police are performing their duties in vigilant and efficient manner, and in a way that is not less creditable to themselves, than it is beneficial to the public.


Edward Willis

Chief Constable


Resolved

That 500 copies of the Report of the Chief Constable and of the statistical returns submitted therewith be printed under the directions of the Chairman and Deputy Chairman.


Meeting 25th March 1847

Resolved

That John Evans having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed a Police Constable.


Meeting 1st April 1847

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough.


Charles Jones

Solomon Needham

George Smith

Alfred Warburton

Ralph Harrison

Thomas Lowe

John Swan

Isaac Parker

John Lowe

George Cartwright

Resolved

That the following Sub Inspectors having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Inspectors at the wages of 30/- per week; Henry Keenan and John Beatty.


Resolved

That the following Police Constables having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Sub Inspectors at the wages of 25/- per week.


A13

Henry Lovatt

B21

John Gibson

A75

John Johnson

B22

John Fry

A41

John Dixon

C32

Frederick W Granham

A61

John Jones

D9

William Riley


Meeting 8th April 1847

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: William Burgess and William Broomhead.


Meeting 15th April 1847

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:


Robert Payne

John Higgins

Joseph Millinton

George Sheply

William Lockwood



Meeting 22nd April 1847

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

George Grundy Brien, Patrick McAdam and Alexander Finley.


Meeting 29th April 1847

Resolved

That the following allowances be made during the ensuing year to the parties employed in the E Detective Division of the Force in lieu of new uniforms which they will not require during that period, their present uniforms being in good condition from having generally to perform duty in private clothing:

Inspectors Mullins, Maybury, Buckley and Sub Inspector Moran @ 7/6 per month;

Constables Duckworth, Bowes and Lowcock @ 6/2 per month;

such allowances amounting together to the sum of £8 5s 3d the actual cost of uniforms.

Resolved

That the following Police Constables having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed sub Inspectors at the wages of 25/- per week:

B23 George Pearson and C39 William Hatton.

Resolved

That the Clerk of the Manchester District County Court be informed that the attendance of Police Constables of the Borough on Court Days cannot be allowed in future unless the payment hitherto made for such attendance at the Court of Request be continued.

Resolved

That as the business of the Nuisance Committee is now performed by Officers appointed and paid by that Committee with the exception of the duties connected with the prevention of smoke now performed by Inspector Fox, the Nuisance committee be requested to make arrangements for providing an Office for that Department, and to relieve the Watch Committee from the expense at present incurred by them in relation to such duties.


Meeting 6th May 1847

Lodging House Regulation and Cleansing of

Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the Council's proceedings on the 5th May inst was read out.

That the Watch Committee be and hereby empowered to execute and perform all or any of the matters or purposes in relation to the inspection , approval, regulations and cleaning of Lodging Houses, which the Council are in and by 79th and following Sections up to and including the 83rd Section or any of them of the 8th and 9th Victoria Cap 141 ( The Manchester Sanitary Improvement Act) authorised and empowered to do, execute and perform, and for the purposes aforesaid, such committee shall have all the powers, authorities and discretions which in by and by the said sections or any of them are given to and reposed in the Council.


Memorandum

The following extract from the Minutes of the proceedings of the Building and Sanitary Regulations Committee was read out.

That the report of the Medical Officers of the Hulme District to the Guardians of the Chorlton Union now read be transmitted to the Watch Committee.

That a copy of so much of the report presented by the Superintendent now read which relates to the Lodging Houses and houses sublet in apartments together with Tables 1 and 2 referred to therein be transmitted to the Watch Committee

Memorandum

The documents referred to in the preceding extract were submitted and handed to the Chief Constable with the report of the Medical Officer of the Chorlton Union.

Resolved

That the Chief Constable be and he is hereby appointed and authorised to fix and determine the numbers of lodgers to be accommodated in any Lodging House within the Borough and to make and issue such rules and regulations in relation to the health, cleanliness and ventilation of such Lodging Houses within the Borough, and to cause a Register to be kept of the number of lodgers authorised to be recited therein.

Resolved

That William Gifford having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Inspector at the wages of 30/- per week in place of Rowe resigned.


Meeting 13th May 1847

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

Phineas Hoyle

Christopher Preston

John Robinson

Charles Crofton

William Moran



Meeting 20th May 1847


Memorandum

The following report by the chief Constable was read out.

The Chief Constable begs to submit for the information of the Committee the undermentioned particulars of the duties which have been performed by the Police in carrying into effect the Sanitary measures directed by the Committee.

In the first instance the occupiers of all lodging Houses for the poorer classes were served with a printed notice detailing the powers which are granted to the Council by the Sanitary Regulation Act and the Police Act for the purposes of promoting cleanliness in Lodging Houses.

As the serving of these notices together with the duties which had to be performed by the Police in the examination of the apartments was considered to entails some risk to the Officers in consequence of the prevalence of Fever in many of these places, the Chief Constable thought it advisable to appoint no particular Officers to undertake the duty, but informed such as might be inclined to volunteer their services that he would recommend to the Committee that an allowance of five shillings per week should be granted to them in addition to their usual weekly wage. Two officers in each Division immediately volunteered to take the duty, and they have already visited a large portion of the Borough, and their reports confirm the account destitution and sickness prevail to a considerable extent.

An arrangement has been made with the Guardians of the Poor that all cases of Fever which may be reported by the Police shall be removed, and in many instances the Guardians have removed such case which have been reported by the Police, but in some instances they unfortunately have not been able to do so, owing to the fever being full, the Police however have taken prompt measures to disinfect and cleanse such places as were found in a dirty and unhealthy state, and for the more speedy performance of this duty the Chief Constable allowed the Superintendents in their several Divisions to engage three labourers to accompany the Sanitary Officers for the purposes of whitewashing and cleansing the houses.

In some instances the owners of the Lodgings on receiving the printed notices caused their Lodgings to be whitewashed and cleansed, but in many instances they omitted with the directions contained in the notice pleading their inability from poverty.

Should the committee not be able to recover the expense which may [be] incurred, the Chief Constable thinks the money will be well spent as the increase of Fever will most probably be prevented or very much checked, and the health of the inhabitants very materially promoted.

The Chief Constable cannot concluded this report without naming to the Committee that destitution misery and illness exists to a very great extent, but is happy at the same time to announce that the Guardians have come to the resolution to cause the houses in which either destitution or sickness are reported by the Police to exist, to be visited by their own Officers for the purpose of affording relief.

Annexed is a table containing in tabular form the duty which has been performed by the Police in carrying out sanitary measures, and with the weekly estimates of pay for the Police Constables is submitted an account of the expense which has been incurred during the last fortnight in wages to the Sanitary Officers and labourers employed in whitewashing &c, and for lime, buckets and brushes which amounts to £ 13 1s 1d


Returns showing what steps have been taken by the Police in regard to Solitary measures, and the the number of cases of illness and destitution since the 6th May instant.


 

Division

No of streets

No of lodging houses visited

No of houses found in a dirty state

No whitewashed by the occupying tenant after receiving notice

No whitewashed by the Police

No of cases of Fever reported

No of cases of smallpox reported

No of other cases of illness

Total No of Case reported to the Guardians

Total No of persons found in a state of want and destitution at the houses visited

Total No of persons found destitute in the streets since the sanitary measures have been in application

Total No of privies found in a filthy state and reported

A

62

156

95

68

21

23

2

20

-

57

-

21

B

46

235

117

50

30

59

5

20

59

175

14

436

C

18

21

33

16

11

20

3

6

19

28

-

54

D

8

54

52

4

26

19

14

13

46

33

9

20

Total

134

466

297

138

88

121

24

59

124

293

23

531


204 cases of illness.

May 19th 1847



Meeting 3rd June 1847

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:


Richard Fawcett

Thomas Callinan

Emanuel Simpson

William Wylde

Thomas Brocklehurst

William Marshall

Daniel Cornwell

Michael Daley

Joseph Boocock

Thomas Nevett

Edward Wall

James Duggan

Thomas Bolton

John Weston

David Dyson

John Wibberley

Peter Holme




Meeting 17th June 1847


Memorandum

The following extract was read from the minutes of the proceedings of the Nuisance Committee on the 16th June instant. “That the Watch Committee be respectfully requested to swear in the following Nuisance Inspectors as Constables of the Borough : Inspectors Ogden, Kay and Jenkins.”


Memorandum

The before mentioned Nuisance Inspectors attended and were sworn in as Constables of the Borough.


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:


Thomas Cooke

Joseph Gent

Samuel Walker

Joshua Wilson

Henry Whewell

Jeremiah Goodwin

Thomas Thompson

John Green


Memorandum

The following letter dated 9th June inst from Mr George Ferneley was read out complaining of the conduct of Mr Sawley in causing the removal of his tenant Mrs Chester from the house no 31 Bridgewater Street.


Resolved

That the house No 31 Bridgewater Street being kept by the tenant Mary Ann Chester as a common Brothel and complained of by the inhabitants as a nuisance to the neighbourhood, Mr Ferneley be informed that Mr Sawley did no more than his duty in abating the nuisance complained of.


Meeting 24th June 1847

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: John Flannagan, John Marsland and John Garvey.


Meeting July 1st 1847

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:


Joseph Rangdale

John Duffy

Richard Thompson

Patrick [Sharnley]



Meeting 8th July 1847

Resolved

That John Jones acting as a junior clerk be appointed senior clerk with the rank of Inspector, and be paid wages of 30/- per week with suitable clothing and allowances as an Inspector.

Resolved

That Police Constable Joseph Wood as acting as clerk to be appointed junior clerk with the rank of Sub Inspector , and be paid the wage of 25/- per week with clothing and boot money as allowed to Sub Inspectors.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: Joseph Dean, James Kennedy and Reuben Baxendale.


Town Hall Lockups and Stationary

The following report was read out:

The Chief Constable ventures again to remind the Watch Committee of the unhealthy and ill ventilated state of the Lockups and Police Offices under the Town Hall and would earnestly suggest that some alterations should be speedily made , as several of the Officers of the Police Force have been obliged to give up their situations in consequence of their health failing from the effects of these ill ventilated places, and others are complaining of their health suffering from the same cause.

Resolved

That a copy of the report of the Chief Constable now read be transmitted to the General Purposes Committee, with a request that they will as early as possible take steps for making the requisite alterations in the Town Hall to remedy the serious evils complained of in the above report and that the General Purposes Committee be requested to appoint a deputation to meet a deputation of this Committee for the purposes of conferring as to the best means of providing the required accommodation.


Meeting 15th July 1847

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:


John Connelly

John Long

George Dalgleish

Isaiah Shaw

Robert Hargreaves

Thomas Waldron

James Moffatt

William Smith

John Sutcliffe



Resolved

That the wages of James Shaw, clerk in the Detective Department be increased from 20/- per week to 25/- per week.


Meeting 29th July 1847

Memorandum

The following communication from Mr A B Rowley, the Clerk to the Guardians of the Chorlton Union, was read out including the report of the Medical Officers for Chorlton upon Medlock in relation to the overcrowding of lodging houses in that locality.

Resolved

That the same be referred to the Chief Constable with instruction to take such proceedings in the cases referred to as are authorised by the Police Act; and that the Town Clerk informs Mr Rowley of the steps taken in reference to his communication.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: John Allen and John Shackleton.


Meeting 5th August 1847

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:


Thomas Day

Edward Owen

John Pedley

James Kennedy


Meeting 12th August 1847


Salaries

Resolved

That the salaries of Superintendents Taylor and Leary be and are hereby advanced from £150 to £180 a year – such increase to commence on 1st September next.


Merit Class

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby promoted to the Merit Class:


A33

James Lumb

A3

Samuel Freeman

C2

Joseph Platt

C19

Henry Butler


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:


Henry Lightfoot

James McGrath

Isaac Grundy

Patrick Kelly

John Smith



Police Relief Fund – PC A Lee

Resolved

That upon consideration of the report this day made by the Chief Constable of the past services and present state of health and position of Police Constable B77 Abraham Lee the sum of 9/- per week (being half of his weekly pay) be paid to him on his retirement from the Force out of the Police Relief Fund, as a superannuation allowance.


Meeting 19th August 1847

Lamp Breakages

Memorandum

The following extract from the minute of the proceedings of the Lamp &c Committee on the 17th August inst was read out:

That for the purposes of lessening as much as possible the breakages and damages to street lamps, the Watch Committee

be requested to give directions to the Police when on duty in the streets, to prevent stone throwing, ball or cricket playing or any other game calculated to cause injury to the street lamps and also to make inquiries with the view of discovering the cause of any breakage and the names and addresses of the parties damaging the lamps.

That as an inducement to the Police Lamplighters or other parties to make enquiries and give information relative to breakages of lamps, the following scale of gratuities to be adopted, and be allowed in all cases where the damage to the lamp is paid for:


Damage of 5/- or upwards

1/- gratuity

Damage between 2/6 and 5/-

6d gratuity

Damage of less than 2/6

3d gratuity



Resolved

That the extract be referred to the Chief Constable.

Resolved

That the Lamp &c Committee be informed that instruction in accordance with their resolution has been given to the Police, but that it is contrary to the rules of the Force, to allow Police Constables gratuities.


Meeting 26th August 1847

Resolved

That John Marsden having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed a Constable of the Borough.


Meeting 2nd September 1847

Merit Class

Resolved

That the following Constables having appeared before the Committee and there are hereby in accordance with the recommendation of the Chief Constable promoted to the Merit Class: D24 Thomas Riley and D68 Samuel Gratrix.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: Joseph Thacker, Frederick Pendleton and Joseph Henton.


Meeting 7th September 1847

Resolved

That James Thompson having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed a Constables of the Borough.

Memorandum

A letter dated September 9th inst from Mr A Spier requesting the Committee to swear in as a Constable, the Apparitor of the Hebrew Synagogue Halliwell Street.

Resolved

That Mr A Spier be informed that his application cannot be complied with with as the Committee invariably decline to swear in any parties as Constable who are not immediately under their direction and control.


Meeting 16th September 1847

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: Samuel Gough, William Barker Casson and Arthur Parker.


Meeting 23rd September1847

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: Royal Thomas, Thomas Bramhall and William Hilton


Meeting 30th September 1847

Resolved

That this Committee having accepted with regret the resignation tendered by Mr Cochrane of the Office of Superintendent of the Borough Police, feel bound on his retirement to record their sense of the honourable, faithful and satisfactory manner in which for a period upwards of eight years, and since the establishment of the Police under the Corporation, he has discharged his duties of his Office so as to reflect great credit upon himself, and to be of advantage to not only to the Division under his immediate control, but to the whole of the Force, with which he has been so long associated.

That this Committee tender to Mr Cochrane their best wishes for his future prosperity. That a copy of this resolution be furnished to Mr Cochrane by the Town Council.


Meeting 14th October 1847

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: John Williamson, James Wood and Sampson Illingworth.


Meeting 21st October 1847

Resolved

That John Richardson having appeared before the Committee is herby appointed a Police Constable.

Resolved

That Inspector William Saynor be and he is hereby appointed Superintendent of the C Division of the Police Force at the salary of £150 per annum.


Meeting 28th October 1847

Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the Lamp &c Committee's proceedings on the 26th instant:

That the Watch Committee be informed that a considerable increase has lately taken place in the breakage of street lamps; and that they be respectfully requested to give such instructions to the Police Officers as may tend to remedy or lessen the evil.


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be directed to call the attention of the Superintendents to the resolution of the Lamp &c Committee now read, and that that Committee be informed that attention will be given to their communication.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: Samuel Peers and Charles Brown.


Meeting 4th November 1847

Memorandum

Read application from Mr Isaac Gault for a payment of £500 on account of clothing supplied to the Police Force.

Resolved

That the account included in the following statement, having been examined and certified as correct on behalf of this Committee, and amounting to the sum of £500 be and is hereby approved of; and that a copy of this resolution and statement signed by the Chairman and two members of this Committee be transmitted to the Treasurer of the Borough, who is hereby instructed to lay the same, together with the account included therein, before the Financial Committee for payment.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:


George Hirst

Robert Wilson

Charles H Harris

Richard Hennessey

Joseph Bettison

John Marsland

Francis Ogden



Meeting 18th November 1847

Resolved

That the Chairman plus three members be requested to consider and report as to the best mode of carrying into effect the resolution of the Watch Committee on 9th January last relative to the establishment of a library and reading rooms for the benefit of the Police Officers and Constables.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:


Adam Pidcock

James Connell

Thomas Brackshaw

Alfred Whittaker


Resolved

That in accordance with the recommendation of the Chief Constable, Police Constable B74 William Ferguson be promoted to the Merit Class.


Meeting 25th November 1847

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: Henry Wallace and Adam Percival

 

POLICE REFLIEF FUND

Resolved

That upon consideration of the report this day made by the Chief Constable of the past services and present state of health of Sub Inspector Darby Moran, E Division the sum of twenty five pounds be allowed and paid to him as a gratuity on his retirement from the Force, out of the Police Relief Fund.


Meeting 2nd December 1847


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: Robert Dunn, Thomas Hudson and James Drew.


Meeting 9th December 1847

Memorandum

The following letter was read out:

Manchester, December 8th 1847

To the Watch Committee of the Town Council of the Borough of Manchester


Gentlemen,

I an directed by the Guardians of the Manchester Union to request that you will be pleased to allow Christopher Steele, Assistant Vagrant Officer of the Union to be sworn in as a Constable of the Borough of Manchester.

Jno Harrop

Clerk to the Guardians


Resolved

That the application of Mr Harrop be considered at the next meeting.


Meeting 16th December 1847


Resolved

That again, the application of Mr Harrop be considered at the next meeting.


Meeting 23rd December 1847


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: Peter McMillan, Henry Berry and Jonathan Howarth.


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be authorised to to dispose of the old worn out Police Clothing, and that the proceeds be paid into the Police Relief Fund.


Memorandum

The Chief Constable reported in reference to the letter of Mr John Mills referred to him, for enquiry at the last meeting, that Buckley Street, which Mr Mills stated was not properly watched, was visited once every forty five minutes by night, and once every half hour by day.


Resolved,

That a copy of he preceding report be transmitted to Mr John Mills, and also to the Lamp &c Committee.


Meeting 30th December 1847

Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the Lamp &c Committee's proceeding of 28th December instant, were read out:

That the report now read from Inspector Fieldhouse relative to the conduct of Police Constable 91 C Division in the case of assault on himself on the 15th December instant, be transmitted to the Watch Committee.

Resolved

That the report now read be referred to the Chief Constable, to enquire and report thereon.

Resolved

That Thomas Ancell having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed a Police Constable.

 

Meeting 6th January 1848

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: Patrick Goss, Robert Spaven and John Bostock.

Memorandum

The Town Clerk reported that it is on public grounds desirable that the Assistant Vagrant Officer should be as requested by the Guardians of the Manchester Union duly sworn in to act as a Constable, as he is frequently required to seek out in different districts, and to apprehend when found, runaway husbands for neglecting to support their families; and in case the Vagrant Officer, who is generally personally acquainted with the individuals to be apprehended, was not authorised to act, it would be necessary to employ one of the Police Officers.

The Town Clerk recommended that the Vagrant Officer should be appointed and sworn in as a Constable, - and explained that the Watch Committee would by dismissal or striking the name of such party out of the list of Constables, in case of improper conduct being proved, deprive him of all power thereafter to act as a Constable.

Resolved

That the Town Clerk be authorised to state in reply to Mr Harrop's application on behalf of the Board of Guardians that if the Assistant Vagrant Officer be directed to attend at the next meeting of this Committee, he will be appointed and sworn in as a Constable.


Meeting 13th January 1848

Memorandum

Christopher Steele Assistant Vagrant Officer for the Manchester Union appeared before the Committee, and was duly appointed and sworn to act as a Constable.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables: David Gill and Denis Murray.

Resolved

That Sub Inspector Thomas Dodson, D Division, having appeared before the Committee, be and is hereby appointed Inspector at the wages 30/- per week.


Meeting 20th January 1848

Resolved

That in accordance with the recommendation of the Chief Constable the following Police Constables be promoted to the Merit Class: A15 Charles Harrison, 51 Francis Ogden and 72 John Marsland.


Meeting 27th January 1849

Police Library

The following report was read out.

The Library sub Committee propose that the Library so far as regards the supply of books, periodicals, newspapers, pamphlets &c &c be established and maintained out of the proceeds of the Fine Fund and from other private sources without calling upon the Police to contribute any money towards its formation or support from their private funds.

That a general central depot be established at the Town Hall for the deposit of the books and that a room be granted and suitably fitted up for such purpose.

That a room be provided also at each of the principal Police Stations furnished with a table, forms, gaslight and fires as a reading room for the Constables.

That the expense of fitting up the room at the Town Hall as the depot for books as also the furnishing orf the rooms at the principal Police Stations for reading rooms executed at the public expense under the direction of the Watch Committee.

That a sub committee of the Watch Committee be denominated the “Library Committee” and consisting of the Chairman, deputy Chairman and three other members of the Committee be appointed annually for the purpose of approving and purchasing the books, periodicals, newspapers &c, and regulating such other matters connected with the Library as may be necessary.

That a fund be formed to be called The Police Library Fund into which such sums shall be paid as may be granted by the Watch Committee from time to time out of [the] Fine Fund for use of the Library as well as other monies which may be received from other sources for the same object.

That the Chief Constable be appointed Treasurer for the Library Fund to whom shall be entrusted the general management of the Library under the direction of the Library Committee.

That one of the clerks at the Town hall be appointed Librarian and that he be allowed such annual remuneration out of the Library Fund for the trouble which may be entailed on having the charge of the Library and the distribution and receiving back the books &c as the Committee may determine.

That a general register of all books, periodical, pamphlets &c kept by the Librarian as also all such other forms as may be necessary in working detail + as may be deemed expedient.

That catalogues of the books and different works belonging to the Library be furnished to each of the Divisions.

That members of the Force who may wish to have books to read be required to make their applications through their own Superintendent who will send a requisition for the books which may be wanted by the Division to the Librarian.

That register books of an approved form for the purpose of entering the names of the parties to whom books be issued as also for recording the state of repair in which the book was delivered out and received back from the reader be kept at each of the Divisions.

That members of the Force who may wish to have books to read be required to make their application through their own Superintendent, who will send a requisition for the books which may ne wanted by the Division to the Librarians.

That register books of an approved form for the purpose of entering the names of the parties to whom books be issued for recording the state of repair in which the book was delivered out and received back from the reader be kept at each of the Divisions.

That the time allowed for the possession of any work in each Division be limited to 14 days except in case where no other application from another Division for the same work has been made to the Librarian when the time may be extended, in all such cases a fresh application to be made to the Librarian for a renewal of time in order that regularity may be observed in in keeping the entries and in affording to each Division the opportunity of obtaining the work in regular rotation.

That the time allowed to each member of the Force for reading any book which he may either keep at the Station or take to his lodgings as he prefers be limited to 6 days.

That no member of the Force be allowed to lend any book to persons not belonging to the Police Force nor to ask for any book except for his own reading or that of his comrades conjointly, and that he return the same to his Superintendent to be delivered into the hands of the Librarian so soon as he has read the same even if it be before the expiration of the usual time allowed for reading the book.

That any member of the Force who may detain a book beyond the time allowed for reading the same be subject to ato the penalty of one penny per day for every day that he may keep the book beyond the regulated time, and that he be required in the event of wishing to have the book for a renewed period to render his name for the same in the usual manner and take his turn after the other applicants who may be on the list before him.

That no remarks be written in any of the books or publications , nor the corners of the leaves turned down, and that in the event of any damage being done to a book whilst in the charge of any member of the Force beyond what may be termed fair wear, he be required to pay the damage or renew the work.

That in the event of any book or other work being found damaged when returned to the Superintendent or Officer of the Division employed to receive and examine the same the person who has had the book or work be informed of the nature of the damage and of his liability to a charge for repair.

That a report of the damage with the name of the person in whose charge the book was placed when the damage took place be reported from the Division to the Librarian when delivering the book into the Library.

That one specified hour be appointed to suit the convenience of the Librarian in each day of the week for the purpose of transacting the business relating to the giving out and receiving books.

That the Superintendents of the several Divisions be required to see that the regulations for forwarding the periodicals and newspapers in the order which may be determined upon be properly carried into effect.

The sum at present on hand belonging to the Police Fine Fund amounts to upwards of £200 and the Sub Committee recommend that an amount of £100 be appropriated out of the Fine Fund for the purpose of forming a Library Fund and commencing the establishment of a Library.

The Sub Committee in conclusion is happy to inform the Watch Committee that the Editors of the different Manchester newspapers have most liberally offered to supply a copy of each publication of their respective papers gratis to the Police Force

Resolved

That the recommendations contained in the report now read be and are hereby adopted.

Resolved

That the Sub Committee now reporting be requested to further consider and report as to the number and description of newspapers and periodicals which it is desirable to provide for the Library, and generally upon the various details and arrangements required for carrying out their recommendations.


Meeting 10th February 1848

Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the proceedings of the Nuisance Committee on 9th instant was read out:

That the attention of the Watch Committee be called to the great increase in the nuisances created in the streets and places enumerated in the list submitted by the Superintendent by the throwing of filth into the streets during the night time, and that the said Committee be respectfully be requested to instruct the Constables to notice and report to this Committee such cases of nuisances.

Resolved

That the extract and list now read be referred to the Chief Constable with instructions to direct the Constables on the beats in the localities stated to use vigilance in detecting and reporting all nuisances of the description referred to.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:


William Broadbent

Thomas Cottrill

William Whittaker

James Walter

Charles Wood

Edward Wheeler*


 Meeting 24th February 1848

Lockup Accommodation

Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the General Purposes Committee on 4th February:


That Mr Frederic Hill's letter to the Mayor relative to the Lockup Housed within the Borough of Manchester be transmitted to the Watch Committee.

Manchester, January 27th 1849

Sir,

I beg to make the following recommendations arising from an inspection of the Lockup Houses and Police Cells in Manchester.

1 Instead of the allowance of food being indefinite as at present and depending in part on the varying cost of provisions and the liberality of the particular keeper, the quantity to be fixed at one pound and a half of bread daily and a pint and a half or milk or coffee , to be given in three separate meals of half a pound of bread and half a pint of coffee or milk each.

2 The means of washing to be provided at each Lockup House, and no prisoner be allowed to have any food, whether from the prison or his friends, until he has washed himself thoroughly.

3 A supply of rugs or blankets to be supplied at each Lockup House for such prisoners who remain through the night.

4 To prevent unnecessary mixture and contamination of prisoners, a van to be built, such as those in use in London and elsewhere, divided into smaller compartments, so that the prisoners may be kept individually separate.

5 The Chief Constable to be requested to present to the whole Watch Committee a quarterly report on the state of the lock-up houses with any suggestions which may occur to him for their improvement.

The foregoing recommendations are general. The following relate to particular lock-houses.


I - Police Cells under the Town Hall:

1 Gas to be introduced into cells, as already recommended by my predecessor, Captain Williams and to be so protected by a small iron frame that the prisoners cannot injure the jets.

2 The ventilation of two of the cells to be improved as explained on the spot to Mr Shorland, and in part suggested by him.

3 Some of the seats to be widened.


II- Police Cells under the Borough Court:

Gaslight to be so placed as to throw light into the cells.


III- Police Station in Oldham Road :

The light and ventilation of the cells to be improved in the way suggested by Captain Willis.


IV- Police Station in Cavendish Street :

The lighting to be improved as explained on the spot to Captain Willis.


V- Police Station in Gt Jackson Street:

These cells which are neither warmed or ventilated, to wholly discontinued; and until a new and better police station is provided, any person who is brought to this Station and who cannot be immediately conveyed to the Station in Cavendish St to be detained in the office,


VI- Police Station in Deansgate:

A strong pane of glass to be put into each of the shutters so as to allow of the shutters being closed in cold weather without the cells being made dark.


In the foregoing recommendations I have confined myself to such improvements as will be attended with small expense and will be productive, I hope, of immediate benefit – If they should be adopted, some of the lock-up houses would, I think, require but little farther change, especially considering the small number of prisoners committed to them, but in other cases, particularly those of the lock-up houses under the Town Hall and Borough Court, the cells even with the improvements suggested, will continue to be very unsuitable for their purposes.

The only effectual remedy in these latter cases, in my opinion, would be the erection of a new set of Police Cells on the land adjoining the Police Office at the Town Hall; and in order to avoid the necessity of having another range of Police Cells elsewhere and of removing prisoners from place to place, and with a view also to provide a more convenient and commodious Court for trial than the present Borough Court, I would strongly recommend that at the first suitable opportunity a new Borough Court be erected on the land adjoining the Town Hall, so the the Chief Police Officer, the chief place for the temporary detention of offenders and the Court in which most of the offenders are tried may all be together.

The plan which I would suggest in the construction of a new police prison would be to have a sufficient number of cells (very small ones would suffice) to allow of all the prisoners, under ordinary circumstances, being separate, with two or three large rooms for use when from any peculiar cause there was an unusual influx of prisoners.

When the foregoing recommendations have been considered I shall be obliged by your informing me in a letter addressed to me under cover to me the Secretary of State, what what resolutions are adopted respecting them.

Signed

Frederic Hill

[Prison Inspector]


Resolved

That Mr Hill's letter be referred to the Chief Constable with instructions to consider the suggestions contained therein, and report as to the propriety as well as practicability of carrying the same into effect.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: Richard Larker and Abraham Dobson.


Meeting 9th March 1848

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: George Fox, John Driver and John Gee.

Memorandum

The following letter from Mr John Mills was read, complaining that Buckley St, Collyhurst and the immediate neighbourhood are not properly watched and that gambling is extensively practised in the locality on the Sundays.

Resolved

That the letter be referred to the Chief Constable with instruction to enquire and report thereon at the next meeting.


POLICE LIBRARY

Memorandum

The Library Sub-Committee having taken into consideration the subject of furnishing the Police Reading Rooms with newspapers and periodicals propose as follows:

That five copies of the London “Daily News”, which can be obtained on the afternoon of the day of publication at the reduced price of [ ??] per paper or at the rate of £4 per quarter for five papers, be taken in and that one paper be assigned to each Division of Police.

That the offers made by the proprietors of the different Manchester Newspapers to furnish one paper of each publication gratis for the benefit of the Police be accepted and that the said newspapers be distributed to the several Police Divisions changing every week the order of rotation so that each Division may have in success the different publications.

That no person be allowed to cut out any advertisement or others wise mutilate or damage any of the newspapers.

That no person be allowed to take any of the newspapers out of the Reading Room except under the authority of the Superintendent, or to remove the paper after it has been in the room the appropriate time.

That the time for keeping each London “Daily News” in the reading rooms be extended to three days, and that they be filed at the Division to which they belong, and in the event of any member of the Division wishing again to look at a paper the application for permission to do so to be made to the Superintendent.

That the several Manchester Newspapers after being retained at the Divisions for three days be transmitted to the Librarian at the Town Hall, as also the London “Daily News” belonging to the E Detective Division and that they be filed under his charge.

As respect periodical works the Sub-Committee are of the opinion that as the E Detective Division consists of only a small number of persons who can always have the advantage of reading such works when off duty in the reading room which is to be attached to the A Division at the Town Hall, and as it would be also unadvisable to allow books to be occupying the time of the Officers in the general Detective Office where much business is doing, it will not necessary to supply works of that kind specially for that Division.

The Sub-Committee therefore propose only to furnish periodicals to the stations that which have reading rooms and they recommend that four copies of each of the undermentioned monthly periodical works be taken in, and that one copy of each work be granted to each of the four Police Divisions: one Chamber's Monthly Journal; one Tait's Magazine and one Jerrold's Magazine.

That the regulations for preserving the periodicals in good order and free from damage as is established in regard to the books be enforced in regards to periodicals.

That no person be allowed to take any of the periodicals out of the reading room.

That the time fixed for retaining the periodicals in the reading room to one month until the receipt of the next month's ensuing publication.

That the periodicals after being being withdrawn from the reading rooms be filed at the Divisions to which they belong under the direction of the Superintendent who may lend out all such to be read under the same regulations as books.

The total annual cost of the periodicals will amount to £6 4s 0d and that of the newspapers to £16 which sum the Committee propose expending in the manner above recommended.


Resolved

That the report be adopted by this Committee.


Resolved

That the Town Clerk communicate to the proprietors of the several newspapers the thanks of this Committee for their offer to supply gratuitously a copy of their paper for the use of the Police Library.


Resolved

That it is desirable to appoint temporally and with as little delay as possible one hundred supernumerary Constables to act with the regular Police in case of need. [These men were used in the Chartist Riots]


Meeting 23rd March 1848

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

John Sumner, Thomas Smith, Thomas Ross and William Braddock.


Meeting 30th March 1848

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: James Harriman, John Williamson, William Dean and George Moncrief.


Return showing the numbers of each rank and the pay and salaries of the Manchester Police Constabulary.


Total Number of Each Rank

Rank

Salary Per Annum

1

Chief Constable at

£500.00

1

Chief Superintendent at

£350.00

1

Superintendent at

£200.00

3

Superintendents at

£150.00

2

Inspectors at 38s 6d per week

£100.00

18

Inspectors at 30s per week

£78.00

45

Sub Inspectors at 25s per week

£65.00

88

Merit Class Constables at 18s per week

£46 16s

281

Ordinary Constables at 17s per week

£44 4s

1

Coroner's Officer at 25s per week

£65.00

1

Messenger at 21s per week

£52.00

1

Clerk (storekeeper)

£100.00

1

Clerk

£78.00

2

Clerks

£65.00

1

Clerk

£46 16s

447

Total Established Strength



22 supernumeraries allowed to fill up vacancies occasioned through sickness absence and when employed are engaged at the salary of 17/- per week.

Contingent expenses allowed to the Chief Constable for house and cab hire &c £50.

Clothing allowed to the Superintendents .

Boot money at the rate of 2/- per month and clothing allowed to the other Officers and Constables of the Force.

Extra Supernumeraries

Memorandum

It was agreed that the Chief Constable might inform the extra Supernumeraries employed in consequence of the late disturbances that they would not be discharged from the services of the Committee without four weeks notice.


Meeting 6th April 1848


Resolved

That the following Sub-Inspectors having appeared before this Committee are hereby appointed Inspectors at the wages of 30/- per week: William Chawkley + Thomas Whitney (A Division) and John Callender (B Division)


Resolved

That Police Constable 23 James Stewart of the C Division having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Sub-Inspector at the wages of 25/- per week.


Resolved

That in accordance with the recommendation of the Chief Constable, Police Constable B52 William B Casson is hereby appointed to the Merit Class.


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: Leonard Allen, John Read, John Cookson and Samuel Stancliffe.


Police Relief Fund

The following letter to the Chief Constable was read out:

April 6th 1848

Sir,

We the undersigned late Inspectors of the Manchester Police Force having been appointed Inspectors of Weights and Measures by the Mayor and Magistrates of this Borough, and having contributed a considerable length of time to the Police Relief Fund, most respectfully request that we may still retain our membership.

W H Rook

Joseph Sutton


Resolved

That in reply to the application now made, the Chief Constable be directed to inform Mr Rook and Mr Sutton that the Committee could not under the rules laid down with respect to the distribution of the Police Relief Fund sanction their continuance as participants in it after having left the Force.


Meeting 27th April 1848

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: William Cliff, Joseph Horsfield, Joseph Simpson and James Shaw.


Criminal Statistical Returns – Report by Chief Constable


It affords me much satisfaction to be enabled upon the expiration of a year marked by almost unexampled prostrations of the trade and commerce of the Country and consequent distress and privation amongst the working classes of this District to lay before the Watch Committee, returns which will bear a very advantageous comparison with those of previous years and which afford conclusive evidence not only that the Police have efficiently and creditably performed their duties but that the effect of better education and increased intelligence amongst the people has been to promote good order and to restrain person notwithstanding the severe suffering which they have endured, from the commission of crime. It is satisfactory to observe that, notwithstanding the temptation to disorder or crime which it may be supposed distress and privation would have afforded., the peace of this City has been in no year more eminently maintained than during the year 1847 and that whilst quietness and good order have been promoted and increased, the apprehensions on the part of the Police have in a corresponding manner decreased.

It will be seen on examination of the first criminal table that the number of apprehensions has been smaller in the past year by 1042 persons than in the previous year of 1846, and less by upward of 7200 persons than in the year 1842. I am aware that it may be suggested that the diminution in the number of apprehensions may have arisen from inefficiency or want of energy on the part of the Police, and from their having neglected to perform their duty for the purpose of improperly screening offenders, but when it is considered that the City has been maintained in a much more peaceable and orderly state than is known to have been the casein previous years and especially during the years 1840, 1841 and 1842 when the number of apprehensions was greatest,- and that the Police have received the approbation not only of the Justices, but frequently also of the inhabitants themselves for the firm and effective, but at the same time, kind and conciliatory manner in which they have discharged their duties and exercised their powers, I feel assured that it will be readily admitted that the decrease in the number of apprehensions is not in any degree attributable to remissness of want of energy on the part of the Police, but on the contrary, that it is entirely owing to the general improvement before referred to in the conduct of the Officers, and to the efficiency displaced by the Police in repressing disorder, and the intelligence, discrimination and discretion which they have exhibited in the exercise of the large powers vested in them to take into custody person who are supposed to have committed offences against the Law. As I have been informed that both prior to and during the years 1840, 1841 and 1842 , it has on occasions been considered necessary to arm the Police, and as the Returns also show that in the years referred to the assaults upon the Police were so numerous as necessarily to induce the impression that for reasons which cannot now be explained the best feeling of the part of the inhabitants towards the Police did not exist, it may be well to remark that since the close of the year 1842, such has been the peaceable state of the Borough , and so little serious has been the character of any disturbances which have arisen, that in no instance has it been deemed necessary that the Police should make use of any other weapon than the ordinary baton: and such has been the improved feeling manifested of the part of the inhabitants that the charges of assault during each successive year , have been of a much less aggravated and serious character, and have also very considerably reduced in number, and I am happy to state that it now seldom occurs that any assault is committed on a Constable except, and that very rarely by persons under influence of liquor.

From such facts it may be reasonably assumed that the improved character of the Police , and the increased education and intelligence amongst the people, which diminished the necessity of interference on their part in connection with the effective and judicious manner in which the Law has been administered have together contributed to provide the most gratifying results, and to which I have now the satisfaction of directing the Committee. Although it can hardly be expected that in a community so rapidly increasing, the number of apprehensions will in future years be much further, if at all, reduced, I still have every reason to hope that it will not be much increased; as the efforts which are now being made both to educate and ameliorate the condition of the poorer classes of the community cannot fail to operate beneficially in promoting good good order and morality , and in increasing the kindly feeling which should exist between the wealthy and the poorer classes of the inhabitants, and which is in my opinion so likely to result in the lessening and diminution of crime. In support of the opinion which I have stated that the discretion which has been exercised by the Police on the one hand and the increased education and intelligence of the people on the other, have been instrumental in producing a decrease of prisoners , I may with satisfaction refer you to tables 20 and 21.

The first of these tables will show that whilst the number of prisoners discharged in the years 1840, 1841 and 1842 amounted to nearly three fourths of the gross number apprehended, the number of prisoners discharged during the past year amounted only to about one third of the number apprehended; and that whilst in the same years the proportion of persons summarily punished by the Justices only amounted to about one sixth of the number apprehended, the number of person summarily punished in the past year amounted to nearly one half of those apprehended; also that whilst the proportion of persons who were committed for trial during the same periods only amounted to about one fourteenth of the number apprehended, the number of persons committed for trial during the past year amounted to nearly one eighth of the number apprehended: or if stated in figures that whilst in the years 1840, 1841 and 1842, the annual apprehensions averaged 13,188, - the discharges 9,692, - the summary convictions 2,546, and the committals for trial 950, - the apprehensions for the past year have only amounted to 6,587, the discharges to 2,663, - the summary convictions to 3,091, - and the committals for trial to 833. Thus it will be seen that although the total number of persons who were apprehended during the past year has not amounted to nearly one half of the average number of persons annually taken into custody during the years 1840, 1841 and 1842, the number of persons who have been summarily punished by the Justices has actually, considerably exceeded the number summarily punished during in each of those years. These facts will I think satisfactorily demonstrate that discretion has been exercised by the Police in the exercise of their powers, and that efficiency does not depend on the numbers taken into custody, but rather on the discrimination which the Officers may exhibit in the discharge of their duties by apprehending only persons against whom some definite charge or complaint can be satisfactorily proved.

The second table refers to the state of education of the persons apprehended and committed for trial, and as it appears to me, the information given in the table affords satisfactory evidence that education has become more extended and that its influence has been to lessen crime and to repress disorder. It will be observed on examination of that portion of the table which refers to the education of the persons who have been annually taken into custody that there has been a very considerable annual reduction in the number of prisoners found unable to read or write, and that the percentage or proportion of such persons has decreased from an annual average during the years 1840, 1841 and 1842 of about 53 percent on the average numbers apprehended to rather less than 39 percent on the number apprehended during the year 1847; and that as regards the persons who were found during the same years to be able to read and write well and to have a superior education the percentage or proportion on the numbers annually taken into custody has decreased from an average of about 8.80 percent to 5.4 percent in 1847, thus proving that education has been considerably on the increase , and has been more generally extended amongst all classes but also that a better state of education and superior instruction have acted beneficially in diminishing crime. On the other hand it will be observed that although there has (as in the previous cases) been a gradual annual decrease in the class of prisoners reported to have been able to read and write only very imperfectly, the percentage or proportion of such class or persons has increased in consequence of the decrease of the persons so circumstanced not having been proportionate with the general annual decrease in the number of prisoners. The returns for instance shows that whilst the number of persons apprehended in the years 1840, 1841 and 1842 who were reported to be able to read and write only very imperfectly amounted to an annual average of 38.9 percent, the number of persons belonging to the same class in 1847 amounted to 56.3 percent. Such results might reasonably be anticipated, for as education extends, the number of prisoners possessing some degree of education will naturally increase and offenders are most likely to be found to be the most numerous amongst that class which enjoys the lowest degree of education.

The second portion of the table refers to the degree of education of the prisoners tried and convicted in each year since the year 1840: and as to the information which the table contains has been procured from the prison calendars (in which it may be presumed the state of education is correctly given) it is satisfactory to find that that the results correspond with those obtained from the information which has been procured from the Police Books, and stated in the preceding portion of the table in regard to the state of education of the persons taken into custody.

The portion of the returns referred to for instance shows that the average proportion of the prisoners annually tried and convicted in the years 1840, 1841 and 1842 who could neither read nor write has decreased from an annual average of 48.33 percent to that of 35.3 percent during the year 1847, and that the proportion of those who during the same years were reported to be able to read and write well, and to have a superior education has decreased from an average 12.3 percent on the average numbers annually tried and convicted to that of 5.88 percent in the year 1847:- whilst on the other hand the proportion of those who are stated to have had only imperfect instruction or to be able to read or write only very imperfectly has increased in the percentage from the average of about 38.93 percent, which existed in the years 1840, 1841 and 1842, to that of 58.8 percent during the past year: giving as nearly as possible in respect of the prisoners who have been tried and convicted from the information contained in the Prison calendars, the same results were obtained from the Police Books in regards to persons taken into custody.

In regard to the committals for trial it is doubtless matter for regret that there should have been any increase in the numbers of persons so circumstanced as compared with previous years and more especially as such increases of committals may be considered as indicating an increase of crime. The offence however which have been committed have not been of a serious or aggravated character, and considering the great distress which has existed during the past year and the great number of people who have been continually out of employment (as evidenced by the weekly returns which have been published by the press and as shown in the Tables of the present returns, relating to the state of employment of the operative classes who were engaged in mills and other large works during each month in the year and in the returns of prisoners who were found to be out of employment at the time of apprehension) it can hardly be a matter of surprise that there should have been an increase in the number of felonies or in that class of offence for which persons are usually committed for trials. It is only justice however to state that in the great majority of cases the offences against property above referred to have been of such a character as to render it almost impossible for the Police by any vigilance or care to prevent.

The entrances into buildings have been generally effected through back of premises enclosed by yards or through the roofs of buildings to which the Police have had no access many through coal grids which have been left insecure; some by means of false keys, and few comparatively and by far the smallest number by forcible entry, including those felonies which have been effected by cutting or breaking glass and lifting windows.

In more than half of the number of robberies from the person reported to have been committed with violence, the complainants were intoxicated when the robberies were stated to have taken place, and women were generally found to be the principal agents. Indeed in all descriptions of larcenies or robberies from the person, women appear to have been the parties who have committed or been the principals in committing those offences where the largest sums of money was reported to have been stolen.

The correctness of these statements will be fully shown by an examination of tables nos 32 and 33 which give a detailed account of the robberies from the person, committed by prostitutes and by men, also of the places where the robberies were committed; the mode in which effected; the amount of money &c stolen; the sum recovered by the Police; the number of prisoners apprehended and how they have been dealt with and finally disposed of. As the women engaged in committing such robberies usually belong to the lowest class of street walker who effect their depredations after dark when they have generally male associates within call to aid them in cases where they meet with parties intoxicated it may be worthy of consideration whether more stringent measures ought to be adopted for removing and deterring such persons from infesting the street.

The following table gives a return of the numbers of robberies from the person which have respectively been committed in Spirit Vaults and in public houses during the past year; and the information therein contained further shows that fewer fewer robberies have taken place in public house than in spirit vaults. The number of robberies from the person which have been committed in spirit vaults bears the proportion of 38 per cent to the number of vaults , whilst the proportion of of the same class committed in public houses which have no vaults attached to them does not amount to more than eight and a half per cent on the number of public houses. Again in public houses which have no vaults attached to them the number of robberies committed in the vaults bears the proportion of 18 per cent on the number of houses, whilst the robberies which have been committed in the tap, bar and other parts of house have not amounted to more than 12 per cent.

It appears that the largest number of apprehensions have been made from the class of persons having no trade and reputed thieves, from prostitutes the next largest:- labourers the next in number, and then weavers and piecers, of the remaining description of trades (of which forty seven different classes are enumerated in the trade tables) no especial large numbers of prisoners belong to any particular trade.

As respects the amount of money which has been stolen during the year as stated in the Felony Table it will appear ( as has been the case in previous years) that the sum stolen during the day, that is between the hours of six o'clock in the morning and nine o'clock in the evening , has been infinitely larger than during the night. It is obvious that the presenting of forged bills or acceptances and the purloining of goods from warehouses and shops when open can only take place by day, and as regards the forging of bills, a sum of considerable amount is included in the money reported to have been stolen, in the present returns.

In all the above name class of robbers the police have little powers of prevention but I am happy to say that they have nevertheless been very successful in recovering property, for out of a sum of about £12,279 reported to have been stolen, the sum of £6,725 has been recovered through the instrumentality of the Police, and the Police have recovered from property accidentally lost by the public the sum of £1293, although information was given by to the Police in regard to £622 only as accidentally lost.

Of the prisoners transported during the year and amounting to 54 males and 16 females it will be seen on reference to table no 36 that two only of the whole number were well educated, that 49 were only very imperfectly educated, and that 19 were found to have no education at all : that 27 persons were under 20 of age, 29 between the ages of 20 and 30 years, 9 between 30 and 40 years, and 5 between 40 and 50 years.

As regards the miscellaneous returns there are many tables containing much interesting and important information and to some it it may be desirable to make reference.

The table of fires gives a detailed account of the manner in which all have occurred within the Borough during the year and have been extinguished; the number and description of each class of building which has been on fire, the description of the various kinds of property which has been burnt, the amount of damage done both to the buildings and property contained therein, the amount of property saved , the number of buildings and the amount of property insured and uninsured with other particulars as to the attendance of the engines, Firemen and Police, and the supposed origin or cause of the fires &c.

It will be satisfactory to observe that the total amount of damage to property and buildings arising from 112 fire which have occurred is only estimated at £ 42,633 11s 6d viz:- £10,459 10s 6d for damage to buildings and £32,194 1s 0d for damage to property, and that the salvage of property which has been in danger has amounted to an estimated £156,125 4s 8d. The return further gives an account of three other fires which were attended by the Fire Brigade beyond the limits of the Borough.

In the next table it will be observed that during the 2469 premises were found insecure by the Police at night, of which 1319 containing property were left quite unprotected, without any persons residing on the premises, and 683 other premises containing property with persons residing on the premises: which may be have said to have been equally liable to robbery as the residents had retired to rest when the Constables found the building in an insecure state. The same table also contains an account of 4348 children lost in the streets , of whom 2064 were restored to their parents by the Police:- also a statement of the money taken for safety from drunken persons whilst in charge of the Police amounting to £925 7s 11d, which is less by £670 than the amount taken for persons under similar circumstances in the previous year, arising probably, partly from the depressed state of trade, and partly from an improvement in the morals of the people.

As respect to the conduct of the public houses it is gratifying to be able to state that the reports are considerably fewer than they were in the previous year, being as 68 to 114, and the amount of penalties £53 13s 0d to £70 17s 0d.

The same results also appear in regards to beerhouses, as the complaints are 47 fewer, and the amount of penalties £22 13 0d less than they were in the year 1846.

There can be no doubt whatsoever that there has been considerably less drunkenness within the Borough during the past year than in previous years as I feel assured could be satisfactorily proved by the public, by the landlords of public houses and beerhouses as well as by officers of the Police.

As respect to offences against the Local acts there appear to have been 3373 cases reported by the Police, and 3233 persons summonsed before the Committee,- that 39 only of the cases were not proved , and that the fines imposed amounted to £264 8s 6d. Of unsound meat the Superintendents of Police have seized 4494 lbs weight which has been destroyed, and the penalties which have been inflicted for offering meat of the above description for sale have amounted with the costs to upwards of £21.

In effecting sanitary improvements in the dwellings of the poorer classes the Police have been extremely active as will be seen by reference to tables nos 43 and 44.

Between 7th May and 12th October when the Cow Fever was so prevalent in consequence of the great influx of poor and destitute Irish, and when so many deaths were continually occurring, the eight officers who were appointed to this duty visited no less than 1882 dwelling houses of the poor, and caused 818 to be cleansed and whitewashed, 1568 cases of illness and 3711 cases of destitution were reported by the Officers to the Guardians of which latter number 3627 of the cases consisted of persons who were found destitute when visited at the residences and the remainder of persons who were found destitute in the streets.

The Police were also enabled by means of a small sum of £50 which was placed for that purpose by a number of benevolent individuals at the disposal of the Chief Constable to afford relief to many parties found to be in such extreme want as to require immediate nourishment and unable to wait until their case could be reported to the Board of Guardians, not fewer than 1128 families or 3063 persons including the children were thus timely assisted by the Police. In all such cases the provisions were purchased and taken to the dwellings of the destitute by the Officers and an entry made in the visiting book of the name and address and number of the family relieved with the quantity and amount of provisions supplied.

I feel assured that much good was effected by thus dispensing funds placed at my disposal, and in some instances there is no doubt that life was preserved by the timely relief afforded by the Police. The Officers have several times reported having found the poor persons whom they visited and relieved, in the most abject condition and in such a state of exhaustion from the want of food, as to render it physically impossible for them to have gone any distance in order to obtain relief.

The system which was under the sanction of the Committee adopted of visiting the poor at their dwellings was doubtless the means of affording required assistance to many of that class of distressed and deserving families which it is much to be feared at all times especially in times of extraordinary pressure are if sought for to be found patiently suffering extreme privations and yet deterred from appearing before the Guardians of the Poor for relief or from obtruding themselves before the public as beggars in the streets.

The very deficient supply of water which is so necessary for the promotion of cleanliness will be seen from table no 46 the particulars were contained in which obtained in December 1846. It appears that very nearly one half of the total number of houses within the City (sic) were at the time of making out the return altogether unsupplied with pipe water either within the houses or from taps in the street, and that less than one fourth of the houses were supplied with pipe water in the interiors.

It will be seen from table no 48 that that the total number of dwelling houses within the borough on the last day of December 1847 was 49,022, being an increase on the number reported in the previous year notwithstanding the great depression in trade of 1699 dwelling houses. The number of houses however which were uninhabited when the return was taken amounted to 2537, being as compared with the return of the previous year, an increase of 1692.

The dwelling cellars appear to have been less in number than they were in the previous year , and more cellars are also reported to have been uninhabited when the returns were taken.

As respects the population although the average number computed for each house might in some districts be safely increased in consequence of the increase in the number of families who have been induced or compelled by the pressure of the times to live together in one dwelling house, it has been thought better to adhere to the plan hitherto adopted and to take the same average number for each house in computing the present population. To make any change unless great pains were taken to ascertain the numbers, would probably cause considerable confusion.

The average number therefore residing in each dwelling house as been taken as in previous years, and makes the population of the Borough amount to 299,445 persons being only a slight increase of the number of the population as given in the returns for the yeas 1846.

It affords me great pleasure to be able to speak in strong terms of commendation of the general conduct of the Police. They has discharged the arduous duties which have devolved upon them with great efficiency and at the same time with so much consideration and forbearance as to secure for them not only the approval of their superior Officers but also the good will and kindly feeling of the inhabitants.

The truth of this gratifying statement will be abundantly proved by the fact that during the year only 22 reports and most of them as a slight character have been preferred against the police by the inhabitants.

Of the 84 voluntary resignations which have taken place during the year no less than 57 of the Officers and the Consumables have resigned to accept better situations to which they were specially recommended to parties applying to me for trustworthy Officers, some to obtain situations of their own seeking and others in consequence of the duties being more onerous than they could bear.

In conclusion I have merely to add that every endeavour has been made to economise the expenditure as far as was consistent with a due regard to preserving the efficiency of the Force, and I am happy in being able to state that although extra expenses amounting to about £150 were incurred in the months of May and June in 1847 in consequence of the Force being increased by a few additional men during the period when so many persons were out of employ and when some slight disagreement existed between one or two of the mill owners and the persons in their employ, - the expense has not exceeded the amount of the estimate , and that the average cost per head has only amounted to £51 2s 9d being the lowest average expended in any previous year.

As the preceding report refers entirely to the returns bearing upon crime and other circumstances which have occurred during the year 1847, I have not thought it advisable to refer particularly to the occurrences which have lately taken place, or the attempt made on the 8th March last by some evil disposed person to disrupt the peace of the city. These matters will form the subject of notice in a future report, but it may not be out of place to remark that however much the vigilance and energy displayed by the Police may have been instrumental in suppressing the disturbances, it is to the determination exhibited by the operatives in the mills not only not to join in the movement but to assist their Masters in protecting their property and resisting aggression that we are largely indebted for the maintenance of peace and order. I refer with satisfaction to the praiseworthy and creditable conduct of the operatives as affording additional proof of their increased intelligence and as a further confirmation of the correctness of the opinions I have expressed that the more intelligent the people become, the more disposed will they be to assist in the maintenance of peace.

Edward Willis

Chief Constable.


Meeting 4th May 1848

Resolved

That the following estimate of pay to the extra number of supernumeraries employed in consequence of the later disturbances for the week ending May 2nd be, and is hereby approved of; and that a copy of the same signed by the Chairman be transmitted to the Finance Committee.


A Division

£9 7s 0d

B Division

£19 13s 11d

C Division

£20 8s 5d

D Division

£10 13s 7d

Total = £60 2s 4d


Resolved

That Charles Hughes having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed a Police Constable.


Resolved

That Police Constable A30 Thomas Flanagan having appeared before the Committee is appointed Sub Inspector at the wages of 25/- per week.


Public Urinals

The following Memorandum from the minutes of the Building and Sanitary Regulations Committee proceedings on May 3rd inst.:

That the Watch Committee be respectfully requested to give directions to the Police Officers to prevent as far as practicable, damage to, or any improper use of the public urinals within the Borough , and that a list of the same be transmitted to the Chief Constable.”


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be instructed to comply , as far as practicable, with the request of the Building and Sanitary Regulations Committee.


Meeting 11th May 1848

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

Thomas Houghland and James Whitelegg.


Meeting 18th May 1848

Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the Finance Committee's proceedings was read:

That the Watch Committee be requested to appoint and swear in as a Constable William Smith, Messenger for the purpose of enabling him to serve the summonses and warrants obtained for the recovery of Police rates and Gas Rates.


Memorandum

William Smith, Messenger appeared before the Committee and was appointed and sworn in to act as a Constable.


Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the Nuisance Committee's proceedings was read:

Mr George Peacock, Shopkeeper of nos 53 and 55 Deansgate attended and complained of great annoyance from the hawkers of oranges who congregate in that thoroughfare and impede the free passage of the public. It was also reported by the Superintendent that parties resident in other public thoroughfares were much annoyed by a similar nuisance.

Resolved:

That the Watch Committee be respectfully requested to instruct Police Officers to prevent the nuisance complained of, and to take the parties found offending before the Magistrates


Resolved

That the consideration of the above be postponed until the next meeting.


Meeting 25th May 1848


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: Charles [Davis],

Henry White, John Hartley and John Iredale.


Memorandum

Last weeks request fro the Nuisance Committee was again read and considered.

Resolved

That the Nuisance committee be informed...that, whilst the Committee are desirous of affording, through the Police Constables all the assistance which may be desired in preventing obstructions and other annoyances in the streets, it appears to this Committee desirable that all offences of this description should be as heretofore reported by the Police Officers to the Nuisance Committee, and be dealt with by the Superintendent of department in such way as the Nuisance Committee, to whom this duty has been specially referred by the Council, shall direct.


Meeting 8th June 1848

Resolved

That the following Police Constables having performed the duty of Sub Inspector to the satisfaction of the Chief Constable be and hereby appointed Sub Inspectors at the wages of 25/- per week:

No 3 D Edward Harwood

No 68 D Samuel Gratrix

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: Thomas Brunt, John Goodwin, Daniel Gratrix and John Leach.

Memorandum

The offences reported and fines imposed by the Chief Constable were read out.


Resolved

That in consideration of the extra services performed by the Police during the past week and of their generally meritorious conduct, the fines imposed by Captain Willis for the offences reported, with the exception of that upon Thomas Downing C 83, be altogether remitted, and that the fine of 7/6 imposed upon such last named Constable for drunkenness be reduced to 5/-.


Meeting 22nd June 1848

Statistical Returns

Resolved

That the sum of £20 be allowed and paid to Mr McDonald, Inspector in the Police Force in consideration of the extra time devoted by him in preparing and superintending the printing of the statistical returns for the past year.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

William Cockcroft, Thomas Pollard, James Huly, and Aaron Hodgson.


Meeting 29th June 1848

Resolved

That Police Constable A 33 James Lumb having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Sub Inspector at the wages of 25/- per week


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

Samuel Wood, Thomas Hadfield, William Lythgoe, Samuel Gough, John Pearson, and John Price.



Meeting 13th July 1848

Weights and Measures Department

Memorandum

The following extracts from the minutes of the proceedings of the General Purposes Committee on the 7th July inst.

The Mayor reported that the two Outdoor Inspectors had been appointed at £120 per annum each, and that the system was now working very satisfactorily, and suggested the propriety of placing the department under the control of the Watch Committee, as the Justices were desirous that such an arrangement should be made by the Council.

Resolved

That the extract read above be referred to the Chief Constable with instructions to report at the next the meeting the arrangements necessary for carrying out the resolution of the General Purposes Committee.

Police Library

Memorandum

The Chief Constable has pleasure in informing the Committee that he has received from Mr George Peel, a present for the Police Library of a work entitled Chamber's Miscellany consisting of ten volumes. And also a present from Mr Joseph Peel of Shakespeare's Life and Works, Modern Travels and other works consisting altogether of seventeen volumes.

Resolved

That the Chief Constable be requested to communicate the best thanks of this Committee to Messrs Peel for their liberal presents to the Police Library.


Meeting 20th July 1848

Smoke Inspectors

Memorandum

The Chief Constable begs to inform the Watch Committee that Inspector Fox has requested him to mention to the Committee that he should prefer remaining in the Police Force to taking the Office of Inspector of the Smoke Nuisance as he is now receiving the same salary as proposed with the chance of promotion which he would not possess in the situation afforded.

Resolved

That a copy of the above be transmitted to the Nuisance Committee.

Weights and Measures

Memorandum

The Chief Constable begs to inform the Committee that he has examined so far so far as the time would permit him to do so, into the working detail of the Weights and Measures Department and is of [the] opinion that the system as arrange under Mr Mellor's direction is satisfactorily managed and work advantageously , and that the books are well formed and contain information on all points both as to the duties performed by Officers of the Department and the money that has been charged and received for regulating and stamping the Weights and Measures which have been found defective or which have been brought to the Office to be adjusted to the standard.

The Chief Constable cannot on such a short insight into the system of the department say at present whether any alteration may be advisable hereafter, but he will look more closely into the working detail, and if any improvement should suggest itself he will name it to the Committee.

The Chief Constable would recommend that Mr Mellor, the Chief Inspector of the Department, be instructed to attend the weekly meeting of the Watch Committee, and that he also be required to submit for the inspection of the Committee a report of the duties performed during the week as detailed in the books now in use which are submitted for the inspection of the Committee.

Resolved

That the above is hereby approved of and adopted, and that the Chief Constable be directed to carry out the recommendations therein contained.

Resolved

That Sub Inspector John Jones of the A Division having discharged the duty of Inspector to the satisfaction of the Chief Constable be, and is hereby appointed Inspector at the wages of 30/- per week.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: William Mould, Edward Craven and John Grundy.

Memorandum

Letter read from Mr John Hardman, Solicitor to the Rochdale Canal Company requesting the assistance of the Police to prevent bathing and depredations on the banks of the canal.

Letter also read from Mr Joshua Lee requesting that the Police might be instructed to prevent the assembling of disorderly persons in Goulden Street who by throwing balls, stones &c, damage the property there.

Resolved

That the above letters be referred to the Chief Constable with authority to give such directions as he may deem desirable the nuisances complained of.


Meeting 27th July 1848

Memorandum

The following resolution of a meeting of the Borough on 26th July instant was read: That in the peculiar state of the Borough it is expedient in the opinion of this meeting that the Police Force be immediately increased, and that a recommendation be made to the Watch Committee to increase the Force by the addition of 200 men.

Resolution

That it is desirable to appoint temporarily and with as little delay as possible two hundred supernumerary Constables to act with the regular Force in case of need, and that the Chief Constable be authorised and directed to engage that number of men, reporting when the opportunity offers to this Committee.

Resolved

That the Chief Constable be authorised to obtain 200 collar badges for the extra number of men engaged.


Meeting 3rd August 1848

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

Robert Hughes, Joseph Sykes, George Lees, Paul Ord, Thomas Wilson, Thomas Smith, John Torr, Joseph Newbold and John Hambleton.

Memorandum

Letter read dated 2nd August instant from Messrs Lees and Saul, Churchwardens of St Thomas's Church, Ardwick offering with the concurrence of the Rev N W Gibson MA incumbent, a set in the Churchwardens' Pew for the use of the Superintendent of the C Division of Police.

Resolved

That the best thanks of this Committee be tendered to the Churchwardens and the Rev N W Gibson MA incumbent of St Thomas's Church, Ardwick for their courteous offer of a seat in the Churchwardens' Pew for the Superintendent of the C Division of the Police.

Chorlton upon Medlock D Division Station

Memorandum

Mr Shorland submitted an estimate of the expense of making certain alterations at this station for providing increased accommodation for the assembling and parading of the Constables, and which alterations had been approved of by the Chorlton upon Medlock Committee, subject to this Committee making the same at their own expense.



Meeting 17th August 1848

Resolved

That Thomas Nevet having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed a Police Constable.

Memorandum

Memorial read from the owners and occupiers of premises in Little Lever Street and the neighbourhood calling the attention of the Committee to the annoyance they suffer from the assembling in that neighbourhood of very low characters, and, requesting the interference of the Police to prevent the same.

Resolved

That the Chief Constable be requested to place such numbers of extra men on the beats in this neighbourhood as will prevail to prevent the annoyance complained of.


Meeting 24th August 1848


Memorandum

Memorial read from the inhabitants of Spinning Field and neighbourhood complaining of disorderly conduct in a house on that street, and requesting the Committee to interfere to prevent the same.

Resolved

That the above be referred to the Chief Constable with instructions to do what he may consider necessary in the matter.


Meeting 7th September 1848

Resolved

That in accordance with the recommendation of the Chief Constable the following Police Constables be promoted to the Merit Class: C 33 Richard Lalor and C 87 John Cookson.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

George Lowe, Edward Lees and John Holroyd.


Meeting 21st September 1848

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

John Gledhill and James Sanderson


Meeting 28th September 1848

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

Charles Allcock, George Trigg, Charles Newsome Thwaite, George Bramwell and Ephraim Brears.


Meeting 5th October 1848

Resolved

That in accordance with the recommendation of the Chief Constable the following Police Constables have been awarded the Merit Class: D 46 David read; D 35 William Sutton and D 87 Joseph Fenton.

Resolved

That the following parities having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:William Taylor; Benjamin Tempest;Thomas Orme and William Bonsar.

Memorandum

The following letter was read out:

At a meeting of Gentlemen deputed by the Board of Guardians of the Manchester Union and the Sanitary Committee of the Town council held at the Town Hall, Manchester on Saturday the thirteenth day of September 1848 for the purpose of considering the steps necessary to be taken with reference to the approach of the Asiatic Cholera.

The following Resolutions were unanimously passed:

That the Mayor be requested to communicate with Her Majesty's Privy Council with a view to immediately enforcing in this locality “The Nuisances Removal and Diseases Prevention Prevention Act 1848” by which Act the Privy Council on the approach of any contagious or epidemic disorder are authorised to issue certain orders to Boards of Guardians and others for carrying into effect the sanitary measures therein provided for.

That the attention of the Watch Committee and of the Nuisance, Scavenging and Sanitary Committees of the Council be respectfully and urgently called to the propriety of immediately taking all such steps as they may deem expedient and practicable in exercise of the various provisions of the Manchester Improvement Act entrusted in such Committees of the general sanitary condition of this Borough.

Memorandum

It was stated that the Guardians would provide labourers to assist in carrying out the regulations relative to the clearance of Lodging Houses.


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be instructed to take such steps as may be necessary for properly cleansing and whitewashing the Lodging Houses throughout the Borough and to avail himself of the assistance offered by the Guardians in providing labourers for such purposes.

Resolved

That the Chairman and the Mayor be deputed to wait upon the Board of Guardians to call their attention to the several cases of persons reported by the Police have been refused admission to the Workhouse although in a state of great destitution.

Memorandum

The Chief Constable reported that in consequence of the great increase of streets and buildings and of population in the Borough during the last three or four years (since the extension of the police Force) the Constables' Beats in many parts of the Borough were become disproportionately large and the security for persons and property in those districts considerably impaired.

Resolved

That the Chief Constable be requested to report to this Committee the increase of streets and new buildings in the several divisions of the Borough, and the number of men required in his opinion to afford adequate protection of the public.


Meeting 12th October 1848

Memorandum

The following was extract from the minutes of the Lamp and Scavenging Committee's proceedings on the 10th instant were read out:

That the Watch Committee be respectfully requested to direct their Officers to report to this Department all ashpits which require emptying in order to prevent any unnecessary accumulation of filth within the Borough.

Resolved

That the Chief Constable be instructed to comply with the request of the Lamp and Scavenging Committee contained, in the Resolution now read , which is understood to apply to Public Ashpits only.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: John Cottingham and John Platt.


Meeting 19th October 1848

Memorandum

The Chairman and the Mayor reported, that they had, with the Chief Constable, an interview with the Board of Guardians on the 12th October instant, and that called to the attention of the Board to the several cases of destitute persons found in the streets by Police Officers, and who upon being taken to the Workhouse, were refused admittance, and the Guardians at once undertook to make provisions for receiving into the Workhouse any persons who may hereafter be found in the streets in a state of destitution.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: Thomas Thacker and William Arrowsmith.


Meeting 26th October 1848

Resolved

That Sub Inspector John Hall A Division having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Inspector at the wage of 30/- per week.

Resolved

That the following Police Constables having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Sub Inspectors at the wages of 25/- per week:

PC 52 William Barker Cassom, B Division

PC 1 Charles Wilson

PC 68 Henry Duckworth

PC 2 Joseph Platt C Division

PC 43 John Gee

PC 24 Thomas Riley


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:



John Nixon

Thomas McKenzie

George Mitchell Dyson

David Fletcher (B)

Charles Radcliffe

John Milne Tate

Charles Hirst

William Matthews

David Fletcher (C)

Thomas Newton



Meeting 2nd November 1848

Resolved

That William Stubbs having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed a Police Constable.


Meeting 9th November 1848

Memorandum

The following letter was read out:

27th October 1848

Sir ,

Permit me to inform you that arrangements have been made whereby females and children , being tramps, can now be admitted to the Tib Street Vagrant Ward. The arrangements for for the accommodation of the men are progressing as rapidly as possible, and on the completion thereof intimation shall be forwarded to you. I beg further to inform you that the Guardians have communicated with the Poor Law Board on the subject of the employment of persons in the receipt of Relief in whitewashing and cleaning the dwellings of the poor, and it appears that at present the Guardians can not legally call upon such persons to perform such labour except to a limited extent.

Jno Harrop

Clerk to the Guardians.


Meeting 16th November 1848

Memorandum

The following letter was read out:

Manchester Union

Nov 9th 1848

Sir,

I am directed by the Guardians of the Manchester Union to intimate to you that accommodation is now provided for males and females in the Vagrant Wards of the Union in Tib Street, and that the Guardians considerate desirable that a Policeman be placed there during the night, as at the Night Asylum .

Jno Harrop

Clerk to the Guardians


Town Hall Manchester 11th November 1848

Sir,

I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 9th informing me of the arrangements that have been made by the Guardians fro the accommodation of male and female vagrants in the workhouse in Tib Street and requesting me to grant the services of a Police Constable to maintain order during the night. I shall not be able to grant you the exclusive services of a Police Constable except with the sanction of the Watch Committee, as it would oblige me to detach a man from one of the appointed beats, but I will lay your letter before the Committee at their next meeting, and in the meantime give directions that the Constable on the beat in Tib Street shall visit the workhouse whilst taking his round of duty throughout the night.

Edward Willis,

Chief Constable


Meeting November 23rd 1848

Resolved

That in accordance with the recommendation of the Chief Constable John Olive is hereby promoted to the Merit Class.

Vagrancy &c

Resolved

That the letter addressed by the Chief Constable to the Clerk of the Board of Guardians dated November 11th and submitted at the last meeting be approved of: and that he be instructed, again to mention the subject, if the arrangement made is not considered satisfactory by the Board.

Memorandum

Letter read from the Clerk of the Board of Guardians, enclosing letter from Thomas Heaton containing a complaint against Officers of the A Division.

Resolved

That the Board of Guardians be informed by the Chief Constable that the complaint made by Heaton has been enquired into and dismissed as utterly groundless; it being clearly proved that whilst Heaton conducted himself improperly at the office, the Officer on duty civilly informed him that without the authority of the Chief Constable or the Superintendent, he had no power to send a Constable to remain at the Tib Street Asylum.


Meeting 30th November 1848

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

Abraham Haigh, Uriah Booth, Charles Ross, Thomas Moores and Thomas Withers.


Meeting 21st December 1848


Memorandum

Mr Foulkes attended on behalf of the Trustees of the late Duke of Bridgewater and presented the following request;

To Her Majesty's Justices of the Peace acting and for the Incorporated Borough of Manchester in the County of Lancaster and also the Watch Committee of the said Borough:-

I the undersigned being an agent and duly authorised by the Trustees appointed in pursuance of the last Will and Testament of the most noble Francis the late Duke of Bridgewater, and proprietors of Bridgewater Canal and the Mersey and Irwell Navigation situate lying and being within the said Borough and (acting in management of the Canal and Navigation affairs of the said proprietors) do hereby respectfully request you the said Justices or any two of you or the said Watch Committee to appoint George Palmer aged 40, Edward Wilson aged 53, George Dandy aged 40 and Nicholas Holloway aged 48 as Constables on and along the Bridgewater Canal and such part of the River Medlock as is navigable and connected with the said Canal; and John Hindley aged 34, John Smith aged 64, Abraham Ogden aged 55 and John Rawlinson aged 37 to be Constables on and along the Mersey and Irwell Navigation so far as it lies within the said Borough, pursuant to the provisions of an Act of Parliament passed in the 3rd and 4th years of the present Reign, Chapter 50, entitled “An Act to Provide for Keeping the Peace on Canal and Navigable Rivers”, And I hereby as such agent undertake on behalf of the said proprietors to pay every such Constable such salaries and allowances and at such time and in such manner as the said proprietors shall think fit. As witness my hand the 20th day of December 1848.

George Marsden


Memorandum

In compliance with the application made on behalf of the Trustees of the late Duke of Bridgewater. The following parties; George Palmer, Edward Wilson, George Dandy and Nicholas Holloway having appeared before the Committee were duly appointed and sworn in as Constables to act on and along the Bridgewater Canal and such part of the River Medlock as is navigable and connected with the said Canal; and also the following parties John Hindley, John Smith, Abrahan Ogden and John Rawlinson having also appeared before the Committee were duly appointed and sworn in as Constables to act on and along the Mersey and Irwell Navigation so far as it lies within the said Borough, under and by virtue of the powers contained in the Act of Parliament passed in the 3rd and 4th years of the present Reign, Chapter 50, entitled “An Act to Provide for Keeping the Peace on Canal and Navigable Rivers”.


Memorandum

The following letter from the Manchester Union was read out:

Manchester, 20th December 1848


Sir,

I beg to inform the Watch Committee of the Town Council of the Borough of Manchester that Christopher Steele who was during the earlier part of the present year sworn in as a Constable of the Borough, at the request of the Board of Guardians in whose employ he then was, is no longer the servant of the Manchester Union.

Jno Harrop

Clerk to the Board

Memorandum

A memorial from William Palmer Beerhouse Keeper in Rochdale Road complaining of interference with his business on the part of the Police having been read.

Resolved

That the Chief Constable inform William Palmer that this Committee decline to interfere in anyway in reference to the matters alleged in his memorial , and inform him that the Police have positive orders to prevent any violations of the Law by the Beersellers, and to report every offence committed by William Palmer, and that if he has any defence to offer, he has the opportunity of submitting his evidence to the Justices.


Meeting 28th December 1848

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: William Oakley, Thomas Greenwood , Samuel Broadhurst and Joseph Arlom.

 

Meeting 18th January 1849


Resolved

That the following persons having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables: William Handley, Amos Hartley, John Cullen and John Long.


Meeting 25th January 1849


Police Reward and Benefit Fund

The Chief Constable submitted the following rules for regulating the distribution of this fund fro the approval of the Committee prior to the same being transmitted for enrolment to Mr [Tidd] Pratt, the barrister appointed to certify rules for benefit societies:

This Benefit Fund is established under the direction of the Watch Committee of the Borough of Manchester for the purpose of granting rewards and gratuities to the Officers and Constables of the Police Force for meritorious conduct, for relieving the widows and families of any of the Police whom may be in distress, and for granting donations to all other persons who may either render service to the Police or become injured in rendering assistance and for such other beneficial purposes as may be considered desirable by the watch Committee for the time being.

The Fund is derived from the fines imposed on Officers and Constables of the Police Force for misconduct, from grants made to the Watch Committee, and from sums received from private individuals.


Rules

All members of the Police Force who may distinguished themselves, or performed any duties in a very zealous and efficient manner, or who may have received injuries in the service, to be eligible, to be rewarded in such manner as the Watch Committee may direct.

All members of the Force who from sickness or other causes may be incapacitated from doing their duty or remaining in the service will be eligible to receive such sums from the fund as the Watch committee may consider requisite.

The wives, widows or children of all Police Constables to be eligible to receive such rewards or sums of money, from the Fund as the Committee may consider their several circumstances call for.

All persons who may have rendered special services to the Police or who may have received injuries in assisting them, to be eligible to be rewarded in such manner as the Committee may deem necessary.

The Watch Committee for the time being reserve to themselves the right of disposing of the Fund in such manner as they may direct through the Treasurer.

The Chief Constable is appointed Treasurer of the Reward Fund with power to administer the same under the direction of the Watch Committee.


Meeting 8th February 1849


Resolved

That Mr Joseph Fox having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Inspector at the wage of 30/- per week.


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables: Samuel Cropper and William Bairstow.


Memorandum

The following extract from a letter from the Lords of the Treasury was read:

Conveyance of Convicts

I am at the same time to state to you that experience has shown that in all cases, fixed allowances are in opposition to the public interests, and that their Lordships cannot in future allow out of the Grant of Parliament any amount for the conveyancing of convicts beyond what is actually and fairly incurred and paid, and they desire therefore that all accounts hereafter to be rendered to this Board may show the following particulars, namely

The date of each conveyance.

The name of each convict.

The place where conveyed.

The amount paid for, and the mode of conveyance, as well as the number of Officers accompanying the convicts.

The amount, if any, paid to such Officers for their time.

The amount paid for subsistence of Officers and convicts, and the time occupied in their removal, and whether the Officers receive fixed salaries for their services.

My Lords are of the opinion that in all cases where Officers are in receipt of a salary, the actual expenses incurred only should be allowed.

I am also to acquaint you that unless these expenses are regulated with the strictest economy, they will hereafter disallowed.


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be instructed to make arrangements for conveying convicts to the Depot at Mill Bank in charge of Officers of the Police Force, and not to contract with other parties, as required by the Lords of Her Majesty's Treasury.


Meeting 15th February 1849


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables: Thomas B Turner, Robert Pedley and William Kelsey.


Meeting 1st March 1849


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables; George Lees, Samuel Hindlow and David Jackson.


Memorandum

The following report was read:

The Chief Superintendent begs to represent that at present serious inconvenience is felt at the Borough Court in consequence of there being only one water closet. It is situate between the Barristers' robing room and the Grand Jury room. The Barristers frequently find the place occupied by Police Officers or (when they can obtain admittance) witnesses. There is a water closet at the back of the Commercial Inn, and the Police often go into it; the only entrance being through the front door of the house, leaving an impression upon people's minds that the Police are entering the house for another purpose. Taking this circumstances into consideration the Chief Superintendent begs to recommend that another water closet be constructed to meet the necessities of the large number of persons who have to attend the daily court and the Sessions when holding.


Meeting 8th March 1849

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables: Jabez Sykes, James Jackson and William Tatton.


Meeting 22nd March 1849

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables: George Richards and George Yarwood.


Meeting 29th March 1849


Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the proceedings of the Public Parks Committee on 23rd march was read:

That the watch Committee be requested to swear in as Police Constables the following parties employed as Park keepers: Lawrence Densey and James Smith.


The parties name in the above having appeared before the Committee were sworn in to act as Constables.


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables: William Harribin, John Smith and Joshua Hall.


Meeting 5th April 1849


Memorandum

A deposition consisting of Messrs Bake, Black, Lawton and Jolly, Licensed Victuallers and Mr John Redford, Secretary to the Licensed Victuallers Association attended and presented the following memorial to the Committee.


To the Chairman and Members of the Watch Committee of the Corporation of the City of Manchester*.

The memorial of the undersigned on behalf of the Manchester and Salford Licensed Victuallers Association most respectfully sheweth

That the Law requires the houses of all Licensed Victuallers to remain closed from from twelve o'clock each Saturday night until half past twelve on Sunday (the following day) it is fully expected that every member of the Association strictly adhere thereto, nevertheless have not only been informed, but they have also witnessed a very great number of intoxicated persons in the streets during the hours above referred to, and on making enquiries as to the cause, they have good reason for believing that it arises from an extensive making and selling of illicit spirits which have latterly been much upon the increase in consequence of the Excisemen not having the same inducement now to exert themselves in bringing such offenders to justice – formerly they were allowed one half of the penalty inflicted on conviction – now they have to pay all costs from their own pockets, nor are the Police empowered to interfere without special warrants granted by the Board of Excise and which has lately been done under similar circumstances on the application the authorities of Ashton under Lyne. Your Memoralists therefore respectfully submit the the Licensed Victuallers are not only great sufferers in a pecuniary point of view, but also in the estimation of the authorities and the respectable portion of inhabitants of this City* by such practices being allowed to exist they therefore most respectfully beg that you will be pleased to make application for such powers as will enable the Police effectively to put down all such illicit practices and your Memorialist will ever feel obliged.

Dated 4th day April 1849


Resolved

That the further consideration of the Memorial be postponed until the next meeting.


Resolved

That the Town Clerk be prepared to report at the next meeting as to the actual position in which this matter now stands, so far as regards the suppression of “illicit distillation”.


Meeting 12th April 1849


Memorandum

The Chief Constable begs to inform the Committee that in consequence of the inhabitants of the township of Cheetham having frequently complained of the disadvantages of which they experience in having no Police Station which they can refer to nearer that the one in Oldham Road, and as inconvenience also arise in the administration of the duties of the Police from the great distance which the Constables have to travel before they arrive on the beats situate in the neighbourhood of Cheetham Hill which are upwards of two miles from the Station, the Chief Constable proposes that a small house in which a married Constable and four single Constables could be accommodated should be taken as a residence for the men comprising the section who do duty in that district. The Chief Constable has inspected a house which would do for the purpose, and the only expense which the Committee would have to incur would be about £6, for some repairs and fittings; and an annual sum of £7 for the balance of rent and taxes above what would be charged to the Constables. The arrangement although not a perfect one would give the inhabitants the advantages which a Station afford with the exception of not being a place of detention for prisoners and without increasing the number of Police or incurring any additional expense beyond the trifling sum of £7 per annum.


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be authorised to take the premises referred to in his report, and get the same fitted up for the purposes of a Police Station at an expense not to exceed £10.


Meeting 19th April 1849


Illicit Distillation Report

The Town Clerk reports that he and the Chief Constable accompanied by Mr Alderman Neild went to see Mr Kelly the Collector of Excise. That Mr Kelly stated that so far from the inducement to activity and exertion on the part of the Excise Officers having been lessened by the change in the Law, it is in his opinion increased; that although formerly the Officers had a legal claim to half the penalty, in the case of private distillation they rarely obtained anything as the parties were generally too poor to pay the penalties imposed; that now a reward is in all cases paid, over and above the expenses incurred, by order of the Treasury.

Mr Kelly further stated that the Excise Officers themselves are required to obtain a warrant from the Justices before entering premises for the purpose of searching and seizing, and that in his opinion the assistance of the Police could not more effectively be given in detecting illicit distillation than is now afforded. The Town Clerk with the sanction and approval of the Chairman suggested that no advantage whatsoever would be secured by obtaining Excise Warrants in favour of a number of the Police Officers.

That information can be communicated as soon to an Excise Officer as to one of the Police Officers holding the warrant if obtained, and as the Board in London requires a warrant to be obtained also from the Justices it is much better that such warrants should be applied for by the Excise Officers themselves than by any member of the Police Force. Mr Kelly admitted that the increase of private distillations although not in his opinion within the Borough where they were so closely watched by the Police and expressed his anxiety to receive and act upon all information could be given by the Police.


Resolved

That the above be approved and adopted by the Committee.


Resolved

That the Chairman be required to communicate the determination of this Committee to Licensed Victuallers Association.


Criminal Statistics


Gentlemen,

It is gratifying to me to present for your consideration and approval returns which will bear satisfactorily with the returns of other years, and which afford strong evidence that the high character of which Manchester has obtained for the orderly and peaceable conduct of the inhabitants and particularly of the operative population is well deserved and likely to be fully maintained. In presenting these returns it is impossible to avoid referring with pride and satisfaction to the state of this Borough , during that period of excitement and anxiety which occurred in the past year.

Slight disturbances did certainly take place, but when all circumstances are considered it will be I think generally felt that it is

scarcely possible to stronger or more satisfactory evidence that of the general intelligence and loyal and peaceable character of the population around us than was afforded by the events which occurred during the period referred to. Whilst greatly acknowledging (as one having some degree of official responsibility in the maintenance of order) the firmness, vigilance and watchful care manifested for the preservation of the peace by the Mayor and Magistrates, the active organisation of districts by committees of the Council , and the liberality of body in granting efficient assistance to the ordinary police, as also the invaluable co-operation and assistance so readily afforded by the owners of warehouses, shops, and property, and by those in their employ. I venture to suggest that this Borough was indebted to a still larger extent to the working classes and mill operatives, for the maintenance of order.

To that important class for their expressive disapproval of, and absence of any sympathy with the proceedings of the few disorderly and disaffected individuals who sought to create disturbance, for their determination to continue at their ordinary employment and to resist any attempt at interference; and for the promptitude with which they at once agreed to be associated for the protection of property of their employers, we are unquestionably indebted more than to any other source for the success which happily crowned the efforts of the Authorities to preserve the peace and to protect property within this Borough, during a period of almost unprecedented excitement and alarm and of great privations and distress. Of the conduct of the Police Force during such period, I feel that it is scarcely possible to speak in terms too strong and I have much pleasure in bearing testimony to their praiseworthy behaviour and to their zeal and patience exhibited when called upon to perform extraordinary and most onerous duties.

In regard to the criminal portions of the returns, it is satisfactory to observe that, notwithstanding the excitement and depression in Trade which existed during the greater part of the last year, the apprehensions are fewer by about 300 persons; than they were in the year 1847, when the number of persons taken into custody were less than any previous year, and fewer by upwards of 7,500 persons than were apprehended in 1842. It is also satisfactory to be able to state, that the number of persons Summarily Convicted, and committed for trial, is less than either in the year 1847, or in the year 1842, although when relatively compared, with the number apprehended, in each of those years, the number appears to have increased, such facts are the evidence of the efficient working of the Police in preventing and diminishing crime, and at the same time show that they have been careful not to apprehend persons unnecessarily, as on charges of a frivolous and untenable character.

On reference to Table No 19 will be found a statement of the number of persons who have been annually apprehended according to the offences which they have committed since the establishment of the Police Force in the year 1839 and it will be seen that with the exception of parties charged with wilful damage there has been on the whole a considerable decrease in every class of offenders.

Amongst other facts the table shows that whilst the numbers of offences against the person in 1840 was 1,420, it is in 1848 only 753, that in the second class, viz:- offences against property committed with violence, the number in 1840 was 211 whilst in 1848, it is only 110, that in the third class the number in 1840 was 3,454 and in 1848 it is only 1697, and in number six class the number of offences was 7,064, whilst in the year 1848 it is only 3,430.

It will also be seen with reference to table No 22, that in the year 1842, the proportion of the discharged prisoners, to the total number of person apprehended, amounted to about 71 per cent, the Summarily Convicted, to only 21 per cent, and the committed for trial about seven and a half per cent, whilst in the year 1848, with less than half the number of prisoners, the discharged in proportion to the gross numbers of persons apprehended is only about 41 per cent, The Summarily Convicted equal to 46 per cent , and the committed for trial to 13 per cent. The same results also appear in regard to the prisoners convicted and sentenced; the proportion being in one case being rather less than 6 per cent on the number apprehended, and in the other rather more than ten and one quarter per cent, whilst a diminution has occurred in the actual number of persons committed either Summarily , or for trial, and I may be permitted here to remind the Committee that with such diminution of apprehensions a considerable saving of expense is secured to the Borough.

It will further be observed on referring to table No 23, that if the number of persons taken into custody, Summarily Convicted, and committed for trial, in each year is compared with the population, the percentage will have decreased in each year, since the year 1842. Although it may be assumed that the increased intelligence and the improved state of instruction amongst the operative classes has in some degree been instrumental in producing this desirable results there is no doubt as will be seen by these returns, and by the orderly state in which the Borough is maintained, that the greater proportion of the decrease must be ascribed to the efficiency and judgement exhibited by the Police in the performance their preventative as well as detective duties, peace and good order have been eminently sustained, street broils [brawls] which were frequent and of common occurrence some years since, rarely ever take place, and when they do arise, are immediately suppressed. Considering however the increase which is continually taking place both in the extent of the Town as well as the number of the population, I do not anticipate that we shall for some time to come much further decrease in the number of person apprehended. Amongst a community which, including the Salford and Broughton number upwards of 400,000 inhabitants, although much may be anticipated from an improvement of morals as well as increased intelligence we must yet anticipate a large amount of crime and that numerous offences will be committed. It is gratifying to refer to the evidence afforded of the increased intelligence and the improved feeling of the operative classes towards their employers during the recent period of excitement. When applied to the operatives with few exceptions willingly consented to be sworn in and associated for the protecting their Masters' property and when an attempt was made by a party of discontented people to turn out the mills no encouragement whatever was given by the hands who continued quietly about their work and expressed their determination to resist any attempts at forcible interference, and in one or two instances aided their employers and Police in driving away the idle and disorderly characters who endeavoured to disturb them.

That instruction has been on the increase to some extent will be apparent from the results which appear in Table 24, where the proportion as a percentage of the prisoners who possessed different degrees of instruction or who were totally uneducated is given. It appear that in the years 1840, 1841 and 1842 the proportions of the number of persons apprehended who were entirely uneducated was about from 51 to 55 per cent whilst in the year 1848 the proportion did not amount to 35 per cent, also that in the same years the proportions who had some degree of instruction or education averaged 37 per cent, whilst in the year 1848, it was from 60 – 74 per cent, thus showing a decrease in the proportion of totally uneducated persons and an increase in the proportion of those who possessed some degree of instruction. The prisoners who are stated to have had superior education are fewer in number than in any previous year whilst a greater proportion have been committed for trial , and in most instances for embezzlement. In the table in which the degree of instructions of the persons who have been sentenced to transportation is given, it appears that only five of the persons are said to be well educated, 58 very imperfectly educated , and 29 not educated at all, and that the greater portion of these prisoners had been several times previously in custody for for different offences and most of them had been previously punished.

In regard to the ages of the persons taken into custody during the year, 8 were under 10 years, 216 between the age of 10 and 15 years , `15 years 1151 between 15 and 20 years, and 1444 between 20 and 25 years, 142 between 25 and 30 years, and 153 between 30 and 40 years, the remainder in both instances decreases very considerably in proportion to the increase of age. The proportion of the persons who were in or out of work bear much the proportion to the number stated taken into custody.

As respects the robberies which have been reported to have been committed during the year it will be seen on reference to table No 47 that the total sum reported to have been stolen including the supposed value of every description of money, watches and plate, down to iron and lead, and articles of every trifling value to £11, 030, which is less by upwards of £1200 than the sum stated to have been stolen in the year 1847, and that of this sum £5772 has been has been recovered chiefly through the instrumentality of the Police. The Police have also recovered fro the Public the sum of £3083, reported to have been accidentally lost.

This Table also shows the means by which every robbery of which the Police had received information, was affected, as well as the time committed, and it will be seen that about double the number felonies have been committed between six o'clock in the morning, and nine o'clock in the evening, than between nine o'clock in the evening and six o'clock in the morning. The principal sum stolen and amounting to upwards of £1900 was obtained by a forged Bill but the greater proportion of the money was recovered; a large amount of money has been stolen by prostitutes and some considerable sums by pickpockets and lodgers and from parties whilst in a state of drunkenness. In other respects the felonies are of the usual description and amount, but the number of those committed in unoccupied premises and in dwelling houses whilst the occupiers have been absent from home, is greater than in any previous years, a circumstance not to be wondered at when it is considered that 3473 dwelling houses besides other premises have been untenanted.

The description of property stolen from untenanted consists of lead, iron and brass fittings which it is very hard to trace and recover. It is perhaps worthy of consideration whether much good might not be effected in the prevention as well as in the detection of such offences if the Council put in force the powers given and by the Police Act and compelled all persons dealing in the description of property, and who come under the denomination of Marine Store Dealers to take out a licence. Parties so licensed would be required to register in a book the name and address of the persons from whom they purchase such articles. Robberies from the person by prostitutes have been fewer and the amount stolen less than in the preceding year, the robberies being as 389 to 468 and the amount stolen as £1868 against £4432. The robberies by males from the person are also fewer than the year 1847, the number reported being as 343 to 368, and the amount stolen £763 to £1033.

There appears also to have been a diminution in the number of felonies committed in the houses which are merely spirit vaults is considerably greater than in the house which are without vaults, the proportion of felonies to the number of vaults being 33.33 per cent, whilst in the houses without vaults the proportion is not much more than 7 per cent, and in Public Houses which have vaults as well as other accommodation, the proportion of felonies committed in the vaults has amounted to 14.7 per cent whilst in other parts of the house it has only amounted to 6.06 per cent. The same occur in the two classes of Beerhouses; the proportion of robberies in those with vaults being 33.3 per cent, whilst in the houses without vaults it has not exceeded 4.5 per cent.

There has been an increase in the robberies committed in tenanted dwelling houses on the Sunday, both in the number reported as well as in the amount stolen. These robberies have have all occurred during the absence of the proprietors and in consequence of their having left no persons in charge of the premises. The persons who committed this class of robbery invariably get to know the habits of the family and watch them from home , when they enter by false keys or through the backs of premises which are generally enclosed by yards into which the Police have no access.

In regards to the returns relating to the occurrences of a general character which have taken place within the Borough during the year, I have much satisfaction in drawing attention to Table No 51, relating to fires. It will be seen that 14 mills and factories, 9 warehouses containing manufactured goods, 29 shops containing manufactured goods, 30 dwelling houses, 9 premises containing timber, besides other premises amounting in all to 100 buildings have been on fire, and that the total amount of damage or loss to buildings and property has not exceeded £38,765 and that the amount of salvages is estimated at £163,399, that 35 of the fires were extinguished by the Firemen with Engines, 5 by the Firemen without Engines, 9 by the Police, 27 by the Police and neighbours, and 24 by the owners and their workmen. The table also states the cause or origins of each fire and the amount of insurance in respect of the buildings and property and other particulars. I shall have satisfaction in being able to state that the duties in connection with this important department appear to be in all respects performed in a manner creditable to the Superintendent of the Fire Brigade.

From table No 59 it will be seen that the number of premises found insecure by the Police at night has amounted to 2676, of which 1396 containing property were entirely unoccupied as dwellings, and 537 also containing property were used as dwellings. The remainder amounting to 743 buildings were empty and unoccupied.

I can refer with satisfaction to table No 53 which relates to the conduct of the Public Houses, and which shows a reduction in the number of offences reported to have been committed, as well as in the amount of fines inflicted by the Justices. Indeed since the year 1845, the reports against Public Houses as well as the amount of penalties inflicted has been continually on the decrease; the number of reports having decreased from 227 to 58,and the amount of penalties from £174 4s 6d to £43 19s 0d, results which I believe may be attributed to not alone the vigilance of the Justices, and the determination shown to suppress the licences of those persons who kept disorderly houses, but also and in a large degree to the general good feeling and desire existing on the part of the Licensed Victuallers that their houses shall be respectfully conducted. The conduct of the Beer House Keepers has been I am sorry to say not so satisfactory, not only have the reports been more numerous, but the penalties more considerable than in the previous year although not more so than in the year 1845. To increase the the respectability of this class of houses it is in my opinion most desirable that the Legislature should give some control over the granting of Licenses to the Justices as is the case with the Public Houses. The class of offences which have been committed by the Landlords of Public Houses and Beer Houses will be found detailed in tables Nos 57 and 58 in which a distinction is made between the offences committed on Sundays and other days of the week. In respect to the Public Houses it appears that the Sunday offences are more numerous than on the ordinary days of the week, but I am glad to say that the great majority of the cases are for offences between 12 o'clock on the Saturday night and 6 o'clock on the Sunday morning, or in fact for not closing their houses at 12 o'clock at night as the Law directs, only 6 charges have been made for selling drink during Divine Service, and all the other charges according to their headings are few in number.

As respect to the Beer Houses the complaints made by the Police for selling drink both between 12 o'clock at night and 6 o'clock in the morning , and between 6 o'clock and the hours of Divine Service as well as during the hours of Divine Service are exceedingly numerous, as are also the charges for keeping drunken company in their houses at different periods on the Sunday. The offences on the ordinary days of the week although considerable in number are not so numerous as those on Sundays, but as compared with the Public Houses they appear to great disadvantage.

As regards the population no alteration is made in the number as given in the returns for the year 1847. In collecting the information it was ascertained that although there had been an increase of 880 additional dwelling houses there were 936 more uninhabited houses within the Borough at the time the return was obtained than there were at the same period in the previous years. The same results were also found to exist in regard to the dwelling cellars, for although there had been an increase in the gross number of dwelling cellars, there were 680 more cellars uninhabited when the return was taken than was in the case in 1847. In addition to the returns just referred to, a table No 63 has been compiled in which is shown the number and description of every building and the population residing within each street, court, alley or lane within the limits of each Township of the Borough, together with other information of a valuable and useful character.

With respect to the expenditure which for the year ending the 31st August 1848 appears to have slightly exceeded the estimate, a few words will I trust satisfy the Committee that the same degree of economy has been practised as in previous years when the expenditure has been invariably below the estimates. The extraordinary state of the times will readily account for the increase which has occurred and which amounts to £800. It is true that the wages of the extra Supernumeraries employed during the period of excitement have been place in a separate account but nevertheless numerous expenses arising out of the state of the times as well as the increase of the Police Force were necessarily incurred by which the contingencies at the Stations including the expense of gas, coals, accoutrements, cab hire, and other items of general expenditure have been considerably increased , notwithstanding however the excess of £800 above the estimate [of] the total cost of the regular Police Force including every item of expense has not amounted to more than £57 1s 1d per head which is a very low average rate of expenditure, even if the necessity for so many additional but unavoidable expenses had not arisen.

The increase in buildings and the extension of dwelling houses in the outskirts which have been on for years has caused some of the beats to become so large as to compel if due protection is to be afforded, either an addition to the Force or a revision of the beats throughout the Borough, and such revision has been commenced , and is now going on, and knowing the pressure upon the Rates at present existing I have been unwilling to suggest any addition and am in hope that such a rearrangement may be made as will secure with the present Force due protection to all Parts of the Borough and to all who are called upon to pay the rates. That advantage to the inhabitants is secured by the number and efficiency of the Force is shown from the fact which has frequently been observed by the Superintendents that whenever the beats of the Constables in consequence of sickness or from other causes are not fully supplied both robberies and and vagrancy increase, and order within such districts is not so efficiently maintained; with any increase of offences an increase of prisoners would take place and with such an increase of prisoners increased expense, and with the increase of crime and offences, as well as expense, it is certain that dissatisfaction from the want of sufficient protection would be soon felt and expressed.

The information contained in table No 44 is important and to that I would respectfully direct the attention of the Committee. It will be seen that in streets when rentals of the houses average from £10 to £15 and from £15 to £25 respectively the robberies during the past year have not only be most numerous, but the amount of property stolen most considerable, and that this class of property has suffered more than any other from robberies committed during the absence of the owners. The class of house property which has next suffered both in the number of robberies and in the amount stolen includes houses with rentals averaging between £25 and £35 per annum; houses of which the rental is above £40 are included under one head and although the amount stolen in the gross of this class of dwellings is rather more in amount than in either of the preceding classes., if taken separately, it is not nearly so large if taken together, nor have the robberies been so numerous as in the class of houses of small rentals even when taken separately, it thus appears that the streets in which the house s of the lowest rentals are situated, require even more efficient and constant protection than any other part of the Borough.

That the strictest economy has been been observed will I venture to think be shown by the following tabular statement.



Average relative strengths

Rates of Pay allowed to constables

Yearly expenditure

Average cost per head

Police Force from


7/- per week



October 1839 to

328

14/- per week

£23622 3s 0d

£70 0s 4 1/2d

01/10/42


17/- per week








Police Force from


17/- per week



September 1847 to

469

18/- per week

£26758 7s 0d

£57 1s 1d

01/09/48











The increase in the expense has amounted to only £3136 4s 0d although the additional 141 men if calculated at the cost of £72 per head which was the average cost per head in the years referred to would amount to the sum of £10152, and if calculated at £57 1s 0d the average cost per head during the past year to the sum of £8040.

It may then be further stated that the Police have been the means of producing revenue to two departments connected with the Corporation viz the Court and the Nuisance Department. The sum received at the Court from information given by the Police has been considerable, and the amount of penalties inflicted by the Nuisance Committee for offences reported by the Police has amounted to the sum of £254 10s 0d.

In conclusion I have merely to state that the conduct of the Police during the year has been exceedingly good and that during the period of excitement which lasted so far as the Police had to do with the matter for many months the conduct of the Officers and Constables was most exemplary, and deserving of high commendation.

Although constantly retained on extra special duty for many hours both by day and by night, all services required were performed with the greatest cheerfulness and good will. If other and more disinterested testimony were required , I might refer to the Grand Juries both at the Sessions and the Assizes who have frequently expressed their high satisfaction with the manner in which the evidence of members of this Police Force has been invariably given. I have also to express the deep obligation I feel under to the Superintendents for the zealous and efficient manner in which they have performed the onerous duties which were imposed upon them, and for the valuable and accurate information which they obtained of all that was taking place within the Borough and in the adjoining districts during a period of much anxiety, whereby I was enabled to keep the Justices fully informed on all matters connected with and likely to affect the peace of this Borough.


I have the honor to be Your obedient Servant,


Edward Willis,

Chief Constable


Meeting 26th April 1849


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: Charles Mould, Samuel Yarwood and Edward Oakley.


Resolved

That Sub Inspector Joseph Wood, Clerk to the Chief Constable is hereby appointed to the rank of Inspector at 30/- per week.


Resolved

That the following Police Constables having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Sub Inspectors at the wages of 25/- per week: Francis Ogden and John Cookson.


A DIVISION STATION AND LOCKUPS

Memorandum

The undersigned appointed as a Sub Committee for the purpose of examining the state of the Lockups in the Town Hall, and to suggest a plan for the improvement of the same, recommend that in order to afford better ventilation to three of the cells at present in use, an alteration be immediately made in the small yard, adjoining the Cheapside end of the Town Hall, by removing a portion of a blank wall which is erected in front of the windows of the cells, and which intercepts the light and the air from the lockups; the expense of such alteration it is estimated will not exceed £5. The undersigned do not think that with this alteration the lockups would be in as satisfactory a state as they ought to be, but as the alterations would effect an improvement in the ventilation at a trifling expense, the Watch Committee are recommended to carry out the suggestion.

William Neild

P F Willart

William Bowker

Matthew Thackray


Resolved

That the recommendation of the Sub Committee be and is hereby approved of and adopted, and that the Chief Constable be authorised to get the proposed alteration made forthwith.


Meeting 3rd May 1849


Resolved

That the following Nuisance Inspectors appeared before the Committee were severally sworn in to act as Constables; Inspectors Hill; Walton; Shorrocks and Lee.


Meeting 17th May 1849


Memorandum

Following read from extracts from the minutes of the proceedings of the Building and Sanitary Regulations Committee of 16th inst.

Mr Ashmore having reported that several cases of Fever arisen from the cellar No 8 Style street from the overcrowding of same with lodgers.


Resolved

That the attention of the Watch Committee be called to the circumstances, and be also requested to take the necessary steps for preventing the overcrowding of lodging houses.


Memorandum

Extracts read from the Chief Constable's report.

The Chief Constable inform the Committee that he lately received from the Board of Guardians a report calling his attention to the conditions of several cellars and lodging houses which had been reported by the Surgeon to the union, to be in a crowded and dirty state and infected with fever. The Chief Constable on enquiring ascertained that some of the cellars and lodgings referred to by the Board of Guardians, as many as twenty, thirty and even forty persons were found collected together, having nothing but straw or shavings for bedding, that in each dwelling some of the lodgers were ill with fever or some other kind of sickness, and that the places were generally extremely dirty and ill ventilated. The Officers of the Police have since removed all the cases of fever, whitewashed and cleansed the lodgings and compelled (as in visits of former occasions) the occupiers of the dwellings to remove some of their lodgers, and retain only as many as it was supposed each dwelling could accommodate with due regard to health and proper ventilation. The Officers in making their visits invariably found that the regulations which had been posted on previous visits had been removed and that the occupiers were fresh tenants stated their ignorance of any regulations having been posted up in their dwellings. The Committee will remember that the sanitary duties performed by the Police, have only been undertaken on occasions when the Medical Gentlemen of the Union have reported the necessity of the interference of the Authorities either in consequence of sickness prevailing or when they found the lodgings in a dirty and unhealthy state, consequently from the want of continual supervision the lodging houses have always relapsed after being cleansed and whitewashed by the Police into the same filthy state in which they have been kept. The Chief Constable in order to remedy the evils which arise from the want of constant supervision over the lodging houses and cellars, would suggest that an Officer of the Police who should remain under the control and charge of the Chief Constable be appointed specially as a Sanitary Officer for the purpose of inspecting and enforcing proper regulations and cleanliness in the lodging houses and lodging cellars throughout the Borough which are now very numerous, and that such Officer hold the rank and receive the pay of an Inspector of Police, and that the cost of such Officer, and the expense which may be incurred in cleansing and whitewashing be placed in a separate account and submitted for the sanction and approval of the Watch Committee at the expiration of each month. The Chief Constable is of the opinion that the improvement which would ensue in the morals, habits and cleanliness of the people who inhabit these dwellings from the proposed plan of having an Officer to be continually inspecting and making the occupiers conform to good regulations would be very considerable and that the expense per annum would not be greater than it is at present as the Chief Constable finds that the expense of cleansing and whitewashing in 1847 when the fever was prevalent amounted to £110 5s 1d independent of the regular wages of the Police Officers, who were for several months entirely engaged attending to this duty, and in 1848 to £21 19s 0d exclusive of the wages of the Officers of Police during the time they were engaged in the sanitary duties.


Resolved

That the recommendations contained in the report of the Chief Constable now read be and hereby approved and adopted.


Memorandum

Inspector Fallows of the Nuisances Department appeared before the Committee , and in accordance with the the request of the Nuisance Committee was sworn to act as a Police Constable.


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed as Police Constables:

John Flynn; Joseph Jackson; James Pearson: James Ollier; Joseph Topp; George Henderson and James Carswell.


Resolved

That in accordance with the recommendation of the Chief Constable the following Police Constables are hereby promoted to the merit class:

A47 Daniel Cornwall

A 56 Thomas Passman

A 71 William Bradford


Police Relief Fund

Resolved

That upon consideration of the report this day made by the Chief Constable of the past services and present state of health of Police Constable Thomas Partington a superannuation allowance of 9/- per week be made to him out of the Police Relief Fund on his retirement from the Police Service.


Meeting 24th May 1849


Resolved

That in accordance with the recommendation of the Chief Constable, Sub Inspector Stock be, and is hereby appointed Inspector at wages of 30/- per week and [that] Constable Thomas Bramall [is appointed] Sub Inspector at the wages of 25/- per week.


Meeting June 7th 1849


Police Relief Fund

Memorandum

Memorial read from the Superintendents, Officers and Constables of the force suggesting certain alterations in the mode of distributing the funds.


Resolved

That the memorial be referred to the Chairman, Deputy Chairman, the Mayor, Sir E Armitage, Mr Alderman Mayson, Mr Medcalf and Mr Thackray, and that they be requested to consider and report upon the suggestions contained therein.


Meeting June 14th 1849


Police Forces – Comparative Strengths

The following report by the Chief Constable was read out:

The Chief Constable begs to offer for the information of the Committee the following observations on the systems adopted by in Birmingham and Bristol in regard to the construction and management of the Police Forces. In both towns the Police arrangements appear to be similar in nearly all respects and the constables who are unmarried are located in barracks, there are five classes of constables whose wages vary from 12/- to 19/- per week according to length of servitude.

In Birmingham where the population is computed to be 200,000 persons the Police Force number 315 individuals, being in the proportion of one constable to 634 of the inhabitants, the Watch Committee had however directed an increase of the Force by 10 additional men the day prior to the Chief Constable's visit. So that the Police may said to be in the proportion of one Constable to 615 inhabitants. The annual expenditure of the Police was £18,090 and the average cost per head £57 8s 7d. The number of night beats is 222, and the day beats 60, but with the additional men who have lately been granted, and who are on for day duty, the day beats will not amount to 70 in number.

In Bristol where the population is computed at 135, 000 the Police Force numbers 248 persons, which gives an average of one Constable to 544 of the inhabitants. The annual expenditure amounted to £14,000, and the average cost per head £56 9s 0d, the night beats are 166 in number and the day beats 82.

The system which is adopted in the above named Forces of paying a portion of the Constables very low wages, the Chief Constable thinks this is extremely objectionable as men who are so paid would in most instances enter the service as a temporary convenience, and the changes that must be continually taking place under such a plan cannot to deteriorate the Force both in respectability and in efficiency.

In Manchester the population is computed to be at 299,445, and the number of Police amounts to 447 persons, which gives an average of one Constable to 670 of the inhabitants, the annual expenditure has amounted to £25,503, and the average cost per head £57 1s 7d, the number of night beats are 238 and the day beats 112.

In comparing Manchester with Bristol and Birmingham it will be seen that the Police are fewer in number in proportion to the population than in either of those towns, but if the population of the adjoining districts, which is more numerous around Manchester, than any other provincial town in England; were taken into consideration, the Police Force would appear to be much under the average of those Towns in proportion to the population of its own immediate residents and the large numbers which daily flock into the Town from adjoining districts.

In regard to the expenditure, the cost per head of the Manchester police according to the returns of the past year, appears to be less than in Birmingham, but rather larger than Bristol, the total cost per head however of the three Police Forces may be said to be to be maintained at a low rate although during the past year in Manchester and very probably in the other towns the expenses were increased by the anxious state of the times and the precautionary measures that had to be adopted.

As respects to the conduct of the Constables the Chief Constable had an opportunity of instituting a comparison with Bristol and Birmingham no returns are published respecting the behaviour of the Police; in Manchester however the returns are very favourable in this respect, and it may be satisfactory to state that the year the dismissals only amount to 22 being at the rate of about 5 per cent.

In one respect both the Bristol and Birmingham have a very decided advantage over Manchester, viz, in the construction of the cells but particularly as regards those situated at the principal stations, and the Chief Constable thinks it well worthy of the consideration of the Committee (before any money is expended in altering the cells under the Town Hall) whether it would be desirable that the Surveyor should visit Birmingham or Bristol in order to examine the plan upon which the lockups are constructed.

Edward Willis

June 14th 1849


Lodging Houses

Memorandum


The Chief Constable informs the Committee that the Sanitary Inspector who commenced the duties of his office on 30th May last had on Sunday night 9th inst. completed the inspection of 82 of the worst descriptions of lodging houses and 71 dwelling of the poor.

In each of the above mentioned lodging the rooms were re-measured and the number of lodgers assigned to each that hereafter be permitted to be accommodated, regulations have also been posted on each of the rooms, which have been re-numbered, and a fresh register is being prepared as the Officer proceeds on his investigation.

Sixty of the proprietors of the lodging houses which have been visited, and thirty of the occupiers of dwelling houses have already whitewashed and cleansed their houses, and the other have received notice to do the same have signified their intention of complying with the order without delay. Forty beds in overcrowded houses have been removed, and the Chief Constable expects that the improvements which are being affected in the sanitary state of the lodgings and dwellings of the poor, and which were much required, for every house that has been visited has been reported in a dirty and unwholesome state, will be effected without causing much expense to the Borough.

William Neild

Chairman.


Meeting 21st June 1849


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

Benjamin Brown ,Henry Wilson, Charles Sandford , Thomas Gough, William Cowap, John Burtless and George Allen.


Meeting 28th June 1849


Memorandum

Following extract read from the Minutes of the Nuisance Committee's proceedings on 27th June inst.


Resolved that subject to the Watch Committee cancelling the appointment of Mr Fox as Inspector in the Police Force,  be, and is hereby re-appointed Superintendent of the Nuisance Departments.

Resolved that it appears to this Committee that the Police Officers of A Division are not as vigilant in the reporting of Dogs at Large as those of the other Divisions, and that the Chief Constable be requested to urge the Officers of A Division to pay strict attention to such cases.


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be requested to call the attention of the Superintendent of the A Division to the resolutions now read.


Meeting 5th July 1849


Resolved

That the resignation of the situation of Inspector Joseph Fox is hereby accepted and that he be allowed to accept the situation of Superintendent of the Nuisance &c Department offered to him.


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

Edward Walton, Joseph Hacker and Henry Buxton.


Police Library

Memorandum

Read note from Mr George H Norton, Superintendent of Markets presenting 27 volumes of books to the Police Library.


Resolved

That the thanks of this Committee be tendered to Mr Norton for the very handsome donation of 27 volumes of books, made by him to the Police Library.


Meeting 12th July 1849


Memorandum

The following extract was read from the Minutes of the proceedings of th e Lamp and Scavenging Committee on 10th July inst.

That the Watch Committee be respectfully requested to instruct their Officers to prepare and furnish to this Department, a list of ashpits within the Borough, distinguishing those used by the occupiers of several dwellings, and those attached to separate houses, shops, offices or warehouses.


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be instructed to prepare and furnish the information applied for by the Lamp and Scavenging Committee as stated in the Resolution now read.


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the committee are hereby appointed Constables: John Hampson and Thomas Lambert.


Meeting 19th July 1849


Resolved

That the Chairman be respectfully requested to give to Mr Walker Golland in compliance with his application, a testimonial on behalf of this Committee stating the highly satisfactory manner in which Mr Golland has discharged his duties as the Surgeon to the Police Force during a period of seven years.


Memorandum

A copy of the depositions taken at the Inquest of holden upon the body of Lewis Jackson who died from injuries accidentally received from a fall at the Borough Gaol [Hyde Road Prison was not completed yet, and Strangeways did not exist, so it must be the New Bailey Gaol referred to], forwarded by directions of the Jury was read; by which several of the Police Officers were charged with neglect, in not taking immediate steps for the conveyance of the injured party to the Infirmary.

Read also reports submitted by the Chief Constable detailing the circumstances under which the Police were applied to by one of the witnesses for assistance.


Resolved

That after full consideration of the statements contained in the depositions and the reports submitted by the Chief Constable, this Committee are of the opinion that no blame whatever is attachable to the Officers of the Force.


Meeting 26th July 1849


Memorandum

The Chief Constable having reported that the bedding for the Constables at the Oldham Road Station was completely worn out, the same having been in use since 1839.


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be authorised to procure the requisite quantity of bedding for the Oldham Road Station, to replace the old worn out bedding.


Resolved

That F W Granham having appeared before the Committee be, in accordance with the recommendation of the Chief Constable, appointed Inspector at the wage of 30/- per week.


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: Henry Allen and James Cawthorn.


Memorandum

George Smart and John Jones employed as Clerks in the Central Police Office appeared before the Committee and were sworn to act as Constables.


Sanitary Inspectors Proceedings

The Chief Constable begs to submit for the information of the Watch Committee a summary of the whole of the duties performed by the Sanitary Officer from 30th May when he first commenced his duties to 21st July inst.


Total number of dwellings found dirty and notice to cleanse served

Number cleansed since receiving notice

Number not yet cleansed

Beds taken down

Lodging Houses found overcrowded

Cases of fever &c reported

Cases of Cholera reported

Cases of destitution reported to the Guardians

Cases of vagrancy thro' neglect of family reported to the Guardians

Number of funerals hastened in case of cholera

961

943

18

89

20

15

8

5

2

3



Number of Nuisances reported


Total No of cases reported to Nuisance Department

Ashpits &c requiring emptying

Stagnant pools

Grids and sewers stopped

Keeping pigs

Dirty slaughter house

Dirty Street

Houses without privies

54

16

6

8

9

1

1

13


Meeting August 2nd 1849


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: John Garner, Robert Jordan, Joseph Wright and John Mundy.


Memorandum

The Chief Constable submitted the Returns of Privies and Ashpits within the Borough prepared in compliance with the request of the Lamp and Scavenging Committee, and of which the following is a summary.


Townships

Privies &c used by the occupiers of several dwellings

Privies &c attached to houses, shops, offices or warehouses

Total number of privies of both classes

Nunmber of Streets in each township without privies &c

Ardwick

217

1989

2206

16

Beswick

13

23

36

-

Chorlton upon Medlock

421

4708

5129

19

Cheetham

28

2397

2425

17

Hulme

410

8498

8908

3

Manchester

2661

12196

14857

280

Totals

3750

29811

33561

335



Note several of these streets without privies are composed of warehouses, offices &c and are supplied in many instances with with water closets in the interior of the buildings.


Meeting August 9th 1849

Memorandum

Read following from the Minutes of the Lamp & Scavenging Committee's proceedings on 7th August inst;

That the thanks of this Committee be given to the Watch Committee for their ready compliance with the request of the Committee in preparing and furnishing the very valuable returns of the ashpits within the Borough now laid before the Committee.

That under the direction of the Chairman, a handbill be prepared and delivered to the inhabitants, cautioning them that proceedings will be taken against all parties who are found throwing ashes, filth or vegetable refuse in the streets, and that the Nuisance and Watch Committees be requested to instruct their Officers to prevent such descriptions of nuisances being committed.


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be and is hereby directed to instruct the Police Officers to take cognizances of and report to the Nuisance Department all nuisances of the description referred to in the extract now read.


Memorandum

Read extracts from the Minutes of the proceedings of the Nuisance Committee 8th August instant.

That the watch Committee be respectfully requested to give the necessary instructions to their Officers to prevent the obstructions caused by the assembling of crowds of people in Market Street and at the ends of Barnes Street and Fountain Street, as well as near the exchanges.


Resolved

That parties be cautioned by public notices signed by the Mayor, against congregation in the place referred to the Resolution.

Resolved

That the extract now read be referred to the Chief Constable with instructions to take such steps as he may think advisable for preventing the obstructions complained of.


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be authorised to transfer the Fine Fund Account from the Savings Bank to the Bank of Sir Benjamin Heywood Bank Company.


Meeting 23rd August 1849


Sanitary Regulations

Memorandum

Read the following report

The Chief Constable informs the Committee that since the last report on sanitary matters was submitted, the Sanitary Officer has visited 625 additional dwellings of the poor and 56 lodging houses or in gross 681 dwellings of which 658 have been cleansed and whitewashed by the occupiers or owners. The lodging house keepers have also been made to comply with the regulations adopted for preventing disease by reducing the number of their lodgers to the number which house is supposed to be able to accommodate and it may now be considered that the dwellings of the poorer inhabitants of the Town so far as the inspection has been carried, are in a satisfactory as to health and cleanliness.


Meeting September 16th 1849


Obstructions in Market Street

Memorandum read from the minutes of the Nuisance Committee proceedings on 5th instant.

Mr Councillor Bake having complained that the notices placarded in Barnes Street forbidding parties to congregate there, had not been similarly placarded at the Exchange and in Fountain Street. Resolved that the attention of the Watch Committee be called thereto.


Resolved

That the extract now read be referred to the Chief Constable.


Meeting September 13th 1849


Memorandum

Read memorial from numerous parties resident in Oldham Street, and requesting the Committee to take steps for preventing the Exhibition being continued.


Resolved

The the memorialists be informed that instructions have been given to the Police to prevent the obstructions, and as far as practicable the annoyances from the Exhibition in Oldham Street, but that this Committee possesses no power to prevent Exhibitions of the description referred to in their memorial, which are within doors.


Obstructions in Market Street

Memorandum

The Chief Constable reported that the same publicity had been given to the notices issued respecting the obstructions in the streets in the neighbourhood of the Exchange and Fountain Street, as was given in Barnes Street.


Resolved

That a copy of this resolution be transmitted to the Nuisance Committee.


Memorandum

The Mayor communicated the following extract from the proceedings of the Board of Guardians for the Manchester Union:-

That the Chairman and Mr Ashmore, on behalf of the Sanitary Committee of the Board of Guardians, wait upon His Worship, the Mayor of Manchester to request of the Watch Committee of the Town Council [it was still the Borough Council at this stage] to instructions to the Police to to give information to all necessitous persons who may make application to them in reference to premonitory diarrhoea or actual cholera, or to necessitous persons coming under their observation who may be labouring under such symptoms, of the names and residencies of [should be to] the District Medical officers of the Township of Manchester, and of the situation general depot where medicines and advice may be procured for such complaints.


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be authorised and instructed to get the information contained in the statement referred to in the resolutions of the Board of Guardians now read printed and to place copies of the same in the hands of the Police for distribution in all cases when the information may be required.


Meeting September 20th 1849


Sanitary Regulations

Memorandum

Read following report

The Chief Constable submits for the information of the Committee a tabular statement of the duties which have been performed by the Sanitary Inspectors during the last month, together with a general summary of the total numbers of houses which have been visited and attended to since the appointment of the Officer in May last.


Total Dwellings Inspected

Found dirty and noticed to cleanse

Whitewashed after notice

Cases of sickness reported

Low lodging houses

re-visited

Nuisances reported

262

262

257

38

287

46


General summary of duties performed from 30th May [last year?] to 15th instant.


Low lodging houses and dwellings of the poor inspected

Whitewashed after notice

Not yet cleansed

Rooms measured &

regulations

Beds taken down

Cases of sickness reported

Nuisances reported

1910

1901

9

769

105

74

148

The Chief Constable thinks it right to state that in addition to the above recorded duties the Sanitary Officer has been much engaged in conveying information tp the Offices of the Guardians, of cases of illness, and in obtaining medical assistance.


Meeting September 27th 1849


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

Joseph Turner, Thomas Gee, Charles Stephenson, Michael Cavanah and Joseph Banks.


Meeting October 4th 1849


Resolved

That during the prevalence of Cholera and the consequent additional expense to which Sanitary Inspector Gifford has therefore been put an allowance of 5/- per week in addition to his usual wages be made to him; such allowance to commence from 1st August last.


Resolved

That a gratuity of £2 be paid to Police Constable James Leech on account of the extra duty performed by him in the Sanitary Department.


Merit Class

Resolved

That in accordance with the recommendations of the Chief Constable the following Police Constables be promote to the Merit Class:

D40 Charles Goaby

48 Charles Wood

77 Henry Bateman

79 William Woodall

Clothing

Resolved

That under the directions of the Clothing Sub-committee the force be furnished with a second pair of trousers for the year, and also capes.


Fairfield Street Lockups

Memorandum

Mr Alderman Neild on behalf of Messrs Thomas Hoyle & Sons, applied for permission, upon terms to be agreed upon, to temporarily enclose a portion of land behind the Lockup in Fairfield Street.


Resolved

That the Deputy Chairman, Mr Councillor Thackray be requested to report upon the application made by Mr Alderman Neild.


Meeting October 11th 1849


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

William Henry Cockshott

Richard Mould

Samuel Dickenson

Samuel Bradshaw

Peter Wilkinson

Irving Watson

John Wintersgill


Expenses of Constables

Memorandum

The Chief Constable informs the Committee that an application has been made by the head of the Police Department in Liverpool, that the expenses of the Liverpool who may happen to apprehend prisoners for offence committed in Manchester should (when such expenses are duly certified and directed to be allowed by the Committing Magistrate) be paid to the Officers at once, as is done in Liverpool, instead of being kept back as is at present the case in Manchester until after the trial has taken place at the Sessions or Assizes,


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be directed to make the arrangement suggested in his report.


Meeting October 18th 1849


Sanitary Department

Read following report of the Chief Constable

The Chief Constable begs to submit for the information of the Committee the undermentioned return of the duties performed by the Sanitary Officer from 17th October instant:


Low Lodging Houses Inspected

Dwellings of the Poor Inspected

Inspected and Found Clean

Case of Cholera Reported

Numbers Inspected

Found Clean

Found Dirty

Since Cleaned

Case of Cholera reported

Cases of Fever Reported

122

1

464

386

78

56

33

2


Number of Nuisances Reported by the Sanitary Officer

Extra – Dwellings of the Poor reported by the Medical Officer of the Manchester Union and since inspected by the Sanitary Officer



Total Number

Found Dirty or Where Sickness Existed

Found Damp and Unfit for Lime Washing

Lime Washed by Occupiers

Lime Washed at the Public Cost

Shut Up

39

217

118

99

38

30

7


Meeting 31st October 1849


Resolved

That the following Police Constables having discharged their duties in an efficient manner be, in accordance with the recommendation of the Chief Constable, promoted to the Merit Class:

B8 James Murray

B75 Walter Taylor

B59 Thomas Smith

B44 Edward Wall

B82 Edward Kennedy

B23 Thomas Boulton


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

Henry Stubbs

John Purcell

Thomas Lee

George Bowker

Thomas Hackney

John Crowshaw

Reuben Thompson


Meeting November 22nd 1849


Sanitary Regulations

Memorandum

The Chief Constable submits for the information of the Committee a tabular statement of the duties performed by the Sanitary Inspector during the last month, together with a general sumary of the total number of houses which have been visited and attended to, since the appointment of the Officer in May last.

Sanitary duties performed from 17th October to 10th instant.


Total Dwellings Inspected

Found Dirty and Noticed to Clean

Whitewashed After Notice

Cases of Sickness Reported

Low Lodging Houses Re-visited

Nuisances reported

496

32

20

19

187

96


General summary of duties performed from 30th May to 10th instant.


Low Lodging Houses and Dwellings of the Poor Inspected

Total Number of Low Lodging Houses and Dwellings of the Poor Inspected

Whitewashed After Notice

Not Yet Cleansed

Number of Rooms Measured

Beds Taken Down

Cases of Sickness Reported

Nuisances Reported

2496

957

31

769

105

109

187


Extra - Dwellings of the Poor reported by the Medical Officer of the Manchester Union and since inspected by the Sanitary Officer

Total Number

Found Dirty or Where Sickness Existed

Found Damp and Unfit for Lime Washing

Lime Washed by Occupiers

Lime washed at Public Cost

Shut Up

283

184

99

68

66

7



Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

William Thompsom

George Redfern

Samuel Garner

Robert Bingham

Charles East

Owen Hughes

John Bainbridge

Edward Tomlinson

Joseph Speak

Robert Greenwood


Meeting 29th November 1849


Memorandum

The Chief Constable reported that he considered that the causes which induced the Committee to grant an extra allowance of 5/- per week to Inspector Gifford as compensation for the extra expense which he was put to during the prevalence of Cholera had disappeared and rather less than the ordinary amount of fever and sickness now prevailed.


Resolved

That the extra allowance of 5/- a week as compensation for the extra expense which he was put to during the prevalence of Cholera be discontinued at the close of this month.


Memorandum

The Chief Constable reported the result of his enquiries as to the circumstances referred to in the letter read at the recent meeting of the Board of Guardians by Mr Richardson, assistant Clerk and published in the papers of 17th November instant; and the Chief Constable expressed his opinion that Inspector Gifford was able to disprove the charges made by Mr Richardson and also to show in particular cases referred to as well as others, he had acted with discretion and propriety.


Meeting 20th December 1849


Resolved

That Police Constable B 60 Richard Lalor, having appeared before the Committee be, in accordance with the recommendation of the Chief Constable, appointed Sub-Inspector, at the wages of 25/- a week.


Meeting 27th December 1849


Resolved

That in accordance with the recommendation of the Chief Constable, the following Police Constables be promoted to the Merit Class:

A24 Charles N Thwaite

A69 Alfred Whittaker

A 6 John Lee


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

Thomas Lowe

William Bebbington

James Lambert

Thomas Buckley

Joseph Walton

Joseph Read

James Bailie

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