BOROUGH POLICE FORCE THIRD PART JAN 1844 - DEC 1846

 

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MANCHESTER FAMILY HISTORY RESEARCH

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CONTENTS

HOMEPAGE

A  MANCHESTER RESEARCHER'S TALE

MANCHESTER AND STOCKPORT CERTIFIED INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS

MANCHESTER COURT RECORDS

BELLE VUE PRISON RECORDS

NEW BAILEY PRISON RECORDS

STRANGEWAYS PRISON RECORDS

STRANGEWAYS PRISON: FIRST REPORTS

MANCHESTER MARTYRS' PRISON RECORDS

PRESS REACTION TO THE MANCHESTER EXECUTIONS PART I

PART II

PART III

WHAT  DID HAPPEN TO THE REMAINS OF THE PRISONERS EXECUTED AT MANCHESTER?

THE MANCHESTER FELONY REGISTER PT 1

PART 2

PART 3

PART 4 

GREATER MANCHESTER RIOTS IN 1868

MANCHESTER AND LANCASHIRE STRAYS IN MILL BANK PRISON

MANCHESTER POOR LAW AND WORKHOUSE RECORDS

MANCHESTER POOR LAW UNION MINUTES

CHORLTON AND SOUTH MANCHESTER REGISTRATION DISTRICT

VOTING REGISTERS AND ELIGIBILITY IN MANCHESTER

1831 POPULATION FIGURES FOR MANCHESTER

MANCHESTER CENSUS COLLECTION DETAILS

PLACES OF WORSHIP IN MANCHESTER AND SALFORD

MANCHESTER PARISH AND CITY

MANCHESTER CITY CENTRE CHURCHES

MANCHESTER AND GENERAL INFORMATION

MANCHESTER BOROUGH POLICE FORCE

SECOND PART

THIRD PART

FOURTH PART

MANCHESTER INQUESTS WITNESS STATEMENTS INDEX

TRANSPORT IN MANCHESTER PART ONE

PART TWO

USEFUL LINKS

MANCHESTER FAMILY HISTORY CONTACT PAGE

   

 

MANCHESTER BOROUGH POLICE FORCE THIRD PART JAN 1844 - DEC 1846

Find My Past

 

This is a continuation of the story of the Manchester Borough Police Force based on the minutes of the City Borough Council Watch Committee meetings. See here and here for parts one and two.

 

Meeting  of the Manchester Borough Watch Committee 11th January 1844

Resolved

The following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: John Lewis, Robert Hopkins and Joseph Slack.


Meeting 18th January 1844

Resolved

The following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

James Brooks, James Marshall, Richard Richards and William Hardy.


Meeting 1st February 1844


Resolved

The following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

Richard Middleton and William Bentley.


Meeting 8th February 1844


Resolved

That William Brierley having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Police Constable of the Borough.


Meeting 15th February 1844


Resolved

That deputed members be requested to meet the sub committee of the Lamp, Scavenging and Hackney Coach Committee* on the subject of the resolution adopted by the Council on 7th February in relation to the duties of Mr Rose in connection with the Lamp and Scavenging Departments of the Township of Manchester and the providing of an efficient inspection of such departments, and to report thereon to this Committee.


Resolved

That George Pierson and William Kirk having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Police Constable of the Borough.

*This committee often referred to as Lamp &c Committee


Meeting 22nd February 1844


Resolved

That Thomas Jackson and James Watt having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Police Constable of the Borough.


Meeting 29th February 1844


Resolved

That Thomas Walters having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Police Constable of the Borough.


Memorandum

The following report was read. The undersigned were deputed to consider and report upon the report of the Manchester Nuisance Committee laid before the Watch Committee on 11th January last and also how far the assistance of the Police can be satisfactorily rendered in the suppression of nuisances within the Township of Manchester beg to report:


That in their opinion that the following plan should be adopted with a view to render the interference of the Police Force in the suppression of nuisances most efficient and also to prevent the unnecessary withdrawal of the Officers of the Force from their ordinary duties.

That the Police be requested whilst on regular duty or otherwise to take notice of and report all offences against the Local Acts which are detailed in the books lately supplied to the Force by the Nuisance Committee.

That the Constable witnessing any such offence be requested to take the name and address of the party offending, and to report the case to his Officer on being visited and at the station when relieved from duty.

That the Constable be directed to take in charge any person offending who shall refuse to give his name and address.

That the Officer on duty at the Station shall be authorised to liberate the offender on being satisfied that he has obtained the correct name and address of the party charged or on such party giving satisfactory bail. If bail however be taken in it must be it must necessarily be to appear before the Magistrate in which case the charge must be entered in the regular charge sheet and disposed of in court.

That no deposits in money as a security for the appearance of any part charged before the Nuisance Committee or otherwise shall under any circumstances or upon any pretence whatsoever be taken by any member of the Police Force.

That the Superintendents of the several Divisions of the Police (who shall be supplied with blank summonses or notices) be required to serve or cause to be served all notices on parties reported by the Police for offences against the provisions of the Police Act who shall reside within the limits of their respective Divisions.

That the notices or summonses on all parties residing beyond the limits of the Borough shall be served by the officers of the Nuisance Committee.

That the Superintendents of each Division shall send down each morning to the Town Hall a copy of all nuisances cases reported within their respective Divisions in which the parties charged reside beyond the limits of the Borough.

That due notice in writing be sent to the respective Superintendents when the case to be brought before the Nuisance Committee in order that the Police Constables who have reported the cases maybe in attendance.

That all offences reported by the Police shall be brought before the Nuisance Committee by and under the direction of the Chief Constable or the Officer or Officers appointed by him to act in that behalf.

That books be supplied to each Division in which to enter all nuisance cases together with the decision of the Committee or of the Magistrate thereon.

That loose sheets of a similar form to the books last referred to be also supplied to the Divisions and that a sheet containing an exact copy of the cases intended to be brought before the Nuisance Committee be sent sent to the office of the Inspector of Nuisances at the Town Hall on the day proceeding that on which the Committee meets in order that the book may be prepared for each Committee.

That such books and sheets be provided at the expense of the Nuisance Committee,

That the Nuisance Committee be requested to take the Police informations prior to the other cases reported in order that the Officers and Constables may be more speedily relieved and enabled to return to their duties.

In addition it only remains to suggest that it be expressly understood that and arranged that no interference whatsoever be permitted on the part of the Police Force with the officers acting under the direction of the Nuisance Committee or the reverse but that all communications or directions which may be required shall be made through the respective committees.

Also that the Nuisance Committee or their Officers shall alone be responsible for the collection of all fines which may be imposed and that the interference and the responsibility of the Police in all cases shall cease so soon as the case has been brought before and adjudicated upon by the Nuisance Committee, except when the offending party is ordered to be summoned before the Borough Court in which case the Officers shall be required to attend; of which sufficient notice in writing is to be sent to the respective Superintendents.

Upon careful consideration the undersigned have in consequence of the representations made by the Chief Constable and by all the Superintendents of the Force determined to recommend that no deposit in money shall on any pretence whatsoever be allowed to be taken by the Police.

It has been urge with great force that in spite of all the precautions which can be taken if money is allowed under any circumstances to be received by the Police either at the Station or elsewhere temptations to dishonesty which it is so desirable to avoid will inevitably be offered and although resisted will assuredly expose the Police to injurious even if unfounded suspicions.

The undersigned feel strongly the force of the objections which have been strenuously urged and therefore recommend the Committee until they have had reason to change to adopt the plan proposed.

The undersigned have had no opportunity of conferring with the members of the Nuisance Committee: who although twice summoned, it is presumed were unable to attend when the undersigned met to consider their report.

The undersigned also deputed to confer with the deputation from the the Lamp &c Committee for the purpose stated annex a copy of the report agreed to by the undersigned and the Gentlemen appointed by the Lamp &c Committee.

W. Neild

P. Willert

W. Callender

Thos. Handley


Meeting 7th March 1844


Memorandum

The following extracts from the minutes of the Nuisance Committee were read:

That in order that no difficulty may hereafter arise in the discharge of of the duties assigned to the Police in the suppression of offences against the provisions of the Local Acts, the several members of the Police Force now or at any time hereafter in the employ of the Watch Committee to aid and assist in the suppression of all nuisances and offences against any of the Local A at present in force within the Township of Manchester; and they are hereby appointed for that purpose officers of the council.

That the Gas, Improvement and Watch Committees be requested to give the necessary instructions for the regular daily cleansing of the footpaths opposite to their respective premises.


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be requested to give the necessary instructions to the Officers having charge of the various stations for the daily cleansing of the footpaths opposite their respective Station Houses.


Meeting 21st March 1844


Resolved

That the following persons having appeared before the committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

John Fell Thomas Critchlow
Richard Ward John Hall



Resolved

That Police Constable Thomas Whitney is hereby appointed Sub-Inspector in place of Charles Dale.


Resolved

That Sub-Inspector Johnson of the D Division be transferred to and hereafter attached to the E Division of the Force. And that the Chief Constable be authorise and directed to bring forward a Constable for appointment as Sub-Inspector in the D Division in place of Johnson removed.


Memorandum

The following report in reference to the criminal and statistical returns prepared by the Chief Constable and also in relation to the expenses of the Force having been read.

In submitting to the Council the statistical returns connected with the working of the Police Force of the Borough together with other information connected with the Police department prepared and obtained with great labour and industry by and under the direction of the Chief Constable, the Watch Committee have deemed it expedient also to prepare such a financial statement as will enable the Council to judge how far the advantages usually anticipated and especially in an economical point of view from self government have been realised: and the Watch Committee have much pleasure in directing attention to this part of the report affording strong evidence that the inhabitants of the Borough have good reason to feel satisfied that the management and control of the Police has been transferred from the Commissioner appointed by the Crown to the Watch Committee appointed by the Council.

The Council will recollect that the control of the Police was vested in Sir Charles Shaw from the first day of October 1839 until the 1st day of October 1842 when the management was again resumed by the Watch Committee of the Council.

The number of the Force including all ranks on the day prior to the Watch Committee resuming control amounted to 318 persons but a careful calculation made from the daily returns for the previous three years gives 328 persons as the average number and strength of the Force including all ranks during that period.

In the above numbers however there were during a period of 21 months a class of 50 men who were employed at wages of 14/- per week only, and also during a period of about two months another class averaging 20 persons employed at 7/- per week only, and of course the addition of these two classes at such reduced wages has the effect of making the average strength of the Force appear greater for the amount of money expended than could have been shewn if all the Constables employed had received the usual wages of 17/- per week.

During the period from the 17th October 1839 to 1st October1842 the gross expenditure on account of the Force amounted to £69895 16s 2 1/4d; the average annual expense to £23622 3s 10 3/4d; and the annual average cost admitting the average strength of 328 persons to £70 0s 4 1/2d.

The Police Force as organised by the Watch Committee including all ranks numbers 390 persons , and in addition there are 12 supernumeraries of whom 8 are computed to be daily called upon, making the total number constantly in the pay of the Watch Committee and of whom none receive less than 17/- per week average 398 persons.

In an estimate submitted by the Chief Constable to and approved by the Watch Committee on the 30th April 1843 in which provisions was made for supplying one pair of trousers to the Constables, it was stated that the sum which would be required for the maintenance of the Police Force for one year from 1st May 1843 to 30th April 1844 would be £22849 9s 9d being an average expense for each individual of £57 8s 2 1/2d. It was at the same time stated that Chief Constable that in those years in which a complete suit of clothing, including great coat body coat, hat and two pairs of trousers, was applied to the force the sum of £24461 4s 2d would be required, being an average expense for each individual of £61 9s 2 1/4d.

The Watch Committee are now however able to test the accuracy of the estimates submitted by the Chief Constable by a comparison with the actual expenditure on account of the Force during a corresponding period of time. The total expenditure on account of the Force for the year commencing on the 1st October 1842 and ending on the 30th September 1843 has been £22872 19s 4d. In this expenditure however is included the cost of a complete suit of clothing , also of all the necessary articles of equipment (of which the Police were nearly destitute) and also several other extraordinary and unusual items of expenditure amounting together to the sun of £500.

The Watch Committee further find that the gross sum which has been expended in the maintenance of the Police Force from the period when the Committee resumed the control to the present time viz from the 1st of October 1842 to the 29th February 1844 amounted has amounted to the sum of £32635 6s 0d being an average for 12 months of the sum £23036 13s 8d. In this amount however in addition to those charges which have just referred to, are included other extraordinary charges amounting to upwards of the £500 for which in the estimate no provision was made by the Chief Constable.

It will thus be seen that the actual expenditure has been £1424 10s 6d less than the amount which it was estimated by the Chief Constable would be required in those years when clothing would have to be applied for without providing for the expense of equipment or the payment of the extraordinary charges before alluded to.

From the following table it will be seen that the gross annual expense of the Force under the Watch Committee has been £585 10s 2 3/4d less than the yearly expense of the Force whilst under and management of the Government Commissioner notwithstanding that 70 additional men have been maintained and the average pay the Constables has been on a higher scale.



Average Relative Strength

Rates of Pay Allowed

Average Yearly Expenditure

Average Costs Per Head

Police Force from October 1839 to October 1842

328

7/- per week

14/- per week

17/- per week

£23622 3s 10 1/4d

£72 0s 4 1/2d

Police Force from October 1842 to the end of January 1844

398

17/- per week

£23036 13s 8d

£57 17 7 1/2d

 

The Watch Committee have much satisfaction in directing the attention of the Council to the information which is communicated in the following table.

The information so far as relates to the City Police is obtained from a report recently made by the Commissioner to the Lord Mayor and so far as relates to the Metropolitan Force from a statement said to have been prepared from official documents which has recently appeared in the London papers.


CITY OF LONDON POLICE

Amount of Population Within the Police Limits

Number of the Force

Gross Annual Cost

Cost Per Man

Cost Per Head According to the Population

14096

543

£41,351  0s  0d

£ 76 3s 0d

5s  10d


METROPOLITAN POLICE

Amount of Population Within the Police Limits

Number of the Force

Gross Annual Cost

Cost Per Man

Cost Per Head According to the Population

2032458

4685

£289,322  0s  0d

£61  15s  1d

2s  10d

 

MANCHESTER POLICE FORCE

Amount of Population Within the Police Limits

Number of the Force

Gross Annual Cost

Cost Per Man

Cost Per Head According to the Population

235139

398

£23,O36  13s  8d

£57  17s  7½d

1s  11½d

 

The Watch Committee consider that little observation or comment on the preceding statement and on the returns now submitted is required . The increase and growing efficiency of the Police Force of this Borough not in numbers only, but in what the Committee consider far more important in moral influence is universally admitted. The Magistrates frequently express their approbation of the satisfactory manner in which the cases are brought before the Court by the Police and constant testimony is borne by the Grand Juries both at the Assizes and Sessions to the Constables manner in which the evidence is given by the members of the Manchester Force.

The Watch Committee has also much satisfaction in adding that so far as they are able to judge from the experience which they necessarily obtain of its daily working the Police Force is fully entitled to the credit given them by those whose official duties have afforded them the opportunity of judging and to the favourable opinion which the Committee feel assure will be the result of a careful consideration of the details of the present report.

The Watch Committee cannot conclude this report without bearing their unqualified testimony to the highly satisfactory manner in which in which the duties devolving upon the Chief Constable have been discharged by Captain Willis and congratulating the Council upon having been so fortunate as to secure his valuable services for the Borough. Whilst it has been the Chief Constable's constant anxiety to do everything to render the Force under his control as efficient as possible he has been most unremitting his endeavours to introduce the most rigid system of economy; and the success of his efforts is abundantly shown in the preceding statement and in the returns which are now submitted for the consideration of the Council.


Meeting 4th April 1844


Memorandum

The following extracts from the minutes of the Nuisance Committee proceedings on the 3rd April were read:

That the Watch Committee be respectfully requested to swear in as Constables John Lever and John Wallworth the two last appointed Inspectors of Nuisance.

That the Watch Committee be informed that this Committee object to a Police Constable being required to attend the meetings of this committee to record its decisions in the nuisances cases reported by the Police Constables, but have no objection to the Officers attending to arrange and call in their cases the decisions  of which shall be recorded by a member of this Committee and the Book (signed by the Chairman) returned to the Officers after the cases are disposed of.


Memorandum

In compliance with the request of the Nuisance Committee John Lever and John Wallworth were sworn in to act as Constables of the Borough.


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be instructed to see the chairman of Nuisance Committee and explain to him the arrangements made in accordance with the suggestions contained in the report presented to this Committee on the 29th February, as to the way in which the nuisances cases reported by the Police are to brought before the Nuisance Committee.


Resolved

That John Claridge having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed a Constable of the Borough.



Meeting 11th April 1844

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

John Egerton John Wilkie
Bartholomew Conway George Worthington
Roger Huxley Samuel Matthews


Meeting 18th April 1844


Memorandum

Letter from the Town Clerk of Belfast requesting information as to the Police establishment read out.


Resolved

That the letter now read out be referred to the Chief Constable with instructions to supply such information as he can conveniently can in reply to such letter.


Memorandum

The following resolution adopted at the Council meeting on 17th April was read out:

That the report of the Watch Committee on the Police Establishment and the State of Crime in the Borough this day presented by the Committee to the Council, with the returns therein referred to, be approved, and that the same be printed under the directions of the Watch Committee: and that a copy be sent to each member of the Council, and to the Borough Magistrates, and that the Mayor be requested to transmit a copy to the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Home Department.


Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the Nuisance Committee's proceedings on 17th April was read:

That the Watch Committee be requested to give instructions to the Police Constables to pay particular attention to the nuisances caused by parties emptying their Chamber Utensils in the streets during the night.


Resolved

That the Resolution now read be referred the Chief Constable.


Memorandum

A resolution of the Nuisance Committee on 17th April addressed to the Chief Constable relative to the attendance of an Officer during the hearing of Nuisance Cases was read.


Resolved

That as there appears from the Resolution of the Nuisance Committee now read to be some misunderstanding on their part of the views of this Committee in recommending the attendance of a Police Inspector in Nuisance Cases – the Nuisance Committee be referred to the invariable practice ion Courts Of Justice where the Officer on duty calls on the cases and is present during the hearing and at its decision – and be respectfully informed that unless one of their own officers has this opportunity of knowing the conduct of the Police Constables reporting nuisance cases it will be impossible, in the opinion of this Committee for the requisite control to be maintained.

That The Nuisance Committee be therefore respectfully requested to allow the Officer on duty to hear the evidence of the Police Constable preferring each charge and be called in to hear and record the judgement of the Committee.

That a copy of this resolution be transmitted to the Nuisance committee.


Resolved

That Police Constable John Beatty is hereby appointed Sub-Inspector in place of Thomas Maybury reduced to the Ranks.


Resolved

That Police Constable Joseph Fox is hereby appointed Sub-Inspector in the D Division in place of Sub-Inspector Johnson transferred to the Detective Department.


Resolved

That John Burgess and George Mosley having appeared before this Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough.


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be authorised and instructed to get the various articles of furniture as enumerated in the report made by him in his Report Book required for the Fairfield Street Station, together with other trifling articles which he may find requisite.

Resolved

That the Chief Constable be at liberty to enter upon the occupation of the Fairfield Street Station so soon as the necessary requisites for furnishing the same are provided.


Meeting 25th April 1844

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before this Committee are hereby appointed Constables of this Borough: Charles Barnes, Henry Dobb and Edward Rawnsley.

Resolved

That this Committee having found that inconvenience has arisen to the working of the Force from the Constables' neglecting their duties for the purpose of calling up [knocking up] inhabitants – and it appears that there are numbers of private individuals also employed in all the districts of the Borough in calling up parties independent of the Police , notice be given that after the 1st day of May next the Police will be prohibited calling up any inhabitant.

That the Chief Constable be directed to give the necessary instruction to the Police , and also to prepare a printed notice to be forthwith distributed amongst all the parties who now avail themselves of the services of the police in being called up.

Resolved
That in the opinion of this Committee four additional Inspectors are required for the efficient performance of the business connected with the four Divisions and also another  clerk for the Chief Constable's office.

That such appointments be made at a subsequent meeting and that the wages to be paid in respect of the same be and hereby fixed at the amounts:

the four Inspectors at 30/- per week

Clerk for the Chief Constable's Office at 20/- per week.

Resolved

That the six Beats now reported by the Chief Constable to be vacant be filled up by the appointment of additional Constables on the 1st October next.


Meeting 2nd May 1844


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

Thomas Barber John Walton
John Cameron John Dolan
Thomas Dodson Thomas Kinsey


Meeting 9th May 1844

Resolved

That Robinson Lowcock having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed a Constable of the Borough.

Memorandum

Read a letter from Mr Naylor Clerk to the Commissioners of the Township of Hulme requesting that the services of the Police might be continued for the calling up of the Lamplighter in that Township in the morning.

Ordered

That a copy of the resolution of this Committee on the 25th April last in reference to the calling up of inhabitants early in the morning be transmitted to Mr Naylor as an answer to the letter addressed by him to the Chief Constable now read.


Meeting 16th May 1844

Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the Manchester Nuisances Committee proceedings:

Resolved that the Watch Committee be informed that their Officers will be allowed the same privileges as the Officers of this Committee.

Meeting 23rd May1844

Resolved

That the the following persons having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: John Ollier, William Weekes and William Scott.

Memorandum

It having been reported by the Chief Constable that many parties unconnected with the Police had assumed the authority of Police Constables.

Resolved

That a Warrant Card in the form now submitted by the Chief Constable be furnished to each Officer and Constable of the Force to be exhibited when on duty and not wearing Police uniform when his authority to act as a Police Constable of the Borough is called into question.

Ordered

That the following advertisement be inserted in all the Manchester Newspapers of Saturday 1st June next:

The Watch Committee of the Council hereby give notice that in consequence of certain parties not belonging to the Police Force having assumed the authority of Police Constables, each member of the Force is now supplied with a Warrant Card containing his name number and the date of his appointment under the signature of the Chief Constable, and countersigned by the Superintendent of the Division of the Force he is attached.

Every Officer when on duty and not wearing uniform is instructed to exhibit his Warrant Card whenever his authority to act as a Constable for the Borough is called into question.


Meeting 6th June 1844

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough.

 

Patrick Wheelan Thomas Oldfield
William Chappell Henry Rothwell


Meeting 13th June 1844

Memorandum

In submitting the annexed estimate for the maintenance and equipment of the Police Force for the current year viz from the 1st day of May 1844 to the 30th day of April 1845 the Chief Constable informs the Committee that the increased amount which is stated will be required beyond the estimate submitted last year and also beyond the estimate submitted last year and also beyond the sun of £24,461 (which the Chief Constable; when presenting last years estimate informed the Committee would probably always be required in those years when a full and complete suit of clothing including great coat, body coat, hat, cape, armlet, and two pairs of trousers had to be supplied to the Force arises from the following causes viz

Pay of 4 additional Inspectors now on probation say from the 1st August 1844 to 30th April 1845 £234   0s 0d
Pay of 6 Constables to complete the Beats from the 1st August 1844 to 30th April 1845 £154  14s 0d
Pay of additional clerk now on the strength and pay of the Force £52   0s 0d
Difference in pay between a Constable and a Sub-Inspector for Johnson promoted in E Division to take charge of the Upper Court £20  16s 0d
Clothing for 4 Inspectors at £8.00 each£32   0s 0d
Clothing for 6 Constables at £6.00 each£36   0s 0d
Extra expenses consequent upon maintaining the New Fairfield Street Station in gas, water, taxes and other contingencies£21   0s 0d
Total £550 10s 0d


The additional expense of £550 consequent upon the increase of 4 Inspectors and 6 Constables 1 clerk and an additional Police Station if added to the £24,461 (the sum which the Chief Constable stated would be required in those years when a complete outfit of clothing had to be supplied) would make the estimate amount to £25,011 but from experience in working the Force the Chief Constable is enabled to assure the Committee that including all items of expenditure and without taking credit for any deductions from sickness or other causes the expense will not exceed the amount of the estimate now submitted viz£24,829 and in this amount provision is made to supply each Officer and Constable with a complete suit of clothing including great coat, body coat, hat, cape, armlets and 2 pairs of trousers at the following rates Viz Inspectors at £8, Sub-Inspectors at £7 and Police Constables at £6.

There are however deductions which the Committee might fairly make from the estimate as presented for stoppages in sickness and for monies received from individuals requiring special services of the Police, which in the last year amounted to upwards of £220 and which will most probably amount as large a sum during the present year. As however there is some uncertainty about these amounts, the Chief Constable has omitted credit for them in this estimate.


Resolved

Find My Past

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: Thomas Mulroy and Hugh Smith.


Meeting 20th June 1844

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

C Division D Division
Michael Lennon William Hulme
James Platt George Hesketh
George Barnsley Samuel Jones


Meeting 27th June 1844

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

C Division D Division
James Grantham William Peacock
Peter Moore Robert Burstead


Meeting 4th July 1844

Memorandum

The following letter was read:

66 Gt Jackson St

Hulme

3rd July 1844

Gentlemen,


Being desirous of obtaining an official and true copy of the entry in the police Sheet of an occurrence which took place in Albion St near the Iron Bridge, Gaythorn on the evening of 27th January last in consequence of which a man got his leg broken and also being desirous to obtain the attendance tomorrow evening of Inspectors Leary and Rooke to state to a Society that the facts as they came under their notice I should feel obliged if I could be favoured with a copy of Report and with the attendance of the above officers. The above case refers to the charge which was brought against Sub-Inspector Clarke at the Borough Court and which was to have been tried at the Sessions; but the parties concerned did not carry forward that case.

The man who had his leg broken in the affray on the 27th January having brought a certain charge against against one as Medical Officer to the Society of which he is a member in the cause of any requiring a copy of the report in the Police Sheet and the attendance of the officers named to justify the report I made on the occasion.

Martin Sinclair

Surgeon


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be authorised to allow the two Officers named to attend as requested and also allow Inspector Leary to exhibit to the parties referred to in Mr Sinclair's letter the report made of the occurrence to the Chief Constable.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

William Barrow Henry Boam
John Pearson William Yarwood
John Penlington  


RETURN TO THE TOP OF THE PAGE

Meeting 25th July 1844

Memorandum

The following report of the Town Clerk was read out:

The Town Clerk reports that in the absence of Alderman Callender he had made the following arrangement with the Chairman of the Nuisance Committee for the disposal of all cases reported by the Police-

That 2 books should be provided for for entering the cases reported by the Police. That all cases reported from Divisions A + B shall be copied in one of such books and all the case reported from Divisions C + D in the other book. That hereafter the Police cases shall be numbered commencing with No 1 with the 1st case in the A Division and numbered consecutively in the precise order in which they appear on the sheets returned from each Division.

That the cases shall be hereafter copied in the books laid before the Nuisance Committee the exact order in which they appear on the sheets sent from each Division and in that order called in for hearing before the Committee.


Resolved

That it is desirable that the closing of Public House, Coffee Houses and all other places of public resort at 12 o'clock to be strictly enforced and that the Chief Constable be and is hereby direct to give the necessary directions for reporting all parties offending against the 202 and 203 sections of the Borough Police Act

Resolved

That in order to give intimation to all parties indicated the following notice be inserted in all the Manchester papers on Saturday the 27th July instant. And that the same be also placarded throughout the Borough. And also be printed in a convenient form and a copy of such notice left at every house within the Borough subject to the operations of the provisions therein referred to.


POLICE NOTICE


Closing of Public Houses, Coffee Houses and all other places of Public resort.

By the 202 clause of the 7 + 8 Victoria C41 (The Borough Police Act) it is enacted “That no Licensed Victualler or other person shall open his house for the sale of wine, spirits, beer or other fermented or distilled liquors or permit the same to be sold therein on Sundays, Christmas day and Good Friday, before the hour of 12 of the clock at noon under a penalty not exceeding five pounds for each offence provided that nothing herein contained shall extend to prevent refreshment to travellers.”

By the 203 Clause of the said Act it is enacted “ That no person who shall have or keep any house, shop, room, cellar or vault or place of public resort wherein ready made tea or coffee, provisions, liquors, or refreshments of any kind shall be sold or consumed (whether the same shall be be kept or retailed therein or procured elsewhere shall open open his house shop room cellar or vault or place of public resort for the sale of such coffee, tea, provisions, liquors or refreshments on Sundays, Christmas Day, and Good Friday before the hour of six o'clock in the morning or between the hours of ten and twelve o'clock at noon under a penalty not exceeding five pounds for each offence: providing that nothing herein contained shall extend to prevent refreshments to travellers.”

The Watch Committee earnestly call the attention of all parties interested to the above important enactments and hereby give notice that orders have been given to the police to report all parties offending by keeping open or allowing persons to remain in their houses after 12 o'clock on Saturday evening or otherwise contrary to the provisions of the said statute.


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

James Brocklehurst Thomas Vernon
John Wildgoose William Bamber
Noah Pearson  


Meeting 1st August 1844

Resolved that the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: Isaac Edge and Thomas Allen.

 

Meeting 15th August 1844

Resolved

That in the opinion of this committee there is not in any of the cases now read relating to the service of Officers in the E or Detective Division of the Force, any circumstances to induce this Committee to swerve from the general rule laid down that this Committee cannot give rewards for services performed by the Officers in that Division unless under very peculiar circumstances, as the whole of their time is devoted to the detection of Offenders.

Resolved

That Sub-Inspectors John Dixon, Joseph Sutton, Richard Harris, William Martin and Edward Gosling having appeared before the Committee, be and they are hereby appointed Inspectors at the rate of pay of 30/- per week to supply the vacancies now existing in that rank in the Force.

Resolved

That Police Constables Dennis Callinan, Miles Thompson , William, Holmes and John Hall having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Sub-Inspectors at the pay of 25/- per week to fill up the vacanicies in the Force occasioned by the appointments before made.


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed police Constables:

 

Robert Morgan Peter Holme
William Duke Matthew Durham

 


Meeting 22nd August 1844

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables: Jerry Longbottom and Robert Smith.

 

Meeting 5th September 1844


Resolved

That the following persons having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

James Platt Henry Cooper
Thomas Holme Roger Rowcliffe
Peter Shenton Henry Fielding
Charles Wood James Catlow


Report to Full Council

Your committee on the 29th August last being their first meeting after their attention had been called to the fact of such publication proceeded to inquire under what circumstances the letter bearing date the 19th day of August and addressed by J McCallan Inspector of Police at Bristol to Mr Superintendent Taylor of the Borough Police as to the character of the prisoner Evans recently committed to take his trial for the murder of Jane Miller in Hulme on the 13th day of August had appeared in the public papers.

Your Committee had no difficulty in ascertaining the facts which were at once frankly communicated by Mr Taylor who states that he having to attend at the Borough Court on the 20th of August being the day that such letter was received he handed it to the Clerk of the Magistrates in order that it might be shown to and read by Mr Maude by whom the prisoner Evans had been committed. That after the letter had been returned by Mr Higson to Mr Taylor he allowed it to be read by Mr Bent and also by Mr Harding who were seated near to him and subsequently by two reporters who were also seated at the table. On the following the Wednesday the letter appeared in the Manchester Guardian and on the 24th day of August in the Manchester Advertiser, as also The Manchester Courier. Mr Taylor has not attempted in any way to justify his imprudent conduct but on the contrary has expressed to your Committee his deep regret that by his culpable want of caution and consideration in this instance he should have rendered himself to a certain extent responsible from the serious consequences which have resulted by the improper publication of the letter referred to.

Your Committee have considered it to be their duty to to express to Mr Superintendent Taylor in strong terms their opinion that he has in this instance been guilty of most inconsiderate and reprehensible conduct in having allowed so important a document to be seen by any parties, much less by any through whose instrumentality there was the slightest chance not to say probability that its contents would be made known to to the Public but at the same time your Committee have felt justified in stating to Mr Taylor their conviction that such conduct has arisen from momentary thoughtlessness and that considering the deep regret he has expressed that through his inconsiderate conduct the contents of the letter should have become public your Committee feel assured that he will not again lay himself open to any similar charge.

Your Committee find that Mr Taylor first became connected with the Manchester Police as a Police constable in July 1833 that his good conduct soon received his promotion and that in consequence of his exemplary behaviour he has steadily continued to rise from one rank to another until in the month of November 1842 he was appointed to one of the most important and confidential situations in the Police establishment viz to be Superintendent of one of the Divisions.

That in every situation he has at all times hitherto discharged his duties in a manner highly satisfactory and has in no instance appeared before the Committee except to receive awards for meritorious conduct.

Your committee whilst they deeply regret the circumstances which have occurred judging from the past conduct of Mr Taylor during the many years that he has been connected with the Police have every reason to hope that his subsequent conduct will be such as to satisfy all parties that to momentary thoughtlessness alone is to be ascribed his present position and to justify your Committee in still reposing confidence in him as one of their Superintendents.


Meeting 12th September 1844

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: George Bartley and Samuel Hemstock.


Meeting 26th September 1844

Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the proceedings of the Manchester Lamp, Scavenging + Hackney Coach Committee of the 23rd instant was read:-

Resolved

That the Watch Committee be requested to swear in as Constables of the Borough James Edwards Inspector of Hackney Coaches for the Township and Samuel Hipwell assistant Inspector.

Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the proceedings of the Manchester Nuisance Committee was also read:

Resolved

That the Watch Committee be requested to direct the Police Constables to pay strict attention to carts and carriages not keeping on the near side of the street or otherwise unnecessarily obstructing the public thoroughfare, contrary to the 102nd clause of the Borough Police Act.


Ordered

That the Chief Constable give the necessary instruction to the Police Officers for enforcing a compliance with the 102nd Clause of the Borough Police Act relating to the regulation of Carts and Carriages in the public streets within the Borough, public notices to that effect having been previously given by placard or otherwise as the Chief Constable may think desirable.

Resolved

That the Clothing Committee be authorised to obtain forthwith new great coats for the whole of the Force and to order such of the old ones as are repairable to be repaired for [reserved] use.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

Adam Mills Samuel McLoughlin
Samuel Almack Thomas Barnes
John Milkwood John Crowe


Meeting 3rd Oct 1844

Memorandum

An extract from the minutes of the proceedings of the Manchester Nuisance Committee on 25th September 1844 was read requesting the Committee to sear in as a Constable John Smith Night Inspector of Nuisances.

Memorandum

In compliance with the request of the Manchester Lamp &c Committee and also of the Manchester Nuisance Committee the following parties were sworn in as Constables of the Borough:

 

James Edwards Inspector of Hackney Coaches
Samuel Hipwell Assistant Inspector of Hackney Coaches
John Smith Night Inspector of Nuisances


Resolved

That Police Constables John Sandford and Thomas Dodgson having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Sub-Inspectors to supply the vacancies in that rank in the D Division.

Resolved

That Charles Ede and William Risley having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables.


Meeting 10th October 1844

Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the Chorlton upon Medlock Committee's proceedings on the 8th Oct 1844 were read out

Resolved that the Watch Committee be requested to report to instruct the Police to report to this Committee any offence committed within the Township the section of the 103rd clause of the Borough Police Act relating to “Female servants standing outside any window to clean same”, - such practice being prevalent within this Township.

Resolved

That the Chief Constable be instructed to give directions to the Police to report all such offences committed within any parts of the Borough.

Resolved

That the salary of Captain Willis as the Chief Constable of this Borough be raised to the sum of £500 pe annum from the 29th September last. And that a further sum of £50 per annum be allowed to him in consideration of and to defray the contingent expenses to which he is necessarily put in the discharge of his duties.

Resolved

That this Committee record the sense which they unanimously entertain of the highest satisfactory manner in which Captain Willis has discharged his duties as Chief Constable , and especially of the anxiety whiich he constantly manifests to carry out the strictest economy in the arrangements connected with the Police Force.


Meeting 17th October 1844

Resolved

That Richard Fitzcroft having appeared before this committee is hereby appointed a Constable of the Borough.

Resolved Unanimously

That this Committee record the sense which they unanimously entertain of the highly satisfactory manner in which Captain Willis has discharged his duties as Chief Constable and of the anxiety of which he constantly manifests to carry out the strictest economy in the arrangements connected with the Police Force.

Resolved

That the salary of Captain Willis as the Chief Constable of this Borough be raised to the sum of £500 per annum from the 29th September last. And that the further sum of £50 per annum be allowed to him in consideration of and to defray the contingent expenses to which he is necessarily put in the discharge of his duties.


Meeting 24th October 1844

Resolved that the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

John Hardy John Hamilton
Thomas Cantrell Charles Kearnan
Noah Bickerton  



Meeting 31st October 1844

Memorandum

The following letter to the Borough treasurer was read out:

Sir, I am requested to by Mrs Sarah Richardson of No 270 Deansgate to offer for your consideration premises situated at the junction of Swan St with St Georges Rd, and formerly known by the name of Swan St Lockups, as being now at liberty, Mrs Richardson trusts, that should you deem it advisable to re-establish a Borough Lockups on the same site, you will on inspection find the above premises most eligible for the purpose, having been built by her late husband according to plan and specification furnished to him by the Commissioners of Police.

I am Sir,

your obedient servant,

James Glover

Mrs R will feel obliged by your taking the matter into consideration and favouring her with an answer at your convenience.

Resolved

That the above be postponed for consideration until after the appointment of the Committee fro the ensuing year.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: John Oliver, George Lingard and David Lockwood.

Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the Nuisance Committee on the 30th October was read:

That the Memorial now read from the inhabitants of Coup St be referred to the Watch Committee, and that they be requested to direct their Officers to pay particular attention to the complaints mentioned therein.

Resolved

That the Memorial alluded to in the extract now read be referred to Captain Willis with the instructions to report thereon.

 

Meeting 7th November 1844

Resolved

That the Nuisance Committee be informed that the Memorial of the inhabitants of Coup St referred by them to this Committee, has been referred to the Chief Constable, with instructions to direct the Police to interfere so far as they have power, in order to prevent the obstructions in Coup St complained by the memoralists.


Meeting 14th November 1844

The following parties having appeared before the committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

Patrick Walsh Job Wildgoose
Joseph Mould Noah Bagshaw
Ralph Lees William Sanders
John SheldonRalph Eyre
Samuel GratrixWilliam Boardman
John SimmsRichard Cantrell



Meeting 21st November 1844

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

Joseph Dyer, Moses Chappell and William Gill.


Meeting 28th November 1844

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: Samuel White and John Jones.

Memorandum

A report having been made by the Chief Constable that unnecessary inconvenience and difficulty arises to the public in re-obtaining possession of property taken by the Police to the Town's Yard, in consequence of the difficulty of obtaining an order for that purpose from the Superintendent of Nuisance Inspectors, Mr Neale, to give such order, being frequently in the performance of his duties taken away from the Town Hall.

Resolved

That, in order that no unnecessary inconvenience or difficulty may hereafter arise to the public in obtaining possession of their property it is desirable that the Superintendents of Divisions, or other principal Officers for the time being, on duty at the several Police Stations should be enabled to give, in all cases where in their opinion the circumstances aberrant the doing so, the requisite authority in writing, to the party in charge, for the delivery of any property which may be taken by the Police Officers to the Town's Yard.

That a copy of this resolution be transmitted to the Nuisance Committee, and that they will be requested to concur with this Committee in the arrangement, and to give the necessary orders for the same being carried into effect.


Meeting 12th December 1844

Memorandum

The following Extracts from the minutes of the Paving and Loughing committee on the 11th December was read viz;

That the Nuisance and the Watch Committees be requested to direct their Officers to report in future to this Committee all cases of encroachment upon, or interference of any kind with the streets or footpaths of the Township of Manchester.

Resolved

That the chief Constable give directions that all cases of the description named in the resolution now read, shall be hereafter report to the Paving and Loughing Committee.

Resolved

That Police Constable John Reddish, A Division and police Constable Richard Ward, B Division having appeared before this Committee be and hereby are promoted to the rank of Sub-Inspector at the pay of 25/- per week.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

Thomas Rowbottom Joseph Needham
James Ratcliffe James Wood
Joseph Holme Thomas Gastin
Henry Dalton 


Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the Nuisance Committee 0n the 11th December was read out:

That a copy of the following report be transmitted to the Watch Committee in answer to their resolution of the 28th November last. That this Committee are anxious as far as possible to prevent unnecessary difficulty or delay in the delivery of strayed cattle or other articles found in the streets and taken to the Town's Yard for safety by the Police.

The 90th clause of the Borough Police Act provides, that the owners of cattle &c which may have been seized and impounded shall pay a sum of money not exceeding five shillings for each animal so impounded: it has been the practise of the Nuisance Committee acting under the late Commissioners of the Police, as also the Town Council to inflict a fine in nearly all cases, and it appears desirable that such a practice should be continued. In order to prevent any delay in the delivery of any cattle or other articles in future the Police, not being allowed in any case to receive a deposit, the Committee have given directions that Nathaniel Booth the Store Keeper at the Police Yard shall deliver up all the cattle or other articles, which may be taken to the Town's yard by the Police, on receiving an order signed by any of the Superintendents of Police, or by the Inspector on duty , on condition that the party applying for, or claiming any such cattle or other articles, pay the expenses incurred and deposit, according to the following scale:

For every basket, hamper, tub, stall or barrow (not being a night soil barrow) 1 shilling
For every night soil barrow 2 shillings and 6 pence
For every hand cart (extraordinary cases excepted) 2 shillings and 6 pence
For every pig, sheep or dog2 shillings and 6 pence
For every horse and cart 5 shillings
For every cow or single horse5 shillings

That the Nuisance Committee hope that the arrangements proposed will prevent any unnecessary inconvenience, and at the same time secure proper attention to the provisions of the Police Act.

Meeting 19th December 1844

Resolved

That George Foster and Robert Lees having appeared before this Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough.

Ordered

That notice be given in the circulars convening the next meeting , that the vacancy in the office of Superintendent occasioned by the resignation of Mr Stephenson, will be filled up: and, that the following Inspectors be directed to attend before the Committee: Inspector Leary, Inspector Pierce, Inspector Hickey and Inspector Saynor.


Meeting 26th December 1844


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared having appeared before the committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: Nathan Woodruffe Ashton, George Skelton, Enoch Beswick and Thomas Brownhill.


Resolved

That Inspector Leary is hereby appointed Superintendent of the B Division at a salary of £150 per annum, and to enter upon duty on the 1st January next.

RETURN TO THE TOP OF THE PAGE

 

Meeting 2nd January 1845

Resolved

That the following parties appeared before the Committee and are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: George Twigge and Thomas Mara.

 

Report by the Chief Constable

I beg respectfully to offer to your consideration...the following suggestions for the establishment of a Class of merit at an advanced rate of pay with a view of increasing the efficiency of the Police Service by offering additional advantages to the well behaved and more intelligent and efficient members of the Force.

With respect to the Merit Class, I propose that the amount of wages shall be 18/- per week, and that it shall not be limited in numbers, but open to every Constable who shall be considered deserving of the advancement: so that an inducement may thus continually held out to every Officer so to behave himself as to obtain such promotion, and that non to feel, that if deserving, his promotion will be delayed in consequence of the number of Merit Class being filled up.

I further propose that each Constable who is placed in the Merit Class shall in addition to the increase in pay have a distinguishing badge, such as a stripe or some other device placed on the right arm above the elbow: and that after each years service without having committed any act of misconduct , a small gratuity should be presented to him by the Committee as an additional mark of their approbation.

The particular qualifications which I think it desirable each Constable should possess before being promoted are: that he should a sufficient length of time to have established a good character, and in addittion to have exhibited at all times, intelligence, discretion and activity in the discharge of the duties of a Police officer: a prompt obedience to orders and have shewn by his general conduct an anxiety to promote correct discipline and to bring credit on the Force with which he is associated, and that any Constable be continued in such Class as long as he manifests those qualities which in the first instance secured his promotion.

For mere length of service even if combined with good character unless there had been also the manifestation of intelligence and efficiency in the performance of his duties I should not recommend any Constable for promotion to the Merit Class, nor should I recommend any Constable to be so advanced for any single act of meritorious conduct , but should merely bring him forward for a reward as in ordinary cases.

In most Forces of a similar construction to the Manchester Police viz: the Liverpool, Birmingham, Sheffield, Hull and the new County Police Establishments the first class Constables receive wages of 18/- per week , and in the London Police there are several classes receiving higher rates of weekly pay: 18/6 – 19/6 – 20/6 and 22/6.

I submit a list of Constables whom after careful examination of their conduct during the whole period of their service I can at the present time recommend for advancement to the Merit Class, which if approved of, I should propose to establish on the commencement of the New Year.

The list contains the length of service of each Constable from his first appointment, also the total number of Fines and Rewards which appears to his account in the General Conduct Book since the first day of October 1842 when th e Watch Committee resumed the control of the Police Force

Resolved

That the above is approved and adopted.

Resolved

That this Committee has received and accepted with regret the resignation of Mr C C Stephenson, who has filled the Office of one on the Superintendents of the Police Force of this Borough even since its establishment, after the grant of a Charter of Incorporation, in 1839, both whilst under the direction of the Watch Committee of the Council, - of Sir Charles Shaw as the Commissioner appointed by the Crown, - and also the Watch Committee since they resumed control in October 1842.

That this Committee record their opinion of the intelligence, zeal, and discretion which Mr Stephenson has ever displayed – of his constant anxiety to increase the efficiency and promote the correct discipline of the Force – and of the highly creditable and satisfactory manner in which he has discharged the duties of the responsible and important office which he has held.: by which conduct he has secure the respect and esteem of the various members of the Council who have from time to time acted as members of the Watch Committee.

That this Committee whilst they regret the loss of so valuable an Officer assure Mr Stephenson that he carries away with him the respect of every member and their best wishes for his future welfare, and that he may be successful in his intended undertakings.

The Manchester Guardian reported that the Chairman also stated that he was glad to say that Mr Stephenson had a prospect to better himself

 

Meeting 9th January 1845

Resolved

That in accordance with the recommendation of the Chief Constable the following Constables be and hereby are promoted to the Merit Class of Constables.

A DIVISION
1 Joseph Smith 58 John Savage
18 Dennis Buckley 64 Patrick Stewart
28 Joseph Handcock 65 John Barratt
31 Timothy Daley 66 Samuel Bagnall
37 Patrick Monaghan 67 Samuel Swindells
38 Robert Rogers 74 John McDonald
39 Henry Keenan 80 William Donnican
41 Henry Murphy 81 John Wood
43 William Paul 76 Thomas Bold
46 Richard Cooper 35 John Marsland

 

B DIVISION

7 William Taylor 41 Henry Carpenter
16 Samuel Lightfoot 54 Patrick Lynam
18 John Brierley 56 James Redford
20 John Jones 60 Abraham Lee
21 John Gibson 62 David McBurney
31 Thomas Walker 66 Henry McDonald
32 William Lee 68 Michael Burns
33 Joseph Kirkham 69 George Lee
36 Thomas Smith 70 James Gillespie
40 Matthew Buckley 71 William Scott

C DIVISON

7 Robert Boyes 56 John Bradburn
2 James Marshall 57 Thomas Daley
13 William Barnett 69 Thomas Murphy
32 Thomas Hill 72 George Urian
41 Bernard Reynolds 68 Samuel Lamb
45 William Hewitt   

D DIVISION

3 Edward Harwood 44 Thomas Partington Senior
10 Joseph Keith 45 John Hadfield
18 Samuel Whittaker 48 Robert Breeze
22 Luke Ryan 52William Wheeler
27 Matthew Rogerson 55 John Woodruff
32 Thomas Lamb 62 Thomas Partington Junior
39 Thomas Taylor 65 Henry Hindley
42 John Tolton 69 William Evans

E DIVISION

1 Robert H Jackson 4 Joshua Brown
2 William Kirkwood 5 Darby Moran

  

Meeting 16th January 1845

Resolved
That the Chief Constable be authorised under the direction of the Clothing sub- committee [a sub committee of the Watch Committee] to obtain an additional set of numbers for the great coats as some inconvenience arises from the men having frequently to remove them from the old to the new coats. Also to obtain under the direction of the said sub-committee. Badges for the coats of the Constables promoted to the Class of Merit, according to this day approved of.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee and are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

Thomas Hambleton John Johnston
William Jenkins John Wood
Samuel Watts William Harbridge
Thomas SwindellsDaniel Rogers
George BostonWilliam Cooper
Thomas BancroftJames Wood


Meeting 23rd January 1845

Resolved

That Joseph Froggatt and James Twigge having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough.

Resolved

That Enoch Wynn having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Sub-Inspector of the Force.


Meeting 30th January 1845

Resolved

That it is undesirable to adopt the pattern for the badge with the word “Merit” inserted approved of at the last meeting of this Committee on the 16th day of January . And that it be left to the Clothing Sub-committee to determine what shall be the design adopted, with a view of distinguishing the Police Constables appointed to the Class of Merit.


Meeting 20th February 1845

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

John Wilmott George Holmes
William Chawkley George Platt


Memorandum

A report from the Chief Constable recommending the establishment of a Superannuation fund for the benefit of the Police Force having been read.

Resolved

That in conformity with the powers given by the Borough Police Act, as also by the Municipal Act, a “ Superannuation or Police Relief Fund” be at once established for the purpose of providing a fund , out of which may be paid to members of the Police Force who may receive injuries in the service, or on retirement after long and faithful service, such remuneration either in the form of gratuity, or an annual allowance, as the committee may consider they are entitled to receive.

Resolved

That the report on this subject now presented to the Chief Constable be referred to a sub-committee and that they be requested too consider the recommendations therein contained and to report by to this Committee thereon.

Ordered

That if future the Superintendents be required to appear in uniform; and that a complete suit of uniform be provided in every year under the direction of the Clothing sub-committee for each Superintendent at the expense of this Committee.

Resolved

That in consideration of the additional duties devolving necessarily upon the Superintendent of the A Division, and the numerous calls upon the time and attention of such Superintendent in the evening, and also in consideration of his long and efficient service in connection with the Police Force of Manchester the salary of Mr Sawley Superintendent of the A Division be increased from £180 to £200 per annum from the first day of March next.


Meeting 27th February 1845

Resolved

That the Town Clerk be requested to attend the adjourned Inquest of on the body of Jacob Warburton this afternoon, and adopt such course as he may think advisable, and report thereon to this Committee.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

Thomas Quigley William Bettany
Benjamin Buckley Thomas Walker
Matthew Gahan  


Memorandum

A report of the Chief Constable upon the subject of an assault by Bailiffs upon Inspector Rook having been read,

Resolved

That the prosecution of the Bailiffs who committed an assault on Inspector Rook on the 10th day January last, be conducted under the direction of the Town Clerk at the expense of the Public.

 

Meeting 6th March 1845

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

Rueben Eden John Webster
George Brierley Isaac Broadhurst


Memorandum

The Chief Constable having reported that great inconvenience and annoyance arose from the Police Van having to take up and set down prisoners in Cross Street, and suggesting that such alterations might be made in the premises as would provide accommodation for the van being driven into the yard behind the Town Hall for the purposes of loading and unloading the same, and also that the cells required improved ventilation, which might be secured by providing a passage from the cells to the yard.


Meeting 13th March 1845

Resolved

That Sub-Inspector Fox having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Inspector in the place of David Lipsett, lately resigned.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

John Phillips Edward Hamilton
William Eyres Thomas Wilson
William Knowles Thomas Keeling

Ordered
That the circulars to applicants for appointment as Police Constables requiring their attendance before the Committee be sent postage free.

Memorandum

The following communication to the Watch Committee from the Coroner was read out:

Gentlemen,

I beg respectfully to hand you a copy of the verdict in the case of Jacob Warburton and at the request of the Jurors their remarks upon the subject.

James Chapman, Coroner

60 Fountain St. Feb 28th 1845


Verdict

That the said Jacob Warburton on the twenty fourth day of February in the eight year of the reign of Her present Majesty at the Borough of Manchester died of inflammation of the lungs brought on by exposure to the atmosphere and lying all night without sufficient covering on the flagged floor of a cell in a certain Police Lockup there in which he had been confined on the nineteenth day of February in the year aforesaid aggravated by excessive drinking of Ardent Spirits and not otherwise did die.

Remarks

The Jurors have great doubt as to the propriety of the interference of the Police by which the friends of the deceased were prevented from taking him home. They also strongly recommend that the cells for Incapables should have boarded floors instead of stone ones, by lying on which the lives and the health of the parties confined are endangered, the result of this case evidently proving the present floors of the cells to be bad, and that stretchers or slings be in future used instead of wheelbarrows and handcarts, - a wheelbarrow having been used in this case.


Also the report made by Mr Superintendent Leary to the Chief Constable as to what took place prior to as well as during the holding of the Inquest having been read.

Resolved

That in the opinion of this Committee the conduct of Isaac Philipson, The Coroner's Officer in obtaining for the information of the Coroner the evidence or statement only of the drunken companions of the deceased, who with the deceased were properly taken to and confined in the Station for being drunken and disorderly and the following day brought before the Magistrates and fined, was in the highest degree reprehensible, and calculated (as appears to have been the fact) seriously to interfere with, if not to defeat the needs of Justice, inasmuch as in consequence of such Exparte and incorrect statement, the Coroner was grossly deceived as to the facts and was thereby induced in the opening statement of the nature of this case to the Jury, to create prejudiced against innocent parties not easily removed, which was entirely unsupported by the evidence which was either taken or offered , and which might have lead to most serious consequences.

That a copy of this resolution be transmitted to the Coroner for the Borough by the Town Clerk.


Meeting 20th March 1845

Resolved

That Arnold Quennell having appeared before this Committee is hereby appointed a Constable of the Borough.

Memorandum

The following report in reference to the criminal and other statistical returns prepared by the Chief Constable was read:

Town Hall, Manchester

March 1845


The Chief Constable offers the following observations on the criminal and other statistical returns for the year 1844, now submitted for the information and approval of the Watch Committee.

On reference to Table No 1 of the Criminal returns , the Committee will perceive that the total number of apprehensions from the 1st day of January to the 31st day of December 1844 has amounted to 10,702: being , as will be seen from the following Table a considerable decrease in the number apprehended as compared with the Returns for previous years and exhibiting much fewer apprehensions during the past year than during any year since the establishment of a day and night Police Force within the Borough of Manchester.

Table showing the total numbers of apprehensions in each year since the establishment of a day and night Police, with the decrease in the number of apprehensions for the year 1844 as compared with the previous years.

 

Years Column showing the total number of apprehensions made by the Manchester Police in each year *Balance showing the decrease in the number of apprehensions as compared with each of the previous years
1840 12,417 1,751
1841 13,345 2,643
1842 13,801 3,099
1843 12,147 1,445
1844 *10,702 ------

The decrease in the number of apprehensions which has thus taken place may doubtless be in some measure attributed to the more prosperous state of trade which, as compared with previous years has existed during the period to the present returns relate, at the same time, as it is a fact well known to the Police that there are always a large class of persons who never work, and another class who (although employed and are in receipt of good wages) are in the habit of committing, or attempting to commit robberies and other felonies after their hour of labour, there can be no doubt that the decrease in the number of apprehensions is not to be altogether attributed to the state of trade, but must be partly ascribed to the vigilance of the Police which has tended to a great extent to prevent the commission of crime.

It may also be fairly inferred from the decrease in the number of apprehensions that the Police have judiciously exercised the greatly increased powers with which they have been [given] during a considerable portion of the past year invested by the Manchester Borough Police Act, which authorises the Police to apprehend for a larger class of offences, in relationship to which they had not previously any such power.

The general character of the crime does not differ materially from that which occurred in previous years, although there has been a considerable decrease in several of the more serious offences, viz; classes numbered 2 and 3 such as breaking into premises, robberies from the person, larcenies, and also apprehensions under the vagrants, reputed thieves, and suspicious characters.

The number of apprehensions for assaults on the Police has also considerably diminished and it is hoped that this gratifying fact may in some degree be attributed to the better feeling which now doubtless exists towards the Police, and which has been induced by their own better acquaintance with and discharge of their important duties, and forbearance, which has marked their interference with those whose conduct has unfortunately placed them within their power.

The number of apprehensions for common assault has increased: and this may be accounted for by the fact that the Borough Police Act authorises Police Constables to apprehend parties charged with assaults which the Constables have not witnessed, and which power they did not previously possess.

As respects the summary convictions it will be seen on comparing the returns for the year 1843 with those for the year 1844, that in the former year out of 12,147 apprehensions, there were 2,981 summary convictions, and 758 committals for trial: whilst in the latter year, out of 10,702 apprehensions there have been 3,961 summary convictions, and 691 committals for trial, or an actual increase in the past year of nearly one thousand convictions, although the number of apprehensions has been less by 1445 individuals.

The increase in the number of summary convictions may in great measure be attributed to the provisions contained in the new Police Act which [came] into operation on the 4th day of July 1844 which enabled the Justices to punish by fine or imprisonment parties found drunk, and drunk and disorderly in the streets, and which power has been very frequently exercised: at the same time it is quite true that the charges made by the Police during the past year for offences generally, and the mode in which they given their evidence in support, have been such as to secure the approval of the Magistrates; and the natural result has been to increase, in comparison with previous years, the proportion of convictions out of the number of charges preferred.

The number of apprehensions for drunkenness, including parties found drunk and disorderly, and drunk and incapable of taking care of themselves is 4156; (being 42 less than the previous year) and from the persons of this class the sum of £1392 10s 10d has been taken, and restored when discharged from custody.

The return also shews that out of a gross amount of £7658 6s 11d reported to have been stolen within the Borough during the year, the sum of £3040 14s 3d has been recovered by the Police, and that out of a sum amounting to £1801 8s 1d reported to have been accidentally lost by the Public, the Police have been instrumental in recovering £1126 6s 3d

It will not be necessary to comment on the information contained in each table, but it may be desirable to draw the attention of the Committee to several new tables containing information not given in the returns for the past yaer.

Table numbered 23 gives an account of the trades or occupation of the parties who have been apprehended: classed according to the various offences which they have committed, or with which they have been charged.

Table numbered 18 shows the difference between the number of of apprehensions and the actual number of persons who have been in custody during 8 months from the 1st May to the 31st day of December 1844; and also shews the number of times that the same individuals have been taken into custody on distinct and separate charges.

Table numbered 22 shows the number of robberies that have taken place on Sundays in dwelling house and other premises during the absence of the owners or persons in charge, and the amount or value of the property reported to have been stolen.

There are also several other tables which show the number of prisoners that have been apprehended by the Police Officers of each Division receptively, and how they have been disposed of , and also the country of which the prisoners who have been apprehended are said to have been natives.

The miscellaneous returns comprise several tables giving information on matters not included in the last years returns. On a reference to some of these tables it will be seen that whilst the Police have been both vigilant and effective, they have exercised their powers with great judgement and discretion.

The returns relating to fires shows that out of 127 fires which have taken place during the year, without including any cases of chimneys on fire, 59 have been extinguished by the Police and inhabitants without the aid of the Engines or Firemen, 10 by the Police and Firemen without the aid of the Engines, 21 by the Firemen with the aid of the Engines, and 37 by the owners of property and their assistants only.

The returns relating to the Nuisance Offences noticed by the Police whilst engaged in their ordinary duties, it being remembered that there are Officers belonging to another Department specially engaged tin this service, shows (without including the reports of dirty streets and obstructions of footways by encroachments) that out of 2573 cases so summoned, only 13 charges have not been proved.

It will also be seen by a reference to the return of reports against Public Houses and Beer Houses, that out of 210 reports against Publicans only 12 have escaped penalties; and that out of 341 reports against Beer Retailers, only 16 charges have not been proved.

The returns last referred to clearly prove that the Police have not acted arbitrarily, or brought before the Magistrates frivolous or vexatious charges, and that this has been the case is confirmed by the fact, that in only two instances has a complaint been made against the Police for acting harshly or improperly by Publicans or Beer retailers; and in both instances the complaints made were brought before the Committee and completely disproved.

The only other table which it may be necessary to notice is that numbered 21 which shows that during the past year 2798 premises have been found open and insecure by the Police during the night. Of this number 1433 consisted of warehouses and shops containing property, in which no parties resided or were left in charge; 649 of houses, shops and warehouses in which parties did reside, and 538 of empty and uninhabited houses. In all the above cases notices were sent the the proprietors of the state in their premises were found by the Police.

The same table shows that the Police have during the past year restored to their friends 2637 young children, found wandering and apparently lost, in the streets.

In concluding this report, the Chief Constable is happy in being able to state that the Borough is in a most peaceable, quiet and orderly state; and that the Police are performing their duties both quietly and vigilantly and in a manner highly satisfactory.

Edward Willis ,

Chief Constable


Memorandum

The following letter to Captain Willis was read out:

March 13th 1845


Sir,

In consequence of the very strong remarks made by the Chairman of the Watch Committee on Thursday last in reference to my conduct in connection with the Inquest on Jacob Warburton, without giving me an opportunity of disproving them (except the charge preferred by Gifford, which charge was dismissed) I feel that I can no longer hold office under you with safety to myself and character: and beg therefore to tender you my resignation as a Police Constable and Coroner's Officer

I have the honour to remain

Sir, your obedient servant,

Isaac Phillipson


Resolved

That the resignation tendered in the note addressed to the Chief Constable by Isaac Phillipson not be received

Memorandum

That Isaac Phillipson was called before the Committee, and was informed that the Committee considered his letter exceedingly improper, involving a serious charge against the Committee; but before coming to a decision in relation thereto, the Committee wished him to have an opportunity of offering any explanation; whereupon Phillipson not only adhered to the statements contained in his letter to the chief Constable , but also made many other statements as to what occurred when he was before the Committee, equally untrue: and stated that he had nothing further to add, but left the Committee to do what they pleased, as he only wished to be released from their service.

Resolved

That considering the false statements contained in the letter addressed by Isaac Phillipson to the Chief Constable, as well as the disrespectful tone of such communication, and that which statements upon having an opportunity to explain he has this day reiterated, and added many additional statements as to what occurred when he was before the Committee, equally untrue, this Committee can no longer have confidence in him as an Officer of the Police : and that he be therefore dismissed from the Force

That a copy of this minute be transmitted to the Coroner of the Borough.

The above was reported in the local newspapers.

Isaac Phillipson was not over impressed with this decision and had the following letter printed in the Manchester Guardian dated 2nd April 1845, which although it appeared in the Correspondence Column, the header was "Advertisement".

To the Editor of the Manchester Guardian

Sir - My conduct in connection with the case of Jacob Warburton being brought prominently before the public in the proceedings of the Watch Committee, report in your number dated 26th instant, and the circumstances not being there fully or correctly stated, I request, as an act of justice to me, to lay the following facts before the public:-

On the morning of 24th February, on calling at the Infirmary, I was informed of the death of Warburton, and saw the witness Mills and his wife, who told me of the nature of the case. I then went to the town Hall, and repeated what they had told me to captain Willis, who requested me to see Superintendent Leary. As I was going from Captain Willis's office, I meat Leary and gave him the same information I had given to Captain Willis; and he said he would inquire into the matter among his men, and take a report of all who knew anything of the case, and directed me to see him again after two o'clock on that same day. I then returned to the coroner's office, and reported the case in the usual way, by entering it into a book kept for the purpose, and the inquest was fixed by the coroner for eleven o'clock the following morning - I then went on another case; and, on my way, called at the warehouse of Mr George Wright , in Mason-street, to see witness Mills, and to tell him when the inquest was to be held.

Mr Wright told me that a young man, whose name he did not know, was present when the deceased was taken up [arrested], and being sober, would be an imported witness. Mr Wright then direct Mills to find the man and take him to the coroner's office, if he succeeded in doing so. On my arrival at the coroner's office after dinner, I found Mills and the young man  before referred to the witness Fox, and they were then duly summoned to to attend the inquest. I then went to the Oldham Road lockups, and saw Superintendent Leary and told him when the inquest would be held; and he promised the evidence he had should be ready. All the witnesses, and Superintendent Leary with his men, six or seven in number, being in attendance at the inquest, the case was then out of my hands, and I never interfered in it further.

The witnesses I summoned were Mills, his wife and Fox; Mills was a companion of the deceased. Mrs Mills states, on oath, that she had not been form her house that evening, and not [taken] drink of any kind that day; was waiting for her husband at the door; and, when she saw them coming along the street, she went to them; the Police then interfered, and she escaped. Fox states on oath, that as he was returning home quite sober, he met deceased and his companions in he street, and out of kindness assisted deceased to his own house, when the Police interfered and took him with the others to the lockup,, and kept him all night. Deceased and his companions were quite strangers to him.

These being the facts of the case, and I am fully prepared to establish them, it is for the public to say whether the Watch Committee are justified in passing a resolution to the effect as stated in the Guardian:- "That Isaac Phillipson, the coroner's officer, in obtaining only in the above case the evidence of the drunken companions of the deceased, was in the highest degree reprehensible, that his conduct was calculated to seriously interfere with (as it did in fact) and defeat the ends of justice; in consequence of which, the coroner was grossly deceived as to the nature of the facts, and was therefore induced in his opening statement to create a prejudice in the minds of the Jury against innocent parties, which might have led to more serious consequences."

As to the coroner being grossly deceived, and the minds of the Jury being prejudiced, as stated by the Watch Committee, I can only say that they had no information from  me, or otherwise (so far as I know), than from the witnesses at the inquest. Having , as I consider, clearly shown that the charge of the Watch Committee is unfounded, I do not consider it necessary to refer to the manner of my dismissal the Police Force, further than to deny having made any statement to Captain Willis or to the Watch Committee, which is "untrue" or "false", and I respectfully tendered my resignation to the Watch Committee, in consequence of the remarks upon my supposed conduct at the meeting of the 6th instant, and which are embodied in the resolution of the 13th instant, and which I feel uncalled for and unjust, and such as a man innocent of the charge, and of honest feeling and intention, could no submit - I am Sir, your obedient servant, Isaac Phillipson. Manchester, March 31st 1845.

The following letter appeared in the Guardian dated 9th April 1845 under the heading; THE LATE DEATH IN THE LOCK-UP.

To the Editor of THE MANCHESTER GUARDIAN - Sir will you be kind enough to favour us with as small space in your paper in reply to the report of the watch committee relative to the inquest held into the case of Jacob Warburton? ROBERT ROBINSON, Foreman of the Jury, Manchester, March 17th 1845.

We, the Jury who presided at the inquest concerning the death of Jacob Warburton, having read, with much surprise, in the Guardian of yesterday, the extraordinary report of the watch committee in reference to this case, and we cannot come to any conclusion from reading such report, but that the watch committee have grounded it on the statements of the police alone, without reference to the evidence produced before the coroner; and we are the more surprised at this, because the town-clerk, Captain Willis and one of two of the watch committee, were present at the adjourned inquest, when the whole of the evidence taken on the previous day was read over by the coroner.

 It appears from their report "that the Coroner's Officer in obtaining only, in the above case,  the evidence of the drunken companions of the deceased,  was in the highest degree reprehensible, and calculated (as appears to have been the fact) seriously to interfere with, if not to defeat the needs of Justice,  the Coroner was grossly deceived as to the facts and was thereby induced in the opening statement of the nature of this case to the Jury, to create prejudiced against innocent parties not easily removed, which was entirely unsupported by the evidence which was either taken or offered , and which might have lead to most serious consequences." 

The coroner may have been grossly deceived. we leave that part of the report to himself; but as to him, in his opening statement, creating, or attempting to create, a prejudice in the minds of the Jury against innocent parties, and uttering a syllable that was not afterwards substantiated by evidence, is utterly untrue, as is also the statement, that the conduct of the coroner's office was calculated to defeat the ends of justice. The inquest was adjourned for the purpose of obtaining additional evidence. Inspectors Leary and Pierce were present at the adjournment, and were requested, as well as the coroner's officer, to exert themselves, and procure what additional evidence they could.

It resulted in their producing the Police - the very parties implicated in the transaction; and whose evidence, we are sorry to say, was of a very doubtful and unsatisfactory nature. so well were we satisfied that certain remarks, of a similar nature to those of the report, made by the town-clerk at the adjourned inquest, had no foundation in truth, that, before we separated, we passed a resolution, which was then read to the coroner, of which the following is a copy: - "We, the Jury, sitting over the body of Jacob Warburton, cannot separate without expressing our approbation of the very patient and impartial manner in which you have conducted this inquiry, and we cannot too highly deprecate the unwarrantable language used by the town-clerk, reflecting on your public conduct in this particular case." This was the unanimous opinion of the Jury. Now, we deny that the facts of the case warrant the strong measure that have been adopted by the watch committee against the corner's officer. In this opinion we are justified by the police not being able to obtain any better evidence than that which he produced; and, until now, we were not aware that one of the functions of the watch committee was to censure the conduct of coroners' Juries; for censure is implied in this report. We all due deference to  the concentration of wisdom which may in that very useful body,  we cannot concede to them the small stock of discrimination we possess, and which led us, after hearing all the evidence that could be obtained, unbiased, and without a feeling in the matter beyond that of a pure wish to do justice, to come to the verdict we have recorded. (signed by the Jury) ROBERT ROPBINSON, WILLIAM COCKING, THOS. HIGGINS,  ROBERT WATSON, JAMES WOOD, HENRY ADAMS, JOHN WILKINSON, THOS. DORAN, JOHN NEWTON, JOHN PARKINSON, JONATHAN HOWSON, JOHN HANBY.

 

(We have been compelled by the numerous other demands on our space, several times to withdraw the above letter after it was in type. We give insertion to it as is signed by all the Jurors; but in our opinion of the circumstances, which is adverse to that of the Jury, is not at all shaken by their statement. - Editor, Guardian.)


Meeting 26
th March 1845

Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the proceedings of the Nuisance Committee on the 24th March was was read:

That the sub committee appointed on the 16th December last be requested to confer with the Watch Committee for the purposes of obtaining their approval and sanction of the arrangements proposed in the report this day approved of, and adopted, and to secure the co-operation of the Police Officers so far as the same is required for carrying out such arrangements, and that a copy be transmitted to the Watch Committee.

Memorandum

A copy of the report referred to in the resolution of the Nuisance Committee was submitted and read.

Resolved

That the Chairman and deputy Chairman be requested to confer with the Deputation appointed by the Nuisance Committee on the arrangements proposed in the report now read as concerns the Police: and that they be authorised and empowered if they think fit in order to prevent delay in the necessary operations of that Committee, to sanction such arrangements and give such directions as they may think desirable: reporting this to the Committee.


Meeting 3rd April 1845

Resolved

That James Shaw, having for some time acted as Senior Clerk in the Detective Office in the place of John Pixton resigned, and to the satisfaction of the Chief Constable , be hereafter allowed the full wages of 20/- per week.

Memorandum

The Chief Constable having reported that the second pair of trousers allowed to the Police Officers under the regulations of the Force were now due and also much required by the Police.

Resolved

That the Clothing Sub Committee be authorised to procure trousers for the whole Force ;and to order the cloth necessary for that purpose.

Memorandum

The Chief Constable having reported that a great Nuisance existed at the Oldham Road Station from the accumulation of manure in the yard behind the Station which was used as a place of deposit by the Road and Street Cleaning Company.

Resolved

That a copy of the report of the Chief Constable be transmitted to the Lamp and Scavenging committee: and that they be requested if they have the power, to direct that the Nuisance complained of shall be abated.


Meeting 10th April 1845

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

Timothy Moran William Simpson
William Smith Joseph Goodwin
Richard Wilmot  

 


Memorandum

The following report was read:

The undersigned having been deputed and authorised to act on behalf of the Watch Committee report:

That they so far as the Police are concerned approved of the plan proposed in the joint report of the Nuisance and Licensing and Hackney Coach Committees for the detection and suppression of Nuisances and other offences throughout the Borough, subject to the following additional stipulations, which are however supposed to be really involved in the report of the said Committees.

That the Superintendent of Nuisances be required to give any nuisance Officer whose attendance he may as authorised call for, on such officer being dismissed, a card or note stating the time when such Officer came , as also the time when he was dismissed: in order that the Superintendent of Police may ascertain that such Officer attended upon the Superintendent [of Nuisances] and also returned to his duties within the Division without loss of time.

That on occasions of day or evening meetings or public assemblages, the Nuisance Officers attend only when, and in such numbers as shall be required by the Chief Constable or the Officer of the Police in charge: such request to be sent in writing to the Superintendent of Nuisances, whose duty it shall be to direct which of the Nuisance Officers shall attend , and to send to the office of the Chief Constable, in writing, the names of the Officers ordered to be present .

The undersigned have authorised to do what is necessary to carry the plan into operation so soon as the Committees are prepared to act

Signed

William Neild

P F Wilert

Henry Lees

SUPERANNUATION FUND

Resolved

That every member of the Police Force be required to contribute annually towards the “Manchester Police Relief Fund” an amount which shall be equal to £1 percent upon the amount of his salary or pay , or as near thereto as may be, and as shown in the following table:


Monthly Salaries
The Chief Constable 8/4 per month
The Chief Superintendent 5/10 per month
1 Superintendent @ £200 per annum 3/4 per month
1 Superintendent @ £180 per annum 3/- per month
2 Superintendents @ £150 per annum 2/6 per month
Clerks @ £ 100 1/8 per month


 Weekly Salaries

Inspectors @ 38/6 per week 5d per week
Inspectors @ 30/- per week 4d per week
Sub Inspectors @ 25/- per week 3d per week
Coroner's Officer @ 24/- per week 3d per week
Constables @ 18/- and 17/- per week 2d per week
All other Officers not exceeding pay of 21/- per week 2d per week


That such contributions be deducted from the weekly or monthly pay, as the case may require, of every member of the Force: and that the same be paid and made payable from the 15th day of April 1845.

That in all cases where any member of the Force shall receive portions only of a week's or a month's salary, the full weekly or monthly contribution towards the Fund shall be deducted.

That it is desirable that in pursuance of any power given in that behalf, either by the Borough Police Act, or the Municipal Act, all moneys received for the service of Summonses and Warrants by the Police , from the sale of old Police clothing, unclaimed and stolen property recovered by the Police and forfeited, also the amount accruing from fines imposed for assaults on Police Constables, together with such other sums as it may be lawful for the Council or the Committee to pay or direct to be paid in aid of the said relief fund, shall be so applied and paid.

That the amounts from time to time deducted from the salaries of the Police in accordance with the resolutions now agreed to, and also all other amounts paid or received in pursuance of any order or resolution of the Council or of the Watch Committee in aid of the said fund shall be paid by and in the name of the Chief Constable into the Bank of [Sir Benjamin Heywood] Bart. + Co to the credit of an account to be entitled “The Manchester Police Relief Fund Account.”

That the following regulations be, and the same are hereby approved of and adopted for the purpose of guiding the Watch Committee for the time being, in granting annuities or allowances out of or from the Relief Fund, subject however to such modifications and alterations as the Committee for the time being may think the particular circumstances of each case requires.

That every member of the Force who shall have served with diligence and fidelity upwards of twenty years , and who shall from infirmity of mind or body have become unable to discharge the duties of his Office, shall be eligible to be placced on the Superannuation List with an annual allowance from the said Fund of such some not being more than two thirds of his pay, as the Watch Committee for the time being, may determine.

That a gratuity may be granted out of the said fund to any member of the Force who may be worn out after diligent and faithful service of less than fifteen years , but upwards of eight years in the proportion of one month's full pay for every years service, or or such other sum, not exceeding that amount, as the Watch Committee for the time being may think expedient to grant.

That every member of the Force who shall be disabled by bodily injuries received in the execution of his duty shall be eligible to be placed on the Superannuated List with an annual allowance from the said Fund of such sum not exceeding three fourths of his pay, as the Watch Committee for the time being, may consider the circumstances of the case require.

That in the event of any member of the Force being killed or dying from the effects of wounds received in the execution of his duty, his widow if any, or family in case his wife be dead leaving a family, then the children, so long as the widow remains unmarried, and continues respectable in her conduct, or in case the be dead leaving a family, then the children, so long as the Committee may determine, such annual sum not exceeding three fourths of the pay of the deceased as the Committee for the time being may determine.

That the length of service shall be calculated from the time that any member of the Force first entered into the Police either under the authorities of the Borough, or any of the Townships within the Borough, provided that he has without any interruption continued a member of the Police Force, either of the Townships of the Borough.

That the Committee may if they think fit allow the time to be calculated from the from the first instance, although the party may have been for a time out of the Force, in case such party resigned with honour, and was on that account on application re-admitted into the service, deducting in such case the time during which such party may have been absent.

That nothing herein contained shall be constructed absolutely to entitle any member of the force to any Superannuation allowance , or to prevent him from being dismissed without Superannuation allowance , or to prevent the withdrawal of any pension or allowance which may have been granted in the event of the party receiving the same committing any act of a discreditable or unlawful character, or of any other circumstance arising which may induce the Committee to determine to withdraw the same.

 

Meeting 17th April 1845

Memorandum

The following extract was read from the minutes of the proceedings of the Ardwick Committee on the 7th April.

That the Watch Committee be requested to instruct the Police officers on duty within this Township to report to this Committee the street which are not sufficiently cleansed by the Road and Street Cleansing Company, and also any alterations of buildings and encroachments into the streets.

Also the following extract from the minutes of the proceedings of the Chorlton upon Medlock Committee was read:

That the Watch Committee be requested to instruct the Police officers on duty within this Township to report to this Committee the street which are not sufficiently cleansed by the Road and Street Cleansing Company, and also any alterations of buildings and encroachments into the streets.

Resolved

That the Chief Constable be instructed to comply with the request of the Committees acting for the Township of Ardwick and Chorlton upon Medlock as stated in the above extracts.

Resolved

That sub Inspector John Cahill is hereby appointed Inspector at the wage of 30/- per week in the place of Mr Leary promoted to the rank of Superintendent.

Resolved

That Police Constable C.79 Matthew Buckley is hereby appointed sub Inspector at the wage of 25/- per week in place of Slater reduced.

Resolved

That Police Constable A.39 Henry Keenan is hereby appointed sub Inspector at the wage of 25/- per week in place of Emery dismissed.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

William Chorlton James Gratrix
John Gratrix Thomas Riley
Edward Robinson James Lunt
John Graham 


Meeting 1st May 1845

Resolved

That William Dean having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed a Constable of the Borough.

Oldham Road Station

Memorandum

Extract from the minutes of the Lamp and Scavenging Committee's proceedings:

That the report from the Oldham Road Lock-up sub Committee be read:

We beg to report that on Thursday the 17th we inspected the Scavenging Yard behind the Station in Oldham Road, complained of as being a Nuisance and causing an offensive smell to the Lock-ups. We are of the opinion that the Nuisance is caused in a increase from the effluvia arising from the street sweeping being placed close against the building and being permitted to remain too long in the yard; but principally from the confined state of the cells, and more particularly the water closets in the cells, and in the lock-up house. We also think that the above Nuisance cannot be effectually remedied while the Scavenging Yard remains in its present situation: and recommend that with the convenience of the Road and Street Cleaning Company, the yard be given up to the Watch committee, on condition of their furnishing an equal quantity of land in a convenient and detached situation in the same neighbourhood as a depot for street sweeping &c.


Meeting 8th May 1845


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be authorised to procure a sufficient number of stretchers or boards for the accommodation of persons brought to the station house incapable of taking care of themselves.

That the Chief Constable be also authorised to procure seven canvas hand-bearers for conveying incapables* to the various lock-ups.


Resolved

That the limit of the age of candidates for admission to the Force be now fixed at 36 years instead of 40 years as heretofore.

[*Incapables being those people who were drunk and incapable of looking after themselves. This resolution was the direct result of the death in custody of Jacob Warburton]. Newspaper report.

Meeting 22nd May 1845

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

John Edge William Webster
Thomas Bainbridge John Hulme
John Hesketh Francis Ogden
William ArdernJohn Cash
Thomas Evans John Evans
John Windsor 


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Meeting 5th June 1845

Resolved

That Police Constable William Hewitt, having discharged the duty of Coroner's Officer for some time, to the satisfaction of the Chief Constable and the Coroner, is hereby appointed to that office at the wage of 21/- per week.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before this Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

Benjamin Cooper John Scott
Charles Ellis Richard [Batkin]
Charles S Evans Joseph Hampson
Joseph Platt 


Meeting 5th June 1845

Appointment of Nuisance Inspector

The following extract from the minutes of the Nuisance Committee's proceedings was read:

That the Watch Committee be requested to recommend a Police Constable for appointment to the situation of Nuisance Inspector now vacant. That in all future appointments of Nuisance Inspectors the wages be fixed at 25/- per week with clothing.

Resolved

That the Chief Constable be authorised and requested to select one of the Police Force as a candidate for the situation referred to above, and to place the party so selected at once upon duty: and that the Nuisance Committee be informed by the Chief Constable of the name of the party selected by him as a candidate for the appointment.

 

Meeting 19th June 1845

Chief Constable's Estimate and Report

In preparing for the approval of the Committee the estimate of the probable amount of money which will be required for the maintenance of the Police for the ensuing year, the Chief Constable has, in accordance with the request of the Chairman of the Watch Committee, and in conjunction with the Superintendents made a careful revision of of the state of the Borough as regards Police protection. The Chief Constable finds several of the beats unusually extensive in districts where buildings and population have considerably increased since the apportionment of the Constables on the resumption of the control of the Force by the Committee; and further,- that great inconvenience is at present daily experienced both by the Superintendents as well as the public in each Division, from the unavoidable withdrawal of a certain number of the day duty Constables from their Beats in the streets to the Borough Court House. During their absence , offences against the local Acts, and otherwise, frequently occur, which are noticed and afterwards complained of by the public, but of which the Police have had no opportunity of taking cognizance.

In order to rectify in the first place the inconvenience arising from the too

extended size of some of the Beats, particularly on the C Division and also to afford Police Superintendence to neighbourhoods where both population and buildings have materially increased, the Chief Constable has made provision in the estimate for an increase of 12 Constables to the strength of the Police Force from the first day of October next ensuing, and which Constables he proposes to apportion equally between C and D Divisions as hereinafter specified; and in order to remedy the inconvenience arising from the absence of the day duty Constables from their Beats either on account of sickness or when obliged to attend the Court (at which time many streets are wholly left without Police assistance) provision has been in the estimate for an addition of four supernumeraries to the A Division and of two supernumeraries to each of the B C and D Divisions, to be employed on the same terms as the supernumeraries now acting under the Watch Committee, and upon the plan proposed in the subsequent part of this report.

The Chief Constable , feeling confident from the excellent conduct of the Constables that he shall be enabled before too long to recommend a certain number for promotion, has also made provision for an increase of the Merit Class.

In the C division it is proposed to place the six additional Constables on the night duty relief, and to divide some of the Beats, which are at present too extensive to give proper protection to the inhabitants, and to place a Patrol upon the Hyde Road, as in this neighbourhood several attempts at robbery with violence have occurred during the time that the Constables on the adjoining Beats have been on other portions of their rounds.

The Beats which it is proposed to divide are numbers 13, 15, 16, 18 and 40 which will take five men including the Patrol for the Hyde Road , who will be obtained by the division of No 16 Beat : for the sixth man it is proposed to make a new Beat out or portions of Nos 23, 28 and 29 Beats where they join each other near the Birmingham Railway Station [This refers to London Road later Piccadilly Station].

No 13 beat comprises a portion of Victoria Park, Plymouth Grove, Upper Brook Street, and the Stockport road, and takes the Constable upwards of three hours to work on the double. Nos 15, 16, 18 and 40 beats average each 84 minutes to work, and Nos 23, 28, and 290 average 67 minutes each.

By the proposed arrangement the average time for working the Beats named will be much reduced, but none be made too small, as the time required for working the shortest beat will be 41 minutes.

In the D Division it is proposed to place the six additional new men on the day duty reliefs, as a large class of the offences which take place are committed by vagrants, hawkers, and other idle persons who resort to this district during the day, (which is very much increased in buildings and population) under the pretence of selling goods.

The number of new dwelling houses and shops which were built in the Division between 1st January1843 and the end of December 1844 amounted to 1,015 and there are at the present time in the course of erection and in a great state of forwardness 427 new dwelling houses, besides 100 more of which the foundations are laid, and which will no doubt be inhabited prior to the winter.

Most of these new buildings are situated on either side of the Stretford New Road, it is therefore proposed to distribute the men according to the plan laid down on the map now submitted with this report which is as following:

To divide the Stretford new Road and make a new Beat marked 17.

One in York St and Radnor St marked as 20.

One in Leaf St and Vine St as marked 15.

One Lloyd St to Moss Lane and side streets as marked 4.

One in George St leading to Oxford Road by the mills as marked 11.

And an additional man on the Oxford Road as marked 7.

As respect to the supernumeraries which is proposed to add to each Division in order to keep the Beats complete during the day, (which it is extremely important now that the Police are called upon to look after carts and other obstructions, as also all offences against the Local Acts) the following arrangement is recommended by which the Court will be supplied with the requisite number of Constables, and the Beats during the day properly attended to throughout the borough.

It is proposed that the additional Supernumeraries allowed to the Divisions shall attend at the Stations with the night duty relief so that the Supernumeraries may complete all the night beats which they are now unable to do in consequence of the three supernumeraries at present allowed to them not being sufficient to meet the casualties which occur, and that arrangements shall be made for relieving one of the regular Constables about 2 o'clock in the morning by dividing his beat amongst the Constables having the adjoining Beats.

The constable so relieved to be in attendance at the Office the next morning at nine o'clock in order to take duty at the Court: thus the Court will be provided with four Officers specially appointed for the duty required: one for the Magistrate's entrance to the Court; one for the entrance for the public and for keeping the footway clear; and two for the interior of the Court Room.

As the duties of the Court do not average more than three hours and a half, this arrangement will not impose on the Constable so employed any extra time or duty, but on an average less than the ordinary time; and in order to make it fair to all the men, a different Constable can be selected for the duty every other night or week as may be thought most advisable.

By this plan arrangement can also be made by the Superintendents to fill up the Beats of the day Constables who may have cases to be heard at Court the next day: for instance, some small Beat may at 2 o'clock in the morning be amalgamated with those adjoining it; and the Constable who is relieved my be placed on duty the next day during the time the day Constable is absent from his Beat to attend with his case at the Court.

The plan has also the advantage of enabling the Superintendents to place men on the streets during the day who have uniform, and who are accustomed to Police duties, which is important.


Edward Willis

Chief Constable


An Extract from the Probable Estimate of money which will be required to cover the expense of the Constabulary Force from 1st May 1845 to 1st May 1846

 

1 x Chief Constable per annum £550 0s 0d
1 x Chief Superintendent per annum £350 0s 0d
1 x Superintendent per annum £200 0s 0d
1 x Superintendent per annum£180 0s 0d
2 x Superintendents @ £150 per annum£300 0s 0d
2 x Inspectors @ £100 per annum £200 0s 0d
18 Inspectors @ £78 per annum or 30/- per week£1404 0s 0d
37 Sub-Inspectors @ £65 per annum or 25/- per week£2405 0s 0d
64 x Merit Class Constables at 18/- per week£2995 4s 0d
267 x Constables @ 17/- per week £11801 8s 0d
1 x Clerk @ £100 per annum£100 0s 0d
1 x Store Keeper @ £ 100 per annum £100 0s 0d
2 x Clerks @ £52 per annum£100 0s 0d
1 x Clerk at 18/- per week£ 46 16s 0d
1 x Coroner's Officer @ 21/- per week£ 54 12s 0d
1 x messenger @ 21/- per week£ 54 12s 0d
12 x Supernumeraries @ 17/- per week then deduct one third£353 12s 0d


Meeting 3rd July 1845

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

John Burke John Bennett
John Haslam Samuel Anderson
James Wilton George Nelson
Samuel Riley 

 

Resolved

That the deputy Chairman and the Chief Constable be deputed to dispose of the Police Vans.


Meeting 10th July 1845

Resolved

That Joseph Phillips having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed a Constable of the Borough.

 

Meeting 24th July 1845

Resolved

That the following parties appeared before the Committee and are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

William Marsden Henry Ede
George Snell Samuel Cartwright
John Turton William Hickson
Joshua BarnsleySamuel Holmes
William LathamJohn Reynolds


Meeting 7th August 1845

Memorandum

The Chief Constable having reported that the Fairfield Street, Kirby Street, Chorlton upon Medlock Stations require painting and decorating, and the latter station requires some repairs and alterations.

Resolved

That Charles Harrison having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed as a Constable of the Borough.

Memorandum

The following communication was read:

Shrewsbury 4th August 1845

Right Worshipful Sir,

As the organ of the Watch Committee of this Borough I have been requested to forward to you the enclosed resolution, which I have great pleasure in doing: and at the same time permit me to add, that I do so with the greatest respect.

R B Blakenmore

Shrewsbury July 30th 1845

To the Right Worshipful

The Mayor of Manchester


At a meeting of the Watch Committee held at the Guildhall this day it was amongst other things unanimously resolved:

That the thanks of this Committee be given to the authorities of Manchester for their liberal quiescence in the request of the Corporate Body of this Borough for the aid of a portion of their Police Force during the late proceedings of the Royal Agricultural Society of England : and beg at same time to express their high opinion of the character of the detachment of the Police thus deputed consisting of Inspectors McMullen and Maybury*, and to acknowledge the very efficient services which they rendered; and that Mr Blakenmore be respectfully requested to forward a copy of the above resolution to Manchester.


Meeting 14th August 1845


POLICE RELIEF FUND

Memorandum

The following report was read:

The Town Clerk reports that the Watch Committee are in his opinion fully authorised and empowered if they think proper, to order that any sums arising from the following sources should be paid over to the credit of the “Manchester Police Relief Fund”:

for service of Licence Notices on Publicans

for service of Summonses and Warrants

from the sale of old Police Clothing

from interest on conditions of service money

for moieties, and other portions of penalties payable to informer where information is given to the Police.

The Council have power given to them by the 196th Section of the Police Act, to order any moneys arising from the following sources to be paid to the credit of such fund, and have not as yet delegated that power to the Watch Committee:

fines imposed for assaults on Constables

proceeds of unclaimed stolen goods.

The Town Clerk does not find any power given either to the Committee or the Council to order fines imposed for drunkenness to be paid to the credit of this fund.

Joseph Hewitt

Town Clerk Aug 13th 1845


Resolved

That the funds now in the hands of Chief Constable, or hereafter arising from the following sources be paid to the credit of “The Manchester Police Relief Fund”:

for service of Licence Notices on Publicans

for service of Summonses and Warrants

from the sale of old Police Clothing

from interest on conditions of service money

for moieties, and other portions of penalties payable to informer when information is given to the Police.


Resolved

That it be recommended to the Council to authorise this Committee to order if it appears desirable, all sums hereafter arising from the following sources:

fines imposed for assaults on Constables

proceeds arising from the sale of unclaimed stolen goods.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of this Borough; John Whitehouse and George Lyle


Meeting 21st August 1845

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: Thomas Frost, William Garland and John Titterton.

Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the Nuisance Committee proceedings of the 20th August was read:

That the Watch Committee be requested to inform this Committee whether Mr Golland Surgeon to the Police can be required to attend the Nuisance Inspectors (they being Constables of the Borough) during sickness, free of charge to this Committee.

Resolved

That the Nuisance Committee be informed that the agreement with Mr Golland applies only to his attendance upon the members of the Police Force, and that this Committee do not consider that the remuneration paid includes attendance upon any other parties than the members of the Police Force, although such parties may for convenience be sworn in as a Police Constable.

Resolved

That a copy of the correspondence which has taken place between the Chief Constable and the Town Clerk and the Chief Constable of the Staffordshire Police Force in reference to the character of John Dixon be transmitted by the Town Clerk to the Secretary of State for the Home Department.

Memorandum

A memorial from a number of resident inhabitants of Collyhurst adjoining the Township of Harpurhey, [requesting] for the establishment of a Lock-up in that vicinity was read.


Meeting 28th August 1845

Memorandum

The following letter was read

Whitehall

25th August 1845

Sir,

I am directed by the Secretary Sir James Graham to acknowledge receipt of your letter of the 21st instant relative to the refusal of the Chief Constable of of the County of Stafford to answer certain pointed questions touching the character of a candidate for employment in the Manchester Borough Police Force, and I am to inform you that the Magistracy of the County have the general control of the Constabulary and that the Secretary of State cannot interfere in this matter.

Resolved

That the Town Clerk be requested to transmit to the Magistrates of the County of Stafford a copy of the correspondence which has taken place between the Chief Constable and Town Clerk and the Chief Constable of the Staffordshire Constabulary Force in reference to the character of John Dixon.

Resolved

That the following parties have appeared before the Committee and are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: Jabez Gibson, Benjamin Barker and John Gee.


Meeting 4th September 1845


POLICE RELIEF FUND

Memorandum

Extract from the minutes of the Council's proceedings on the 3rd instant was read:

That the Treasurer of the Borough be and is hereby authorised and directed to pay over under the direction of the Watch Committee to the credit of the “Manchester Police Relief Fund” all sums hereafter arising and received from fines imposed for assaults on Constables and from the sale of unclaimed stolen property.


Meeting 11th September 1845


Resolved

That Sub-Inspector L O'Neil having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Inspector in the B Division at the wage of 30/- per week.

Resolved

That the following Police Constables appeared before the Committee and are hereby appointed Sub-Inspectors at the wages of 25/- per week:

Thomas Hill, William Taylor and Joshua Brown – B Division

Luke Ryan – C Division

Samuel Lightfoot – D Division

Resolved

that the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

John Smith Henry Hargreaves
George Burrows John Buckley
James Adcock William [Pincock]
F W GrahamAbraham Soulby



Meeting 25th September 1845

Resolved

That Police Constable A 41 Henry Murphy having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Sub-Inspector in the A Division at the wages of 25/- per week.


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: John Dixon and John Muxham.


Meeting 9th October 1845

Resolved

That the following Police Constables having appeared before the committee are hereby in accordance with the recommendation of the Chief Constable promoted to the Merit Class at the wages of 18/- per week


A DIVISION

 

4 Edward Longworth 47 Michael Quinn
8 John Austin 56 William Allcock
9 James Sexton 58 William Chawkley
13 Henry Lovatt 59John Appleton
18 James Cahill 72Thomas Fazackerly
32 John Ferguson   



B DIVISION

 

11 George Coats 22 John Fry
29 John Barker 72 David Barber
9 William Wrigley 13 Theopolis Howell
26 James Schofield 72Charles S Evans
19 William Kirk 48John Healey
28 John Dewsnup   



C DIVISION

 

80 John Davis 38 Adam Hunter
34 Richard Johnson 67 John Yates
5 Richard Huxley 73 William Sullivan
42 Henry Duckworth 3William Burgess
75 John Dollagan 25John Fowler
24 Martin Justin 52Matthew Knox




D DIVISION

 

1 John Ollier 59 John Johnson
8 James Critchlow 60 John Lee
9 William Riley 54 John Houghton
25 James Thorley 26John Hayes
40 Samuel R Ludlow 36Samuel Gilhooly
57 Joseph Johnson 64Patrick Nolan



E DIVISION

 

2 James Haslam 5 James Bowes
6 Robinson Lowcock    



Memorandum

Resolution from Guardians of Manchester Union

That application be made to the Watch Committee of the Council of the Borough of Manchester requesting permission for Peter McHugh , Vagrant Officer of the Manchester Union to be sworn in as a Constable for the Borough.

Resolved

Peter McHugh, Vagrant Officer appeared before the Committee and was sworn to act as a Constable of the Borough in accordance with the request of the Board of Guardians.

Resolved

That John Mills having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed a Constable of the Borough.

 


Meeting 16th October 1845

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: William Henry Gill, Joseph Garland and Joseph Allen.


Meeting 23rd Oct 1845

Resolved

That John Maycock having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed a Constable of the Borough.


Meeting 30th October 1845

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the committee are hereby appointed Constables of this Borough:

 

Edward Haycock John Vernon
James Eyre Thomas Flanagan
James Murray Thomas Boddy
John EllesJames Gregory
Samuel Hilton 


Meeting 6th November 1845

Resolved that the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed constables of this Borough:

 

Thomas Prescott John Fulford
Thomas Parker William Done
Edward Fieldhouse Samuel Batkin
John Suttcliffe 


Meeting 20th November 1845

Resolved

That Patrick Broderick having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Constable of the Borough.


Meeting 27th November 1845

Memorandum

Extract form the minutes of the Nuisance Committee Proceedings of 19th November:

The undersigned having conferred with the Town Clerk upon the subject of the memorial as to Sunday Trading recommend, without expressing an opinion as to the necessity of taking steps to abolish the practice, that the memorial be transmitted to the Watch Committee being of the opinion that the practice does not constitute one of those cases of nuisances which are intended to be suppressed by this Committee.

Resolved

That the further consideration of the subject referred to in the extract above.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: Joseph Langton, William Loukes and Charles Haslam.


POLICE RELIEF FUND

Gratuity

That upon consideration of the report this day made by the Chief Constable of the past services and present position of Inspector Baxendale, as also of his family, the sum of £50 be allowed to him out of the Police Relief Fund for the purpose of enabling him, as he proposes to set up in business, and thereby obtaining a livelihood, such amount to be paid to him under the direction of the Chief Constable.


Meeting 4th December 1845

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

 

George Fox Thomas Powell
Thomas Muldoon John Viggor
John Thornton James Martin
Shakespeare TaborJob Wigley
William BradfordHenry Bateman
John Berry Charles Hudson


Memorandum

Extract from the minutes of the Nuisance Committee's proceedings:

That the Watch Committee be requested to allow the officials on duty at the Stations for Chorlton upon Medlock and Ardwick receive deposits for all stray cattle or other property taken out of the penfolds in those Townships in the same way as is already done at the Town's Yard in Clarence Street.

Resolved

That the Nuisance Committee be informed that this Committee consider it desirable not (without absolute necessity)to vary from the Rule which they laid down “that the Police shall not take in any case receive such deposits” and therefore suggest to that Committee the propriety of making a similar arrangement in the Townships of Chorlton upon Medlock and Ardwick as that which now exists in the township of Manchester.


Meeting 11th October 1845

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: John Brumley and Samuel Freemen

SUNDAY TRADING

Memorandum

The memorial upon this subject laid before this Committee on the 27th November last having been taken into consideration.

Resolved

That all those parties who open their places of business on Sunday be warned by the Police that if the practice be continued they will be proceeded against according to the law, and that the chief Constable give directions that a number of parities in each Division who may disregard such notice be brought before the Magistrates.

Memorandum

The Chief Constable having reported that a very great nuisances was created by the deposits of vegetable and animal matter in the yard behind the Oldham Road Station.

Resolved

That a copy of the Chief Constable's report be transmitted the The Lamp and Scavenging Committee and that they be requested to make arrangements for giving up the yard to the Watch Committee with as little delay as possible.


Meeting December 18th 1845

Resolved

That Sub-Inspector Stanford having appeared before this Committee is hereby appointed Inspector at the wages of 30/- per week.

Resolved

That the following constables having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Sub-Inspectors at the wages of 25/- per week:

Police Constable A 35 John Barratt

Police Constable A 34 Richard Johnson

Police Constable E Charles S Evans

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are appointed Constables of the Borough: Joseph Newton, Edward Anthony and James Maycock.


Meeting 24th December 1845

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed constables of the Borough:

 

Henry Butler James Whitehurst
Frederick Mould John [Mitcham]
William Woodall John Brown
John Davies

 

Meeting 2nd January 1846

Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the Lamp and Scavenging Committee's proceedings was read out:

That the Watch Committee be informed that the yard adjoining the Plaice Lock-up in Oldham Road, and is used as a manure deposit, will as early as possible, be given up to them at a rent of £15 per annum.

Resolved

That the Chief Constable be authorised to secure possession of the yard referred to in the above extract, on the terms therein stated.

Resolved

That James Wilkinson having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed a Constable of the Borough.

Memorandum

The Chief Constable having reported that a notice had been served upon Mr Leary Superintendent of the B Division on behalf of the Leeds Railway Company of their intention to apply during the ensuing session of Parliament for power to purchase and take into their possession the yard behind the Oldham Road Station.

Resolved

That the Town Clerk be instructed to take such steps as may be necessary for opposing the proposal of the Manchester and Leeds Railway Company to take the yard behind the Oldham Road Station unless the whole of the Police Station be included in the Schedule of the proposed Bill.

Meeting 8th January 1846

Resolved

That the Police Constable be instructed to apply to Mr Higson, the Clerk to the Justices for the money received by the Court for the service of notices by Police, upon the parties who have obtained licences for keeping billiard tables, the service and allowances in such cases being precisely similar to those connected with Public House Licences, the allowances for which are received and paid into the Police Relief Fund.

Meeting 22nd January 1846

Resolved

That the following parties have appeared before the Committee and are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:


Thomas Keating

Robert Holden

Robert Humphreys

Phillip Barrett

Charles Wadsworth

James Brunt

Walter Thorburn

James Rodgers


Meeting 29th January 1846

Resolved

That Sub-Inspector Richard Ward having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Inspector at the wages of 30/- per week in place of Robinson dismissed.

Resolved

That Plaice Constable John Davis, C Division having appeared before the Committee hereby appointed Sub-Inspector at the wage s of 25/- per week in place of Butcher reduced.

Meeting 5th February 1846

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:


George Darlington

John Jackson

James Barber

John Payne

Benjamin Goodbehere

John Hoey

William Plum

James Shrives

Robert Duckworth

John Buddon

John Swindells

Hugh Kileen


Meeting 12th February 1846

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

Thomas Holland, Robert Gradwell James Gatley and Thomas Ditchfield.

Meeting 19th February 1846

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: Thomas Norbury and Samuel Haigh.

Meeting 26th February 1846

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of this Borough:

John Turner

James Ellerton

William Cool

Daniel Burhenhough


CRIMINAL RETURNS

Memorandum

Chief Constable's Report

The Chief Constable in presenting for the approval of the Watch Committee the Criminal and Other Miscellaneous Returns for the year 1845 (being the third year of the working of the Police Establishment under the Watch Committee of the Town Council) is gratified in being enabled to give a satisfactory report, both as regards the state of crime as well as all other matters connected with the working of the Police Force within the Borough. In the report presented with the statistical returns for the year 1844 it was shewn that during the year crime had been considerably on the decrease – that the apprehensions were much fewer than in any one year since the year 1839 (when the Police Force was established) that the proportions of discharges had been considerably less than in any former year, and that although fewer persons had been taken into custody , the actual convictions were much more numerous than shewn in any of the previous returns. The returns now submitted show again a decrease in the numbers of apprehensions, as compared with 1844 of 1067 persons, also a decrease in the number of discharges of 2199 persons, an an increase in the number of convictions of 1156 persons, and as compared with the returns for the year 1843 (being the first year for which complete returns of the working of the Police Force under the direction of the Committee were prepared) they show a decrease in the number of apprehensions of 2512 persons, and in the number of discharges of 4557 persons, and an increase in the number of Summary Convictions of 2136 persons when compared with the returns for the year 1842, the present returns show a decrease in the number of apprehensions of 4166 persons, and as compared with the year 1841, a decrease in the apprehensions, of 3710 persons, and in the number of discharges of 6357 persons, and an increase of nearly 3000 in the Summary Convictions. These facts will be more fully seen by reference to to Table No 16, as well as in the following tabular statement of the percentage of discharges, Summary Convictions and committals for trial which have occurred in each of the years now last referred to.


Years

Total Number of apprehensions in each year

Percentage of the discharges

Percentage of the Summarily Convicted

Percentage of the committed for trial

1840

12417

73.1

20.48

6.41

1841

13345

76.49

16.02

7.48

1842

13801




1843

12147

69.21

24.54

6.24

1844

10702

56.53

37.01

6.45

1845

9635

39.96

53.11

6.92


No just comparison can be made as respects the disposal of the prisoners apprehended in 1842, and in the year 1845, as the prisoners who were apprehended during the disturbances in the months of August and September 1842 are not accounted for in any of the Police Books. But without taking notice of any of the prisoners last, (who were probably generally discharged) the discharges for the whole of the year 1845 are fewer by 2456 persons, than for the first seven months of the year 1842.

As it is supposed by many persons that the apprehensions were unusually numerous in consequence of the disturbances which took place in the months of August and September in the year 1842, it may be well to state that the number of apprehensions during those two months were on average 149 per month fewer than during the previous months of the same year. It is therefore evident, that the number of apprehensions was not increased by the riots which then occurred, but probably the general depressions of trade which existed both before and immediately subsequent to the turn out and cessation from labour of the operative classes may to some extent have caused an increase of offences, and consequently in the number of apprehensions which took place in the years 1841 and 1842. When however the great proportion of discharges, and the small number of convictions as compared with the number of apprehensions at that period, as shown by the returns, are considered it would not be altogether just to consider the number of apprehensions as a correct index of the amount of crime. It is also obvious that the increase which is shown in the number of convictions during the past three years does not show an increase of crime inasmuch as the apprehensions are so much fewer than in former years.

The increase in the number of convictions is undoubtedly attributable in some degree to the extended powers of which have been conferred upon the Justices by the Borough Police Act, and also in a perhaps still greater degree to the improved character, intelligence and efficiency of the Police Constables, for it is certain that if the charges brought before the Court had been of a frivolous nature, the proportions of the convictions to the number of apprehensions would have been much less than is shown by the present returns.

As a general rule it may be observed that larger numbers of apprehensions with a great proportion of discharges, and few convictions indicates a want of discretion and efficiency on the part of the Police, whilst a smaller number opf apprehensions with few discharges and a considerable proportion of convictions proves that the Police are acting with ability, discretion and intelligence. It is also worthy of observation that in proportion as the number of the Police Force has been increased, the number of apprehensions has been diminished, and that any diminution in the numbers, and consequently in the efficiency of the protection afforded to the Public by the Police is followed by an increase in the number of offences committed. That this is usually the case has been proved by the observations of the several Superintendents having charge of the Divisions who have ascertained that whenever sickness or other accidental causes they been unable to supply the requisite number of Constables to complete the Beats by night, an increase in the number of offences have almost invariably taken place. In comparing the description of offences committed during the past year with those of previous years as shown by Table No 14 which gives a comparative statement of all the apprehensions according to the offences which have been committed since the year 1849, it is satisfactory to observe that offences of a more serious character affecting the person and property have considerably decreased.

The crimes more especially referred to are robberies from the person by force , assaults with intent to commit robberies , larcenies from the person, larcenies miscellaneous, including all larcenies not specially noticed under separate headings, vagrancy by reputed thieves suspected of being about to commit felonies and assault on and obstructions to the Police in the execution of their duty, and it may be observed that the great diminution of the last named offences is a satisfactory proof of the improved feeling which happily exists on the part of the public towards the Police, as also as of the creditable manner in which their duties are now performed. The only other tables having reference to the Criminal Returns which it may be necessary to notice are Tables No 17 and 24.

The first of these shows the number of robberies which have been committed on Sundays in lock-up-shops, warehouses and dwelling houses during the absence of the owners have been considerably fewer than in the previous year , the numbers being as 28 to 57, and the amount stolen about one third of the sum previously reported to have been taken.

The second table shows that out of the gross amount of £13,213 reported to have been stolen during the year 1845 the sum of £9,532 has been recovered through the instrumentality of the Police, as also the large amount of £2,166 reported by the Public to have been accidentally lost.

In the sum of £13,213 reported to have been stolen is included an amount of £4,888 14s 6½d which was recovered from one individual who had embezzled property belonging to his employer to a larger extent than has before come under the observation of the Police in this Borough, and this class of offence appears either to have been on the increase or that more numerous discoveries have been made by Masters of robberies having been committed by persons in their employ.

The next Table is a statistical Police History of all Prisoners who have been transported during the year 1845, showing the number of times they have been severally been in custody, their respective number of discharges, committals for trial, and sentences of punishment.

The miscellaneous Returns comprise a series of tables containing much variety of information of a useful and important character.

It will be seen on reference to Table No 25, that the sum of £1617 18s 8d has been taken from persons found drunk and incapable in the streets and restored to them when sober, & of which amount it is probable that the greater proportion of it would have been stolen excepted for the interference of the Police, the same table also shows that 2628 premises have been found by the Police insecure at night by doors and windows not being fastened , 1521 of which consisted of warehouses and Lock-up-shops containing property in which no parties resided and 674 of premises in which parties did reside -it also shows that 16 lives have been reported as saved by the Police - several from drowning in the canal, and several of children from burning.

Table No 26 shows that 137 fires have taken place during the year, 40 of which were extinguished by aid of the engines, 5 by the Police and Firemen without engines, 13 by the Police only,36 by the Police and neighbours, and 43 by the inhabitants alone. The number of buildings which were insured amounted to 90, the number not insured to 47, the probable value of the buildings which have been on fire is estimated at £191602 and the amount of damage they have received at £10137; the value of the property destroyed is estimated at £56582 and the amount of property saved which was considered in danger at £247077.

Table No 27 shows the total number of complaints against Public Houses have amounted to 227, the number of acquittals to 14, and the amount of penalties with costs to £174 4s 0d – and the succeeding Table shows that the reports against Beer Houses have amounted to 483, the acquittals to 31, and the penalties including costs to £319 9s 6d.

Table No 29 gives an account of the number of Brothels, Low Lodging Houses, Houses for the resort of thieves &c and although these do not vary considerably in numbers from those stated in the returns for the previous year which can hardly be expected considering the great increase of the Town in buildings and population, they are nevertheless fewer in numbers than they were stated to be in last years returns.

Table No 30 contains a list of the offences against the local Acts which have been taken notice of both Police Constables as well as by the Nuisance Officers attached to the Divisions which without enumerating the Sanitary Case, special case and Hackney Coach cases in which the Police the Police do not interfere, amounted in number to 6105 of which 3741 have been noticed by the Constables and 2364 by the Nuisance Officers, and out of the gross number reported, only 17 cases were not proved and the fines amounted to £541 16s 6d.

It will be seen on reference to Table No 32 that 1500 new buildings were erected within the Borough during the year 1845, 1376 of which consisted of dwelling houses and habitable shops that the gross number of new buildings which have been erected within the Borough during the years 1843, 1844 and 1845 have amounted to 3428 of which 32o3 consist of dwellings and habitable shops.

The next Table contains a return of of all the buildings within the Borough with the supposed amount of population which has been computed at the rate of six persons for every inhabited house and shop within the A + B Divisions, and 5 ½ persons for the same description of tenement in the C + D Divisions and 4 persons for every occupied cellar.

This return has been made with great care and certainly is not over stated as respects of the number of buildings , and provided that the computation of numbers allowed to each occupied dwelling house and cellar has not been over drawn the population will have increased from 235507 as given in the last Census to 295277 being a gross increase of 59770.

The last Table shows that the dismissals from the Police Force have been about one half less than they were in 1844 and thereby gives conclusive evidence that a decided improvement in the conduct of the Constables has taken place. The Chief Constable thinks it may be desirable to refer briefly to the expenditure of the Force before concluding this report.

The sum which it was estimated would probably be required for the maintenance of the Police Force from the first day of May 1845 to the 30th April 1846 was stated at £26,337. This was based upon the same principle as those that were observed in making the previous estimates. Allowing the full expense in pay and clothing to the additional Constables which were added to the Force and 2/3rds of the pay for the extra Supernumeraries. The Chief Constable is now enabled to state with certainty that the yearly expenditure, after making a liberal allowance for all extra beside the ordinary weekly wages and monthly salaries , will not exceed £24000 as the gross expense for the the first 10 months of this year now completed has only amounted £19214.

In further proof of this calculation, it may be stated that the actual expenditure on account of the Force for the financial year ending the 31st day of August 1845 ( as published in the Treasurer's Returns) only amounts to £23104 6s 10d being a less amount than was annually expend prior to the Committee resuming the control of the Police, although 85 more men have been regularly maintained.

The Chief Constable in conclusion is happy in being able to state that the Borough is in a most peaceable and orderly state and that the Police are performing in every way satisfactory to the Chief Constable and the Superintendents an d creditable to the Force.


Meeting 5th March 1846

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: John Hodgnis, Ira Dean and Thomas Limpson.


POLICE RELIEF FUND

Resolved

That upon consideration of the report this day made by the Chief Constable of the past services and present state of health and situation of Police Constable 58Samuel Bolton and of his family , the sum of 8/6 per week be allowed to him out of the Police Relief Fund as a superannuation allowance.


Meeting 12th March

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: Joseph Septimus Barker, William Wood, Peter Kearns, Eli Wadsworth,Henry Pullen.

Meeting 26th March 1846

Resolved

That John Thompson having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed a Constable of the Borough.

Meeting 2nd April 1846

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: William Code, George Barber and Patrick Moran.

Memorandum

The following letter to Captain Willis was read out:

Sir,

I beg to complain of a report made by Inspector Maybury in reference to evidence I gave at a recent trial at Liverpool against Wigan and others, and which report from its incorrectness has seriously affected my character. I respectfully request to have the matter investigated before the Watch Committee, and to be allowed to produce evidence in support of its incorrectness.

I am ,Sir

Your obedient Servant,

William Perkins

Resolved

That this Committee does not consider there is any case for further investigation inasmuch as there is ample evidence before this Committee that the report made by Inspector Maybury to the Chief Constable is strictly correct, and is in fact admitted to be so by Mr Perkins himself.

That this Committee cannot enquire into the reason which may have induced any subsequent alteration in the determination of the Recorder as to the payment of Mr Perkins' expenses as made in writing through the Clerk of The Peace to the prosecuting solicitor and now produced and which is in the following terms viz: “that as Mr Perkins altered his evidence in some respects , he will not allow his expense.”


Meeting 9th April 1846


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:


Christopher Owen

Thomas Foulkes

James Bates

James Fisher

George Cutts

David Hughes


Meeting 23rd April 1846


Resolved

That Sub-Inspector John Buckley, E Division having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Inspector in the place of Richard Green resigned at the wage of 30/- per week.


Resolved

That Police Constable Darby Moran, E Division having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Sub-Inspector in the place of Buckley promoted at the wage of 25/- per week.


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: James Mitchell, Jonathan Ainsworth and Joseph Walker.


Memorandum

The following letter to captain Willis was read out:

Manchester and Birmingham Railway

Superintendent's Office

Manchester April 3rd 1846

London Road


Dear Sir,

The bearer R Ryder is [a] Policeman on this railway at this station. I would esteem it a favour if you would have him sworn in as a special peace officer of the Borough.

Yours truly,

C Poulett Harris

Superintendent of the Line


Resolved

That the application made by in the letter now read cannot be complied with inasmuch as there does not appear to be sufficient grounds to induce this Committee to swear in as Constable the party named who will not be absolutely under the direction and control of this Committee.


Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the Market Committee from April 17th were read out:

That the following parties be and there are hereby appointed to be Inspectors of Slaughter Houses and Meat under the power in that behalf given by the 7th and 8th Victoria cap 40 (The Borough Police Act) and that they be require forthwith to make and subscribe in the presence of the Mayor the declaration required by the said Act before entering upon the duties of the office viz:


James Sawley

Superintendent of Police

Timothy Leary

Superintendent of Police

Richard Cochrane

Superintendent of Police

John Taylor

Superintendent of Police

George H Norton

Clerk of the Markets

Stephen Neal

Superintendent of Nuisance Inspectors



Resolved

That the course proposed to be taken by the Markets' Committee so far as related to the appointment of the Superintendents of the Divisions as Inspectors of Slaughter Houses and Meat, be, and hereby approved .


Resolved

That this Committee is of [the] opinion that advantage will be derived from the Chief Constable ascertaining all the arrangements to be made for the control and management of the Metropolitan and Dublin Police Forces, and that the Chief Constable be authorised and instructed to at such period as may be most convenient to arrange to visit for that purpose London and Dublin.


Meeting 30th April 1846

CLOTHING

Resolved

That the committee be summoned to attend at the Fairfield St Station on Monday 4th May at ½ past 2 o'clock in the afternoon to inspect the new clothing, and that the whole of the Police Force be then required to attend.


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables for this Borough: James Sanders and John Smith.


Meeting 7th May 1846

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

William Astler and Richard Wood

Fairfield Street Station

Memorandum

The Chief Constable having reported that the Fairfield [Street] Station required lighting.


Resolved

That the Chief Constable be authorised to the necessary alterations made for lighting the cells at this Station.


Statistical Returns

That the sun of £20 be allowed & paid to Mr Macdonald, Clerk in the Police Offices, in consideration of the extra time devoted by him in preparing and superintending the printing of the Statistical Returns for this and the two previous years.


Meeting 14th May 1846


Resolved

That James Smith having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed a Constable.


Meeting 21st May 1846

Memorandum

The Following extract from the minutes of the Nuisance Committee's proceedings was read out:

Memorial from occupiers of premises in Fountain Street and Market Street complaining of the obstruction caused by parties loitering at the corner of Fountain Street in Market Street and resolved that the attention of the Watch Committee be called to the complaint.

Resolved

That the necessary steps be taken to secure the abatement of the Nuisance complained of in the memorial.


Meeting 11th June 1846

Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the Nuisance Committee's proceedings was read out;

that this Committee consider it undesirable to fill up the vacancies occasioned by the removal or dismissal of the Nuisance Inspectors, and that the Watch Committee be therefore requested to direct the Police Officers to take cognizance of and report , so far as may be found practicable the cases of nuisances heretofore generally attended to by the Inspectors of Nuisances.

Resolved

That the same be referred to the Chief Constable, and that he be requested to make a report thereon.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:


Henry Sutton

William Bowcock

John Casson

John[Aloce]

Hugh Mayor



Fire Engine Department

Memorandum

The following extract from the Minutes of the Lamp, Scavenging and Hackney Coach Committee's proceedings was read out:

That the Watch committee be informed of that as the Contract with the Road and Street Cleansing Committee Company for the scavenging by which the horses for the Fire Service and the Police Van have hitherto be provided will terminate on the 24th instant , and that as in the new contract they will only be required to sweep those streets which can be swept by machine: this Committee has entered into an agreement with Mr William Rose for the supply of horses and carts, and drivers for the hand scavenging, and the removal of nightsoil, and that the said Committee be recommended to negotiate with Mr Rose for the supply of horses and drivers for the Police Van and Fire Engines.

Memorandum

Also read was the following tender from Mr Rose:

I will furnish the Watch committee with two horses and and driver for the use of the Prisoners' Van, and three for the use of the Fire Engines: these horses to be always ready in the stable to run out with the Fire Engines when required for the sum of £260 per annum. The van horses when unemployed e van to be to be used in the Fire Engines when fire occurs.

Resolved

That the Tender of Mr Rose now read be and is hereby accepted, and that the Town Clerk prepare the requisite agreement for execution by Mr Rose.


Meeting 2nd July 1846

Resolved

That the following Police Constables having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Sub-Inspectors at the wages of 25/- per week:

A38 Robert Rogers


A 58 William Chalkley


D 42 John Tolton


D 62 Thomas Partington



Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

John Arrowsmith, John Swallow William Barker John Harnell Charles Wallwin Thomas Dickenson .

Memorandum

Report on the estimate and proposed increase of the Police Force.

In preparing for the consideration of The Watch committee the estimate of the probable amount of money which may be required for the maintenance of the Police from the the first day of May 1846 to 30th day of April 1847, the Chief Constable has deemed it requisite, after making a careful review of the whole Police system as regards to the Beat Duties , and the general efficiency which exists to meet the demands of the public for Police protection and assistance; to make provision for an increase to the Force of 2 Sub-Inspectors and 32 Constables to take place on the 1st day of October ensuing.

The Chief Constable has however in the first place stated in the estimate the sum which would be required to maintain the Police Force for the ensuing year with its present complement of Officers and Constables and then he has stated the amount which would be wanted to provide for the proposed increase which he feels assured the Committee on further examination of the report will consider necessary.

The sum which will be required for the maintenance of the Police Force according to its present numbers is stated at £24,782 which amount is less by upwards of £1500 [that] was given in the estimate as the amount as would be required for last year, although several Constables are therein provide for the full year, who in the previous estimate were only provided for the period of 7 months.

The amount which would be required in providing for the proposed increase is stated at £25,821 and this sum is also less by upwards of £500 then was given as the estimate for last year notwithstanding the provision which is made for the proposed additional Officers and Constables.

The estimate which was submitted for the maintenance of the Police for the past year amounted to £26,325, but the expenditure did not amount to more than £24,200, being less than the estimate by upwards of £2,100.

In regard to the application for an increase of Officers and Constables, the Chief Constable would beg to draw the attention of the Committee to the great increase which has taken place within the Borough, in population and buildings, which latter have multiplied in some districts, but more especially in the township of Hulme and Chorlton that the time of many of the Beats in consequence of the Constables having to perambulate the interior has been more than doubled.

The Offences against the Local Acts are also most numerous, and the time of the Constables is very considerably occupied in attending to and following up these cases, and now that the Nuisance Committee propose giving up some of their Officers and throwing all this duty into the hands of the Police, the time of the men will be much occupied.

Whilst on this subject it might be well to remark that the time of the Inspectors is very much occupied in having to write all the nuisance occurrences so much so, that they are not able to perform their visiting duties which is a serious detriment to the service and this evil can only be remedied by having a clerk appointed to each station who might be maintained at the joint expense of the Watch and Nuisance Committees.

The special duties which comprise all duties out of the ordinary routine as attending public meetings, concerts, theatres &c are also extremely numerous, and in the A Division the number of men who have been employed during the last 6 months has averaged 6½ Constables per day for 7½ hours duty; the A Division has also been lately called upon to furnish 3 constables for the for the markets 3 days per week on the morning of the market days and as their duties last for about nine hours they are of course unable to take any other duty for three days in each week.

In regards to the distribution of the Constables the Committee will find this fully detailed in the accompanying reports of the Superintendents which show that the time which is occupied in working the Beats which it is proposed to alter, in most instances considerably exceeds 2 hours.

The Chief Constable assures the Committee that it is his anxious desire not unnecessarily to increase the Public expenditure on account of the police, but feeling assured that the wants of the Town in regard to Police protection are not adequately provided for, he has considered it his duty to recommend the above named augmentation of the Police Force.

[A table setting out the expenditure for the following year was minuted.]

Resolved

That the report of the Chief Constable now read, stating the the result of his observations which he has been enabled to make with respect to the different systems of police management &c in London and Dublin, be entered on the minutes of this Committee's proceedings.

Report

The Chief Constable in submitting for the information of the Watch Committee the following report on the observations which he been enabled to collect respecting the different systems which are in operation in working the London Metropolitan, City of London and Dublin Metropolitan Police Forces, which the Watch Committee were kind enough to permit him to visit for the purpose of inspection, is afraid some surprises may possibly be felt by the Committee to find that few hints have been gained which are likely to contribute to the advantage or improve the system at present ion operation in the Manchester Police.

The Chief Constable is indeed of the opinion that in most respects the system adopted in working the Manchester Police is superior to those which are in operation in the three old established Police Forces which he has just visited, the Chief Constable is however ready to admit that there are one or two points resulting from the insight which he has made into the workings of these Police Forces which enables him to offer for the consideration of the Watch Committee suggestions for an alteration in one or two particulars in the working of the Manchester system, as also augments for an increase in the number of the Force.

The Chief Constable will in the first place briefly notice the relative numbers, expense and population of the three forces as compared to Manchester.

The London Metropolitan Police is divided into 18 Divisions including the Detective force which forms part of the A Division: the numbers of the force according to the returns made up to the 1st day of January last amounted 4749 persons without including the Commissioner and the yearly expense was stated at £313620.

The population within the Police limits is estimated at 2,068,107 persons which gives an average of one constable for every 435 inhabitants.

The City of London Police is divided into six divisions ; the numbers of the force amount to 543 persons, and the yearly expense is about £43,000 the population within the Police limits is estimated at 125,273 persons which gives an average of one constable for about every 230 inhabitants.

The Dublin Police is divided into six divisions, and the numbers of the force amount to upwards of 1100 persons: the actual expense the Chief Constable was unable to exactly ascertain, but he was led to understand about £22,000 per annum was paid out of the consolidated fund towards its maintenance, and that this amount constituted somewhere about one half of the expenditure. The population of what may be said to be the Town or City of Dublin is estimated at 250,000, and the number of Constables appointed to that district at 700 which gives an average of Constable for every 357 inhabitants.

The Borough of Manchester is formed into four Police districts or divisions, there is also a separate department for detective purposes denominated the Detective Division, the average number employed during the past year including supernumeraries amounted to 421 persons, and the yearly expense to £24,200. The population is computed at 295,277 persons, which gives an average of one Constable for every 701 inhabitants.

It will thus be seen that the proportion of Constables to the number of inhabitants as regards to Manchester is much fewer than in either the London Metropolitan, the City of London or the City of Dublin Police Districts.

As respects to the systems which are adopted in performing the outdoor or beat duties in the several Police Forces there appears to very little difference, but Manchester has a decided disadvantage in the paucity of men and consequent large extent of the beats as compared with the Metropolitan Police Districts.

In all the populous parts of London and Dublin the beats average in time from 10 minutes to a quarter of an hour and twenty minutes , and in the country parts around the metropolis from 20 minutes to half and three quarters of an hour.

Thus it appears impossible that any occurrence of importance should take place especially in the populous parts of the Town, without the almost immediate presence of a Constable.

In Manchester out of the gross number of day beats amounting in number to 47, only 10 are under twenty minutes, and none less than a quarter of an hour, 9 are between twenty five and thirty minutes, 2 of thirty five minutes, 6 between forty five minutes and one hour, 5 range from one hour to one hour and a half and 2 from one hour and a half to two hours, the remaining 13 are what are termed posts on beats in the main streets or roads which the Constables traverse without taking the interior and these kinds of beats are absolutely necessary in the great thoroughfares during the day where the services of the Constables are most frequently required, for if the men were made to take the interior of the ground , neither their own Officers or the Public would be able to find them when Police assistance was probably, especially wanted.

In the evening duties when both sections of the day Constables are on duty the beats are increased to 94, of which there are 3 beats of 10 minutes, 10 of fifteen minutes, 13 of twenty minutes, 25 varying between twenty minutes and half an hour, 5 between thirty and forty minutes, 7 between forty and fifty minutes, 6 between fifty and sixty minutes, 2 between sixty and seventy five minutes, 5 of ninety minutes, 3 of two hours an a half and one of three hours. The remaining 14 as in the morning are posts in the main streets.

It may be remarked that the Beats both for days as well as evening duty are seldom or ever complete in consequence of the numerous calls which take the men away to attend special duties, nuisances, and other offences which are continually occurring.

In the arrangement for night duty there 224 Beats of which, 1 only is under 15 minutes, 17 are of twenty minutes, 26 of twenty five minutes, 34 of thirty minutes, 31 between thirty and forty minutes, 40 between forty and fifty minutes, 10 of fifty five minutes, 22 of one hour hour, 15 between one hour and a quarter(sic), 9 of one hour and a half, 4 of one hour and three quarters, 3 of two hours, 3 of two hours and a half, and 2 of three hours. The remaining 7 are patrols who traverse the main roads leading out of the Borough , and these men have been found to be of great service in affording protection to females , and other persons in returning home at night, for prior to their establishment several assaults and attempts at robbery took place which has not been the case since they were placed on these roads.

By the above statement in regard to the size of the night beats the Committee will perceive that there are several which will require alterations, as the subject however of granting an increase to the Force will be made the matter of a separate report it will not be necessary at present to enter into full particulars of the arrangement which will be proposed.

Whilst however on the subject of night duty, the Chief Constable will name a plan which has been adopted in the London Metropolitan and which he was informed had worked most beneficially both in the prevention of crime as well as in the detection of offenders.

In each Metropolitan Police Division six steady Officers or Constables are appointed each night to do duty in plain clothes, these men in case notice has been received notice that a robbery is contemplated, or that suspicious characters have been seen about the Town are directed to pay particular attention to the district, and the parties who are watching the Police Constable round his beat with the view of obtaining an opportunity of committing a robbery, are thus in their turn watched by the Officers in plain clothes.

In case there are no particular informations received at the Stations these men are sent into different districts of the Division with instructions (in case no particular matter occurs to require their services) to meet and report at different places and times to the visiting Officer of the section so that the Officer may see that they are sober and regular. These Constables are relieved as occasions may require at an early hour in the morning, and they thus become available the next day both for special duties, and are also employed in tracing offenders.

The above plan was suggested by the Superintendent of the Detective Force who found that to take exclusively to his own Department the tracing out of cases did not work well for the general good of the service, that the men of the Divisions (many of whom from being located in particular districts were better acquainted with the thieves and bad characters than the Detective Officers) became indifferent as to the service, and that many parties who might have been arrested easily in the Division immediately after an offence took place, escaped because of delay, and from the want of interest exhibited on the part of the Constables to give information when they felt that others were to reap all the merit and advantage which might be attached to the case.

This Superintendent who was selected by the Commissioners to afford the Chief Constable every information respecting the Metropolitan Police System had in consequence of his opinion as above stated, given up the charge of the Detective Force and received from the Commissioners, the command of one of the most important Police Divisions in the Metropolis.

In Manchester a plan very similar to the one which has been adopted in London has been partially in operation for some time (and as in London) the results have been most beneficial both in preventing crime, in apprehending offenders, and in creating on the part of the Constables a high degree of interest in the service. It is for instance a rule in the Manchester Police whereas a crime is committed in any of the Divisions that a route or report of the occurrence shall be transmitted without delay to the Detective Office, but it is also required that the Officer of the Division shall also without loss of time, use every means in their power to discover and apprehend the offender if the case requires it. Also when informations are received by the Officers in charge of Divisions that offences are likely to be committed in any part of their Divisions, or that suspicious parties are loitering about their district, the Officer has usually united one or two of the smaller beats and placed the relieved Constables on duty in plain clothes to watch the movement of the parties, and the results have generally proved beneficial.

The power however to give effect to the plan as carried out in London would require the sanction of the Committee for the grant of Constables for the purpose, so that the beats may be maintained complete

As respects the inducement which is stated is held out in the Manchester Police to all Constables to take an interest in the service, it may be observed that a rule is established that in any case where a Constable obtains information on particular matters connected with Police business, even should he be a perfect novice in the Service, by naming the matter to his Superintendent, every assistance will be afforded him to bring the case to perfection, either by having an old and intelligent Officer appointed to instruct him how to act, or by the personal advice and aid of the Superintendents, but he will never be supplanted in the case, or have the matter placed in other hands.

The next point for observation in regard to the system adopted in London Metropolitan Police Force to which the Chief Constable deems in necessary to refer to is the locating the men who are not actually quartered in Barracks near to the Stations.

The Chief Constable does not recommend the Barracks System for Police Constables, but he is of the opinion that great advantaged might be derived (as in London) from the renting of small houses close to the Police Stations and letting them off to the married men who would take in single men as lodgers; this plan is adopted in London for those parties who are allowed to live out of barracks, and the only control which is exercised over the Constable-staking the houses is the supervision and inspection of an Officer once every week to see and report that they are kept in a clean and healthy state.

If such a plan were adopted by the Watch Committee the men instead of being lodged in a straggling way all over the Borough would be brought within immediate call of the Stations, the advantages of collecting the men in sudden disturbances would be very great, the trouble of visiting them in sickness would be greatly diminished, the regularity in their attendance for duty and when being relieved from duty would be greatly increased, the offences for being late for duty as well as other offences would probably be greatly diminished, and the rents of houses for which the Committee would be answerable would be always secure and duly paid.

At present the men are scattered in different residences over all parts their respective divisions, it is always difficult to collect them when wanted on an emergency and when reporting themselves sick the time of the Officers is occupied for a long time in visiting their different residences to ascertain if their statements are correct, the surgeon has also much difficulty in finding out their residences which causes his visits to be irregular.

The Chief Constable thinks the plan of taking houses for the use of the Constables near to the stations as adopted in London well worthy of the consideration of the Committee.

As regards to the systems which are adopted in performing the Divisional Office duties in the three Police Forces referred to, as compared to Manchester,The Chief Constable would state generally that in not one of the Forces are there kept at any of the Stations any recorded informations of the general state of the Division or of the houses and places of ill resort, or of other matters of detail connected with the Division as is preserved in the Manchester Force.

In the City of London Police they have indeed only one book at a Station into which every sort of matter or occurrence is entered without form or plan , and in the other Forces although far beyond the City Police in this respect , they are still considerably behind the Manchester Police in detail and in classifying the different matters and subjects which have to be recorded and kept both for present advantage and reference as well as for future use in compiling the returns.

The mode of dealing with the complaints against Constables made by there own officers for omissions and violations of duty the Chief Constable found to be in a great measure similar in each of the three Forces, but quite dissimilar to the plan pursued by the Manchester Police and manifestly inferior to the system adopted in the latter Force.

In the Metropolitan police the Superintendents of the several Divisions are allowed to fine their men to a certain extent, but no uniform plan or rule is adopted, for each Officer can fine or let his men off with a caution according as he considers a man's general behaviour deserves, omissions of duty for being absent from beats even for a considerable length of time may be met with a caution by one Superintendent for several times together, whilst another Superintendent may under similar circumstances nominally impose a fine.

The above system exists in all of the three Forces , but it is carried out to a further extent in the City of [London] Police by the power of fining being extended to the Inspectors. Appeals are certainly allowed to the Commissioners, but in the City of London Police the appeal must first be made to the Superintendents at the Old Jewry and then to the Commissioners.

When so many persons are allowed to judge the charges against the Constables, it is evident that no uniformity of decisions for offences of a similar class can be maintained throughout the Force, a door is also opened for favouritism, and the constables will continually be seeking to be transferred from one Division to another to get away from the control of officers who may be considered stern, to be under the charge of those who have the character for leniency. These and other evils which cannot fail to arise from such a system, the Chief Constable conceives must operate most prejudicially to the good working of the Force.

One point however in regard to the plan which is adopted in London in proportioning the amount of fines for being late for duty according to the times the offender may be absent appeals worthy of consideration.

In Manchester the uniform rate of 1/- has invariably been imposed for being late for duty without reference to the time of absence excepting, when it had been ascertained that an officer has intentionally been absent when a heavier fine has been imposed, but the general plan of proportioning the amount of the penalty to the time of absence as adopted in London the Chief Constable thinks is more preferable, as an inducement is continually held out to the Constable when late to make the best of his way to the Station lest his fine should be made heavier.

The Chief Constable would not recommend that any positive sum should be fixed as the fine for being a few minutes late, nor that any specified time should be named for increasing the fine, as some men would take advantage of the regulations, and not care to be late if the fine were very low, or being late would remain absent until the first limit of time had nearly expired. As a general rule however the Chief Constable thinks it would be sufficient to impose as a fine on men who were generally correct and attentive to their duties.

The only remaining subject which the Chief Constable thinks is necessary to remark upon relate to the general appearance of the Constables of the several Forces, and to their efficiency in drill.

As respects general appearance the Dublin Force is certainly superior either to the London Metropolitan or the City of London Forces, they are also exceedingly well drilled, and from the larger size and strength of the men who average nearly 5 feet 11 inches in height, they posses a great advantage in putting all street disturbances, indeed it is assured by the officers of the Force that many parties who would with men of their own size not be taken into custody quietly, give themselves up immediately to the large sized and powerful men feeling satisfied that it would be useless to resist.

It may be a question therefore , if the larger sized men have produced the beneficial effects as stated to have been the case in Dublin whether it would not be of advantage to raise the standard of the Manchester Police Force from 5 feet 8 inches to 5 feet 9 inches in height.

The London Metropolitan Police Force appears to the Chief Constable rather to have fallen off in the smartness of appearance which they formally possessed, or if not fallen off, they have not certainly progressed, but allowed younger Forces to obtain the advantage over them in this respect; the cause for this want of general smartness in appearance may possibly be attributable to the deficiency in drill which the men are never obliged to practice after being appointed to act as Constables in the Force, this argument however would not stand good as respects to the City of London Police which is not equal in general appearance to the London Metropolitan Force although drill is imposed as a punishment on Constables for neglect of duty ; drill however as a punishment to Constables who are otherwise burdened with heavy duties is not likely to increase their smartness.

The general appearance of the Manchester Police ; although the average size of the men is less than that of the Dublin

Police, the Chief Constable thinks is quite as creditable in all respects, and he should also take credit as respect to the Constables for being as efficiently drilled, he must however that the Inspectors and Sergeants in the Dublin force know their duty in this respect better than the generality of the Inspectors and Sub-Inspectors belonging to the Manchester Police, which is not to be wondered at, as the Officers of the one Force have always been regularly instructed in drill, whilst the majority in the other Force have not possessed the same advantage especially when juniors, it is however expected that any deficiency in this respect will before long be remedied.

The Chief Constable in returning his best thanks to the Committee for the kind manner in which they have permitted him to visit London and Dublin would briefly wish to remark in conclusion that he had endeavoured in the preceding report to confine himself to those subjects in the administration of the different police systems from which he considered suggestions could be advanced for the advantage of the Manchester Police Service, had he entered into a general details of the comparative merits of the various systems which are adopted in the different Police Forces the Chief Constable thinks he could have shown arguments strongly in favour of the Manchester system which has been so eminently successful both in the prevention of crime as well as in the detection and apprehension of real offenders, and which has also obtained for the Force a high character both for moderation, ability and discretion in the discharge of all its various onerous and trying duties...


Meeting 9th July 1846

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed police Constables:


John T Evans

Thomas Bunting

James Butterworth

Edward Sandford

John Pearson

George Kain

Griffiths Davies Griffiths

Patrick Cahill


Meeting 6th August 1846

Memorandum

The Chief Constable reported that the Lamp &c Committee were prepared to give up possession of the yard behind the Oldham Road Police Station to this Committee, but were prevented from doing so in consequence of the accumulation of manure which the Road and Street Cleansing Company had neglected to remove.

Resolved

That the Road and Street Cleansing Company be informed that unless the manure deposited in such yard be removed within fourteen days from this date, the necessary steps will be taken for disposing of , or removing the same at the expense of the Company.

Memorandum

A charge of Bigamy having been made Inspector Martin of the C Division and the evidence to support which would have to be obtained from Ireland at some expense.

Resolved

That the Chief Constable be authorised and directed to to have the charge made against Inspector Martin enquired into before the Borough Court, and to secure the attendance of the necessary witnesses from Ireland.


Meeting 13th August 1846

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: Bowen Evans, Patrick Clarey, Thomas Moors, Evan Humphreys.

Fire Engine Department Report into Fire Departments in other towns and cities read out.


Meeting 20th August 1846

Memorandum

Letter from William Rose to the Committee resigning as Superintendent of the Fire Service


Meeting 27th August 1846

Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the Public Porks Committee's proceedings was read out:

That the Watch Committee be respectfully requested to direct the attendance of four Police Constables at each of the parks until this Committee has time to make the arrangements which are necessary for the purpose of securing order therein.

Resolved

That the Chief Constable be instructed to comply with the request contained in the above extract and to make arrangements for the attendance of such a number of Police, not exceeding four at each park as shall be considered necessary by the Parks Committee.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:


William Alltree

William Suttons

Patrick O'Shea

Frederick Hollis

Richard Spencer

Amos Shaw

Samuel Frith

William Davies


Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the Council's Proceedings was read out:

That in accordance with the recommendation of the Watch Committee Mr Thomas Rose be, and is hereby appointed (subject to the direction and control of the Chief Constable) the Superintendent of the Fire Brigade at the salary of £200 per annum with the addition of a house free fro taxes , and coals and gas as heretofore allowed, he being required to devote the whole of his time to the duties of situation, and not to engage in any other occupation or business.

Resolved

That the following Police Constables having performed the duty of Sub-Inspectors to the satisfaction of the Chief Constable are hereby appointed Sub-Inspectors at the wages of25/- per week.

C3 William Burgess

C 72 George Urian

C 24 Martin Justin

Meeting 3rd September 1846

Memorandum

Oldham Road Station

The Chief Constable reported that the manure had been removed out of the yard behind this station and suggested that the same required levelling and laying with gravel to render it serviceable to the Police, and also suggested several alterations in the Station for the purpose of providing better accommodation and ventilation there.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee and hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

Thomas Nolan and Dennis Loughlin.

Meeting 10th September 1846

Memorandum

The following extract was read from the minutes of the proceedings of the Markets Committee on the 4th inst.

That the watch Committee be requested to swear in the Collectors and the Assistant Collectors to act as Constables for the purpose of enabling them to assist in preserving order in the Markets.

Resolved

That the consideration of the resolution of the Markets Committee be postponed until the return of of the Chairman and that this decision be communicated to the Markets Committee.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:


George Campbell

James Barratt

Moses Whelan

Jonathan Bolshaw

Henry Booth

Samuel Melbourne

William Goodwin

James Kershaw



Meeting 24th September 1846

Resolved

The following Parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough:

Thomas Hoey and Thomas Stubbs.


Meeting 1st October 1846

Memorandum

That the Inspectors of Nuisances be forthwith withdrawn from the various Police Stations and placed under the direction of the Superintendent of the Nuisances Committee at the Town Hall pursuant to the recommendations contained in the report submitted at the last meeting of this Committee. That a copy be transmitted to the Watch Committee.

Resolved

That Sub-Inspector Joseph Clarke and Sub-Inspector Matthew Buckley having appeared before this Committee are hereby appointed Inspectors at the wages of 30/- per week.

Resolved

That Police Constable A92 John Barker and Police Constable A56 William Allcock having appeared before this Committee are hereby appointed Sub-Inspectors at the wages of 25/-.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are appointed Constables of the Borough:


Thomas Passman

James Conroy

Edward Hunt

John Moran

Edward Walton

John Heely


Resolved

That the Town Clerk acknowledges the receipt of Mr Barrow's letter of the 30th September, relative an alleged assault upon his niece by a Police Constable, stating that no other answer than that already sent can be given.


Meeting 8th October 1846

Memorandum

The following extract from the minutes of the proceedings of the Markets Committee was read out:

That the resolution adopted on the 4th September last, requesting the Watch Committee to swear in Collectors and Assistant Collectors as Constables for the purpose of enabling them to assist in the preservation of of order in the Markets be and is hereby rescinded, and that a copy of this resolution be transmitted to the Watch Committee.

Resolved

That Sub-Inspector John Reddish having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed Inspector at the wages of 30/- per week in place of Inspector Hickey resigned.

Meeting 15th October 1846

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables of the Borough: William Berry, John Beatson, Joseph Newbold, John Job and James Herns.

Meeting 22nd October 1846

Resolved

That the following Police Constables having appeared before the Committee are hereby promoted to the Merit Class of Constables at the payment of 18/- per week.


A DIVISION


James Johnson

John Cash

John Gee

Thomas Oldfield

John Dixon

Bartholomew Conway

John Jones

William Dean

Edward Robinson

Timothy Moran

Thomas Flanigan

William Yarwood

John Lowden

John Moxham

John Windsor

James Ratcliffe


B DIVISION


Colin Kenny

James Murphy

Thomas Lancaster

Daniel Mytton

Henry Leech

Richard Tyrrell

James Cooke

Peter Holme

Jonathan Greenhalgh

Samuel McLoughlin

James Palmer

George Pearson


C DIVISION


Frederick William Granham

Fletcher Hill

John Johnston

William Hatton

John Burgess

Michael Lennon

Matthew Gahan

John Porter

James Harper

James Stewart


D DIVISION


Charles Wood

Ephrain Cottrell

Thomas Spencer

Peter Shenton

John Gratrix

Thomas Brough

Thomas Bramhall

Charles Wilson

Ellis Lythgoe

Joseph Bailey


E DETECTIVE DIVISION


Thomas Foulkes


Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables:


Thomas Barker

Isaac Maudesley

John Jardine

William McMellor

Thomas Davies

George Ridley


Resolved

That in consideration of the praiseworthy conduct of Francis Strachan in assisting to protect from brutal violence Police Constable James Cahill and afterwards in giving information to the Police to enable them to discover and apprehend the offenders, and subsequently in convicting the parties when tried before the Recorder, he be allowed and paid out of the Fine Fund £3, as a mark of the appreciation of the Committee of the conduct now brought under their notice.

Resolved

That out of the same fund the sum of £1 10s 0d be also paid to Mrs Hughes for the heroic conduct displayed by her upon the occasion alluded to, in first interfering and casting herself upon the Police Constable when being so brutally attacked.

Meeting 29th October 1846

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables; John Teasdale, James McCormick, John McGurdy and Thomas Ferguson.

Meeting 4th November 1846

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:


Edward Halton

Simon Campion

Enoch Greaves

Joseph Hay

Joseph Priestly

Joseph Cook

James Walker

Joseph Chalinon


Meeting 12th November 1846

Resolved

That the Chief Constable be authorised to get the Police Van repaired at an expense not to exceed £12 10s 0d the amount of the estimate obtained.

Resolved

That the following people having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:


James Matthews

William Joynt

Francis Slater

George Wright

Edward Thornicroft

Thomas Beastall

Francis Chantler

John Barrett

Allen McDermott

Ralph Toplis



Meeting 19th November 1846

Resolved

That the following Police Constables having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Sub-Inspectors at the wages of 25/- per week:

Adam Hunter, Richard Huxley and Henry Carpenter.

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:


James Smith

James Smith [sic]

Matthew Leigh

Michael Cavananah

Daniel Allsop

Abel Lawe

Joseph Lomas

Abraham Ibbotson

George Clough

Samuel Pickford

William Raymon

James Raymon

David Reid

John Price


Meeting 26th November 1846

The following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Constables:

William Hudson, Denis Cahill, Isaac Bailey and Matthew Fealon.


Meeting 3rd December 1846

POLICE LIBRARY

Ordered

That notice be given in the circulars convening the next meeting, “to consider the propriety of establishing a Library for the use and benefit of the Police Officers and Constables.”


Meeting 10th December 1846

Resolved

That under the directions of the Clothing sub Committee the following articles of equipment be obtained:

14 belt and cape straps

50 rattles

68 Snap handcuffs

50 lamps

50 belt plates

20 sets of numbers for supernumeraries top coats.


POLICE RELIEF FUND

Resolved

That upon consideration of the report this day made by the Chief Constable of the past services and present health and of position of Police Constable C77 John Thorpe, and also of his family, the sum of 8/6 per (being one half of his pay) be allowed to him on his retirement from the Force, out of the Police Relief Fund as a superannuation allowance.

Resolved

That upon consideration of the report now made by the Chief Constable of the past services and present state of health and situation of Police Constable D50 John Butcher and also of his family a gratuity of twenty five pounds be made to him on his retirement from the Force out of the Police Relief Fund, the same to be paid in such manner and at each time as the Chief Constable may consider to be desirable.


POLICE LIBRARY

Resolved

That the consideration of the propriety of establishing a Library for the use and benefit of the Police Officers and Constables be postponed until Thursday the 24th instant and that notice of the same be given in circulars.


Meeting 17th December 1846

Resolved

That the following parties having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables:

Edward Taylor, Patrick McGrath and James Leddy.


Meeting 24th December 1846

Resolved

That William Thorniley having appeared before the Committee is hereby appointed a Police Constable.


Meeting 31st December 1846

Resolved

That John Marsland and Joseph Weeling having appeared before the Committee are hereby appointed Police Constables.

Find My Past

This is the end of the piece for now...but it is worth noting that at the first meeting of the Committee in 1847 Charles Brett was appointed a Constable of the Borough. See here.

For a quotation please contact MFHR by using the following link:

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