STRANGEWAYS FELONY REGISTER PART TWO - " Crimes against the order of nature". The case of a man transported twice, each time for twenty years.
 

 

A SITE DESIGNED AND CONSTRUCTED BY A MANCUNIAN

MANCHESTER FAMILY HISTORY RESEARCH

FOR METHODICAL THOROUGH AND EXHAUSTIVE RESEARCH

mail@manchester-family-history-research.co.uk

PUT THE KETTLE ON...AND SETTLE DOWN FOR A READ

 

CONTENTS

HOMEPAGE

A  MANCHESTER RESEARCHER'S TALE

MANCHESTER AND STOCKPORT CERTIFIED INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS

MANCHESTER COURT RECORDS

BELLE VUE PRISON RECORDS

NEW BAILEY PRISON RECORDS

STRANGEWAYS PRISON RECORDS

STRANGEWAYS PRISON: FIRST REPORTS

MANCHESTER MARTYRS' PRISON RECORDS

PRESS REACTION TO THE MANCHESTER EXECUTIONS PART I

PART II

PART III

WHAT  DID HAPPEN TO THE REMAINS OF THE PRISONERS EXECUTED AT MANCHESTER?

THE MANCHESTER FELONY REGISTER PT 1

PART 2

PART 3

PART 4

GREATER MANCHESTER RIOTS IN 1868

MANCHESTER AND LANCASHIRE STRAYS IN MILL BANK PRISON

MANCHESTER POOR LAW AND WORKHOUSE RECORDS

MANCHESTER POOR LAW UNION MINUTES

CHORLTON AND SOUTH MANCHESTER REGISTRATION DISTRICT

VOTING REGISTERS AND ELIGIBILITY IN MANCHESTER

1831 POPULATION FIGURES FOR MANCHESTER

MANCHESTER CENSUS COLLECTION DETAILS

PLACES OF WORSHIP IN MANCHESTER AND SALFORD

MANCHESTER PARISH AND CITY

MANCHESTER CITY CENTRE CHURCHES

MANCHESTER AND GENERAL INFORMATION

MANCHESTER BOROUGH POLICE FORCE

SECOND PART

THIRD PART

FOURTH PART

MANCHESTER INQUESTS WITNESS STATEMENTS INDEX

TRANSPORT IN MANCHESTER PART ONE

PART TWO

USEFUL LINKS

MANCHESTER FAMILY HISTORY CONTACT PAGE

   

 

THE MANCHESTER FELONY REGISTER

Manchester Archives have  launched The Manchester Collection via a Find My Past  of the records from this prison. Many examples from this site were used in the publicity  packs and blogs etc to announce this launch. See the Manchester Collection at the link below.

EXTRACTS FROM THE SURVIVING FELONY PRISON REGISTER OF MANCHESTER AND SALFORD

PART TWO

Please read the opening introduction on the previous page before continuing here. Most of the remarks accompanying the Felony Register entries are based on contemporary newspaper reports and do not reflect my own views.

 

BIRCHING

5564. Patrick McLOUGHIN. When Received:  12th March 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Having on the 3rd March 1866 together with other persons not in custody feloniously + violently beaten + assaulted Thomas Blackmore with great violence robbed him of one purse + 30/- his property at Manchester. Sentence: 10 Years Penal Servitude + 18 stokes with the cat and nine tails. Age: Last July 23 8/12. Ht: 5ft 4 ½ ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Pale, Brown, Hazel. Trade or Profession: Iron Turner. Where Born: Manchester. Last or Usual Address : Shepley St, Manchester. Religion: RC. Education: R + W Imp. Single. English.  Wt in: 7 st 0 lbs. Wt out: 7 st 5 lbs. Marks etc: Cut over right eyebrow + right of forehead, large hollow scar left of forehead, mole right cheek. Previous Committals: 4 mths at City Gaol March 1859. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Apr 26/66 Removed to Millbank.

5565. Thomas GREENWOOD. When Received:  12th March 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Having on the 3rd March 1866 together with other persons not in custody feloniously + violently beaten + assaulted Thomas Blackmore with great violence robbed him of one purse + 30/- his property at Manchester. Sentence: 10 Years Penal Servitude + 18 stokes with the cat and nine tails. Age: Last July 23 8/12. Ht: 5ft 5 ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Brown, Grey. Trade or Profession Labourer. Where Born: Manchester. Last or Usual Address : Silver St, Manchester. Religion: Ch. Education: R + W Imp. Single. English.  Wt in: 10 st 2 lbs. Wt out: 9 st 10 lbs. Marks etc: Cut between eyebrow + right cheekbone, 6 small s… Previous Committals: 6 days at City Gaol 3 years ago. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Apr 26/66 Removed to Wakefield.

The newspapers reported that Patrick McLoughlan (sic) and Thomas Greenwood were charged with having assaulted Thomas Blackburn(sic) and robbed him of 30/-. Blackburn was drinking in the White hart in Gorton on the night of 3rd March and in the presence of the accused place a sovereign and a half in his pocket. They and two other men accompanied Blackburn on his way home, violently attacked him and then stole the money.

By 1861 it was generally accepted that the whipping or birching of adults for criminal offences was not suitable, although it was retained for young offenders under the age of 16. The Whipping Act of 1862 stated that no offender should be whipped more than once for the same offence. However this state of affairs did not last for long. In late 1862 there was a massive increase in the volume of violent crimes in the London area which involved the use of knives and garrotters. These attacks caused panic amongst the middle classes and after such an attack on an MP in the streets of London in 1862 led to the so called “Garrotters Act” being hastily passed by Parliament in 1863. Offenders who committed such crimes were liable to be statutorily imprisoned and flogged more than once, as a fixed penalty.  The Act was passed against the advice of the Home Secretary of the day, by whom it was described as "panic legislation after the panic had subsided". Birching could also be given as a punishment under the 1824 Vagrancy Act.

 

THE HOPWOOD MURDER

6197. James BURROWS. When Received: May 31st 1866. Offence and Where Committed: On the 21st May 1866 wilfully + of malice aforethought killed + murdered one John Brennan at Hopwood. Sentence: DEATH - Executed Aug 25/66. Age Last Sept 18 9/12. Ht: 5ft 6 ½ ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Brown, Hazel. Trade or Profession: Labourer. Where Born: Rossendale. Last or Usual Address: Rochdale Road, Middleton. Religion: Ch. Education: N. Single. English. Wt In: 10 st  5 lbs. Wt Out: Dead. Marks etc: Small scar centre of forehead, cut end of 2nd + 3rd fingers left hand, scar on right arm. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Aug 26/66 Executed.

This case has been widely written about by many other people so I will not dwell on it too much other than to say that James Burrows was the first person to be executed at the New Bailey Prison. This was the first public hanging in the area since 1798. The Manchester Courier in its usual colourful way reported: “Everywhere, from high 'Change to the lowest beerhouse in which persons congregate, the execution has been the ruling topic of conversation. As the hour approached when the last dead[ed] sentence of the law would be carried out into effect, the vicinity of the New Bailey became a centre of universal attraction: and a public anxiety to witness the awful spectacle rose to a pitch of intensity that was painful to contemplate. We know how easy it is to attract a crowd upon the least occasion. but there is something awful in the thought that thousands of persons of both sexes- young, middle-aged, and old -will assemble together and voluntarily undergo severe discomfort, and encounter the absolute risk of death or bodily mutilation, to get a chance  of seeing the convulsive struggles of a fellow-being in the last  agonies of a shameful death upon a scaffold. however, so it is; and whilst executions continue to be held in public, to gratify the wonder or curiosity of a vulgar throng, we may expect such gatherings of sight-seers: for there exists a morbid taste for the horrible-and more especially among the uneducated classes, to which such tragic spectacles minister with degrading effect. The popular ferment in the present case, perhaps the more excusable as this is the first execution, for what is now regarded only as a capital offence that has taken place here for more than half a century. The last execution, we believe, of which there is any record, took place in 1798..."

6212. John WHITTAKER (aka Thos Stephenson). When Received:  June 2nd 1866. Offence and Where Committed: 0n the 31st May 1866 with a certain pistol then loaded + charged with gunpowder + one leaden bullet did feloniously shoot and discharge at one James Burrows with intent to feloniously wilfully + of his malice aforethought to kill + murder him at Oldham. Sentence: 20 Years Penal Servitude. Age: This month 29. Ht: 5ft 8 ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Sallow, Brown, Hazel. Trade or Profession: factory Operative. Where Born: Oldham. Last or Usual Address: Barker St, Oldham. Religion: Ch. Education: R + W Imp. Married + 3 children. English. Wt in: 11 st 6 lbs. Wt out: 11 st 0 lbs. Marks etc: 4 flags + other blue marks on right arm. 2 previous committals (register in last case 4025).When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Aug 30/66 Removed to Wakefield.

When I first came across the above entry, I thought that Whittataker/Stephenson had tried to murder to the above James Burrows, however it was just a coincidence.

 EVIL STEP FATHER AND MOTHER

6237. Henry SMITH. When Received:  June 15th 1866. Offence and Where Committed: On the 6th June 1866 feloniously did cut + wound with a razor the throat of one Mary Davis with intent to kill + murder her. Sentence: 20 Years Penal Servitude. Age: Last Sept 37 9/12. Ht: 5ft 10 ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Sallow, Brown, Hazel. Trade or Profession: Labourer. Where Born: Tamworth, Staffordshire. Last or Usual Address: Cow Hill, Chaderton. Religion: Ch. Education: N. Married + 3 children. English. Wt in: 11 st 3 lbs  Wt out: 11 st 0 lbs Marks etc: Bald, cut back of left hand, cut right of upper lip, mole right of neck. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: April 30/66 Removed to Wakefield.

Henry Smith married Mary Davis's mother about 11 years previously, when she was aged 8 and attending a charity school. When she was 15 she left the school and went to live with her mother and step father in Oldham. Soon after, with the mother's consent, Smith began to have improper intimacy with her. He continued his intimacy with her until she had a child by him. After the birth she went into service with a view to escaping from him. In May of this year Smith discovered where Mary was living and promptly resumed his annoyance. On the 18th May he applied for a bed at the Bull's Head, Oldham. When the landlady, Mrs A Mills refused his request, Smith threatened to murder her. He still continued to visit Mary and she threatened to leave and hide in the country. Smith stated that he would find her and kill her if she did not go to live with him.

On the night of 6th June, Smith was met by a Mrs Higgins who was known to him. She inquired if he was in a better mood than he was the previous day. he replied that he was not and that someone's would be shortened that night. Directly after  that he called in at the Bull's head and gained access to the scullery where Mary was working. He asked her to fetch him a pint of ale. She did not comply. He thereupon placed one of his hands over over her mouth and with the other drew a sharp implement twice across her throat, exposing the wind pipe. In the struggle the girl's hands were badly cut. Two men who were in another part of the pub heard Mary's screams and on entering the room found Smith standing over the girl who was on the floor. Smith was taken into custody and Mary was confined to bed for several days, but owing to the position of the wounds she sustained no lasting injury.

The Jury found him guilty and the Judge said that Smith had attempted one of the most odious crimes, and that from the basest of all motives. It was not due to any forbearance or change of purpose that death had not been the result. If it had of been, nothing would have saved him from the gallows. The sentence was that he should be kept in penal servitude for 20 years.

"AGAINST THE ORDER OF NATURE"

Abraham GIBBONS (Calendar No 76 in same case). When Received: April 18th 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Having on 17th April 1866 feloniously, wickedly + against the order of nature, casually known each other with each other, committed + perpetrated the abominable sin of buggery at Manchester. Sentence: 10 Years Penal Servitude (sentence commuted to 18 Cal Mths Hard Labour. Age: 18. Ht: 5ft 3 ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Sandy, Grey. Trade or Profession: Printer. Where Born: Manchester, Lancashire. Last or Usual Address: Frost Ct, Hart St, Manchester. Religion: D. Education: R + W Imp. Single. English. Both Parents Living. Wt in: 8 st 4 lbs. Wt out: 8 st 2 lbs. Marks etc: Mole left cheek, 2 small moles left arm. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Aug 31/66 Removed to Wakefield and subsequently received back Set 6/66. Discharged Jan 25/68.

6679. Ellis OLDHAM (Calendar No 43 in same case).When Received:  April 18th 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Having on 17th April 1866 feloniously, wickedly + against the order of nature, casually known each other with each other, committed + perpetrated the abominable sin of buggery at Manchester. Sentence: 10 Years Penal Servitude. Age: 45. Ht: 5ft 8 ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Sallow, Brown, Brown. Trade or Profession: Weaver. Where Born: Stockport, Cheshire. Last or Usual Address: Thomas St, Manchester. Religion: Ch. Education: R + W Imp. Widower + 2 children. English. Wt in: 8 st 2 lbs. Wt out: 8 st 2 lbs. Marks etc: Scar left of forehead, blue scar corner of right eye, 2 cuts on nose, 5th finger right hand crooked. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Aug 31/66 Removed to Wakefield.

As was usual in such cases the newspapers gave little coverage to this trial. All that was noted was was that Ellis Oldham,49 and Abraham Gibbons, 18 were indicted for a felony in Manchester on April 17th. The Jury found both guilty but recommended that the younger one be shown mercy. Each was sentenced to 10 Years Penal Servitude and the Judge stated that he would recommend to the proper quarter that Gibbons should be shown mercy. His sentence was later reduced.

DOUBLE TWENTY - CHARGE AGAINST AN EX-CONVICT

7664. Joseph BERRY. When Received:  Nov 15th 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Charged with having been transported beyond the seas for the time of twenty years in pursuance of certain judgements against him for felony, + without lawful cause or excuse on Oct 31/66 before the [period] of said 20 years, was at large at Bury. Sentence: 20 Years Penal Servitude + previously thereto, he be imprisoned in the House of Correction at Salford for one week. Age: 42. Ht: 5ft 4 ½ ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Greyish, Hazel. Trade or Profession: Labourer. Where Born: Bury, Lancashire. Last or Usual Address: Rock St, Bury. Religion: Ch. Education: N. Single. English. Marks etc: Cut on right cheek, left arm crooked, large mole left breast. Previous Committal: 20 Years from Liverpool [unreadable] Assizes 1856 as Joph. Berry. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Jan 11/67 Removed to Wakefield.

Joseph Berry, 47 was charged with having returned from transportation before the expiration of his imprisonment. Berry had been convicted of robbery at Liverpool Assizes in 1856 and sentenced to twenty years' transportation. On 31st August this year Berry had been found at Bury and was taken into custody.

In his defence the prisoner stated that he had been transported to New South Wales and after serving several years he received a ticket of leave [a form of parole]. After three years on the ticket he  then received a conditional pardon. He stated that he had lost his papers in a hurricane in the Bay of Bengal, whilst on a voyage to India. He was subsequently engaged as a ship's cook and came to England. He was not aware that by doing so he was committing an offence.

The Judge in his summing up said that if Berry had received a conditional pardon it did would not have justified him in returning to England. The Jury found him guilty. In passing sentence the Judge recommended that the prisoner to make a representation to the Home Office, and that if the statement he had made was found to be true, the sentence that the Court was about to pass would be remitted. The original sentence was that of twenty years' penal servitude, and it would be his duty to pass a sentence of the same term, beginning at the present time.

 

JERSEY STREET OUTRAGE

7747. Joseph RODGERS. When Received:  Sept 28th 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Having on the 26th Sept 1866. Feloniously killed + slain one William Lee at Manchester. Sentence: 10 Years Penal Servitude. Age: 19. Ht: 5ft 4 ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Brown, Grey. Trade or Profession: Factory Operative. Where Born: Manchester, Lancashire. Last or Usual Address: 22 Poland St, Manchester. Religion: RC. Education: R. Single. English. Wt in: 8 st 7 lbs. Wt out: 8 st 7 lbs. Marks etc: Several blue dots + anchor on left arm. Previous Committals: 4 (at City Gaol). When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Dec 26/66 Removed to Millbank.

7748. Henry HOLLAND. When Received: Sept 28th 1866. Offence and Where Committed:  Having on the 26th Sept 1866. Feloniously killed + slain one William Lee at Manchester Sentence: 15 Years Penal Servitude. Age: 20. Ht: 5ft 7 ¼ ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Red, Blue. Trade or Profession: Driller. Where Born: Manchester, Lancashire. Last or Usual Address: 106 Long St, Manchester. Religion: RC. Education: R. Married + 0 children. English. Wt in: 9 st 10 lbs. Wt out: 9 st 9 lbs. Marks etc: 2 moles on left cheek, lost 2 upper teeth, pockmark near right temple. Previous Committals: 2 (at City Gaol). When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Dec 26/66 Removed to Millbank.

7749. John GLENNING. When Received: Sept 28th 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Having on the 26th Sept 1866. Feloniously killed + slain one William Lee at Manchester. Sentence: Acquitted. Age: 20. Ht: 5ft 4 ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Brown, Hazel. Trade or Profession: Labourer. Where Born: Manchester, Lancashire. Last or Usual Address: 47 Queen St, Manchester. Religion: RC. Education: R + W Imp. Single. English. Wt in: 8 st 7 lbs. Wt out: 8 st 7 lbs. Marks etc: 4 scars left + 2 scars right of forehead, scar right cheek, cut on right eyebrow. Previous Committals: 5. 2 Years at Lancaster Gaol 1863 + City Gaol Manchester. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Dec 8/66.

7750. Thomas CRAVEN. When Received: Sept 28th 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Having on the 26th Sept 1866. Feloniously killed + slain one William Lee at Manchester. Sentence: Acquitted. Age: 18. Ht: 5ft 5 ½ ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Pale, Lt Brown, Grey. Trade or Profession: Factory Operative. Where Born: Manchester, Lancashire. Last or Usual Address: Bakers Court, Cotton St, Manchester. Religion: RC. Education: R. Single. English. Wt in: 8 st 7 lbs. Wt out: 8 st 7 lbs. Marks etc:  Scar centre + right of forehead, scar on right eyebrow, large cut on right thumb, scar on back. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Dec 8/66.

7751. John DORNING. When Received:  Oct 1st 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Feloniously killed + slain one William Lee at Manchester. Sentence: 18 cal mths Hard labour. Age: 18. Ht: 5ft 0 ¾ ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Sallow, Brown, Grey. Trade or Profession: Factory Operative. Where Born: Manchester, Lancashire. Last or Usual Address: Adam St, George Leigh St, Manchester. Religion: RC. Education: R. Single. English. Wt in: 8 st 11 lbs. Wt out: 8 st 8 lbs. Marks etc: Large cut left of forehead, cut left eyebrow, large scar back of left hand. Previous Committals: 3 at City Gaol. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: June 2/68.

7752. Joseph SLOANE. When Received:  Oct 1st 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Feloniously killed + slain one William Lee at Manchester.  Sentence: 5 Years Penal Servitude. Age: 22. Ht: 5ft 3 ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Brown, Hazel. Trade or Profession: Factory Operative. Where Born: Manchester, Lancashire. Last or Usual Address: 94 George Leigh St, Manchester. Religion: Ch. Education: R + W Imp. Married + 1 child. English. Wt in: 7 st 10 lbs. Wt out: 7 st 6 lbs. Marks etc: 2nd 3rd toes on each foot webbed together, scar right of forehead, mole on throat. Previous Committals: 1 at city Gaol. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Jan 11/67 Removed to Pentonville.

Joseph Rodgers, Henry Holland, John Glenning, Thomas Craven, John Dorning, Joseph Sloane and Richard McCreedy were charged with the manslaughter of William Lee, self acting minder in Manchester on 26th September. Mr Hopwood and Mr West prosecuted. Mr Higgin defended Rodgers and Dorning. Mr Jones defended Holland, McCreedy, Sloane and Craven, whilst Mr Cobbett defended Glenning.

On 26th September a boatman called Jewell was walking along Jersey St, Ancoats with a horse. His wife was following a few paces behind. As they walked down the street a large number of men came out of one of the local beerhouses. One of them, Rodgers grabbed Mrs Jewell by the neck and then ran away. Not liking this rough treatment she chased after him for a few yards. When she had nearly caught up with him in an adjoining street, he turned round and took off his coat as if he was going to fight her. Wisely she turned round and rejoined her husband in Jersey St. Rodgers and some other men followed her. The men gathered around the horse and started to jostle it, one jumped on its back, whilst some of the others assaulted Mr Jewell.

At this point William Lee arrived on the scene and tried to remonstrate with the gang, telling them to leave the man and his horse alone. The youth on the horse head butted Lee and Rodgers knocked him down. When Lee got up Holland knocked him down again. Dorning jumped down from the horse onto Lee neck. A large gang gathered round the prostrate Lee and kicked him violently until he was nearly dead.

Jewell had gone to fetch a Policeman, but as many assailants as there were present they were not brave enough to face a single constable and they ran off. Lee was left on the floor and died shortly afterwards in the arms of a woman who went to lift up his head. Rodgers was arrested almost right away and the others were subsequently apprehended later.

After the evidence had been presented to the Jury, the Judge summed up. He stated that although the death of Lee had been caused by one particular kick, if all the prisoners had been parties to the unlawful violence, with the intention that Lee should be beaten, all were guilty of manslaughter. He pointed out that there might be a difference in the amount of activity by each of the prisoners, but the Court would have to take this into account, if they were found guilty, when sentencing the prisoners.

The Judge read out the main parts of the evidence against the prisoners and directed the Jury to acquit Glenning and Craven. The Jury was sent out and after only five minutes returned to the court, acquitting Glenning and Craven and finding the other prisoners guilty.

In passing sentence the Judge said that the men had been found guilty of manslaughter. Their guilt differed in degree, but it was plain that a large number of rough bad characters went out into the street for the purpose of assaulting quiet and peaceable people. They assault Jewell and his wife and kicked the unfortunate Lee so as to cause his death. The evidence showed that it was Holland who inflicted the severe kick that cause Lee’s death. The Judge sentenced him to fifteen years penal servitude. Rodgers did not inflict such a kick but was one of the most active people in the affray. He was sentenced to ten years. Sloane and McCreedy had also kicked the deceased whilst he was on the ground, but they had not taken as active part as Holland. They received five years each. Finally the Judge stated that although Dorning part in the crime had not been as bad as the others, he had been party to the assault. He did not think that they was any evidence to show that Dorning had kicked Lee while he was on the ground, and therefore he would be sentenced as though the man had not been deprived of his life. The sentence of the Court upon Dorning was 18 months imprisonment.

"ABOMINABLE CRIME"

7759. James HEYES. When Received:  Oct 11th 1866. Offence and Where Committed: having on the 7th Oct 1866 feloniously + wilfully committed an abominable crime at Manchester. Sentence: 10 Years Penal Servitude. Age: 40. Ht: 5ft 4 ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Pale, Brown, Grey. Trade or Profession: Tailor. Where Born: [Crome], Limmerick. Last or Usual Address: 19 Ledger St, Manchester. Religion: RC. Education: N. Married + 5 children. Irish. Wt in: 9 st 10 lbs. Wt out: 9 st 10 lbs. Marks etc: Cut left of forehead, cut on + over left eyebrow. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Dec 26/66 Removed to Millbank.

7760. Thomas KENNY. When Received:  Oct 11th 1866. Offence and Where Committed: having on the 7th Oct 1866 feloniously + wilfully committed an abominable crime at Manchester. Sentence: 10 Years Penal Servitude. Age: 22. Ht: 5ft 5 ½ ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Pale, Brown, Blue. Trade or Profession: Porter. Where Born: St Helens, Lancashire. Last or Usual Address: Hanover St, Manchester. Religion: RC. Education: N. Single. English. Wt in: 9 st 10 lbs. Wt out: 9 st 9 lbs. Marks etc: Left arm crooked, scar left eyebrow, blue spot left cheekbone. Previous Committals: 3 City Gaol. Register in next case: 8463. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Dec 26/66 Removed to Millbank.

 As yet I have not been able to find any reports of this case. See below.

ACQUITTAL

7761. Humphrey STEVENSON. When Received:  Oct 15th 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Having feloniously + wilfully + unlawfully killed + slain Mary Brennan at Manchester. Sentence: Acquitted. Age: 19. Ht: 5ft 5 ¼ ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Sallow, Brown, Grey. Trade or Profession: Labourer. Where Born: Manchester, Lancashire. Last or Usual Address: 22 Little John St, Manchester. Religion: Ch. Education: R + W Imp. Single. Both Parents Living. English. Wt in:  9 st 12 lbs. Wt out: 9 st 12 lbs. Marks etc:  Cut right of forehead, cut corner of left eye. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Dec 11/66.

The Manchester Guardian reported that Humphrey Stevenson, 19, the bill [of Indictment] against whom the Grand Jury ignored, was charged on a coroner's inquisition with the manslaughter of Mary Brennan. No evidence was offered against the prisoner, and the Jury were directed to find a verdict of acquittal.

NO REPORTS

7768. Edward BRANNAN. When Received:  Oct 25th 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Having on the 19th Oct 1866 feloniously + wilfully assaulted Harriet Gibson + against her will feloniously did ravish + casually know her + with stealing 1 pawn ticket + 2 candlesticks &c her property. Sentence: 20 Years Penal Servitude. Age: 18. Ht: 5ft 5 ½ ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Sallow, grey, Brown. Trade or Profession: Moulder. Where Born: Manchester, Lancashire. Last or Usual Address: 26 Strand St, Manchester. Religion: RC. Education: R + W Imp. Single. English. Wt in: 8 st 1 lbs. Wt out: 7 st 10 lbs. Marks etc: Cut centre of forehead, cut right of forehead, blue scar under left eye. Previous Committals: 5 at City Gaol. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Jan 11/67 Removed to Millbank.

7769. Thomas WILSON. When Received:  Oct 25th 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Having on the 19th Oct 1866 feloniously + wilfully assaulted Harriet Gibson + against her will feloniously did ravish + casually know her + with stealing 1 pawn ticket + 2 candlesticks &c her property.  Sentence: Acquitted. Age: 20. Ht: 5ft 5 ¼ ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Brown, Grey. Trade or Profession: Sailor. Where Born: Manchester, Lancashire. Last or Usual Address: 44 Gartside St, Manchester. Religion: RC. Education: R + W Imp. Single. English. Wt in: 9 st 13 lbs. Wt out: 9 st 13 lbs. Marks etc: JC, heart, RW, JW, Anchor, 7 blue dots + other blue marks left arm, 3 pockmarks between eyebrows, ring 2nd finger left hand. Previous Committals: 3 at City Gaol. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Dec 8/66.

I searched through all the reports of these Assizes and could not find any mention of the above case or the case involving  Heyes and Kenny. I think the explanation is that on  December 10th the Manchester Guardian wrote that: " During the greater part of the day the Court was engaged disposing cases that are unfit for publication."

7841. Michael McCREADY. When Received:  Dec 5th 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Having on the 26th Nov 1866 feloniously killed + slain one William Lee at Manchester. Sentence: 5 Years Penal Servitude. Age: 21. Ht: 5ft 3 ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Pale, Sandy, Grey. Trade or Profession: Spinner. Where Born: Manchester, Lancashire. Last or Usual Address:  4 George Leigh St, Manchester. Religion: Ch. Education: R + W Imp. Single. English. Wt in: 9 st 4 lbs. Wt out: 9 st 4 lbs. Marks etc: Small cut left of upper lip, small mole middle + left of chin, cut between 4th + 5th finger left hand. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Jan 11/67 Removed to Pentonville.

See the Jersey Street Outrage. Although convicted at the same trial McCready was arrested some time after the other men who were also involved in the trial.


MAD FATHER MURDERS SON

8109. Henry PARKER. When Received:  Jan 7th 1867. Offence and Where Committed: On the 7th Jan 1867 did feloniously wilfully + of his malice aforethought killed + slain one Samuel Parker. Sentence: To be kept in custody until Her Majesty’s pleasure be known. Age: 50. Ht: 5ft 5 ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Brown, Grey. Trade or Profession: Labourer. Where Born: Burley, Otley, Yorkshire. Last or Usual Address: Ordsall lane, Salford. Religion: Ch. Education: R + W Well. Married + 6 children. English. Wt in: 9 st 4 lbs. Wt out: 9 st 4 lbs. Marks etc: Scar back of neck, 5th finger each hand crooked, cut knuckle 2nd finger left hand. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Apr 8/67 Removed to Broadmoor Criminal Lunatic Asylum.

Henry Parker was a labourer living at 60 Ordsall Lane, Salford. He was accused of murdering his son Samuel Parker aged 7. For some time prior to the murder Parker had complained about being short of money owing to the fact that he had seven children. He had also lost a sum of money in connection with his job as a lurryman.

Shortly before six o’clock on the morning of 7th January 1867 he took his son Samuel from his bed in which another son was also sleeping. He went downstairs with the child and then slit his throat with a razor. The wound he inflicted caused death in a few minutes.

The elder brother with whom Samuel was sleeping with was unaware that his brother had been taken from his bed. At about 6.15 Parker’s wife went downstairs and discovered the horrible crime. The elder brother, John was called down by his mother and discovered the body of the boy lying in a pool of blood in the scullery. John asked his father what he had been thinking about. He replied, “I cannot tell you what I was thinking about. It would have been better undone”.

Whatever Parker had been thinking about at the time of the murder, the wound inflicted upon the child was savage. He had cut the boy’s throat on the left side, about an inch above the collar bone, inflicting a wound three inches long and about one and a half inches wide. He had almost severed the vertebra.

At the trial, Parker pleaded not guilty, however none of the above facts were disputed. He was described as being well educated, feeble looking old man, who was meanly dressed.

Parker had been employed by the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Company as a lurryman (sic). Unfortunately two years prior to the crime he lost a parcel from his lurry(sic) and was subsequently sacked from his position.

Witnesses from the church Parker attended stated since he had lost his job he had been suffering from delusions. It was also stated that he had lost all sense of reason.

Soon afterwards he was able to get a job with the Old Quay Company which was not so well paid. However he had two sons working and their joint earnings came to two guineas a week. The house the family lived in was rented and the weekly rent was 5s 6d, so financially the family were comfortable. In addition to this Parker also had some shares and regularly received dividends of nearly £500.

Parker seemed to be fond of his children, and those that did not work were regularly sent to school. He regularly attended a Wesleyan chapel and had been well thought of by other members of the congregation, but since he had lost his job at the railway company his behaviour had been that a man who had lost his way. He was filled with the dread of impending ruin. No one could persuade him that this was not the case. He even stopped eating full meals on the grounds that there was not enough food for the rest of the family. Some time in 1865 he complained to one person that he was going to ruin. He stated that his wife did not manage well and that the children did not get enough to eat. He feared the family would end up in the workhouse. The person he had spoken to Alderman Davies who by now was convinced that Parker was not of sound mind. Other witnesses were of a similar opinion.

A few weeks before the murder, Parker’s behaviour became so strange that a neighbour had started to take an axe with him to bed just in case he had to break in and rescue the children. However none of the people who had noticed his decline had bothered to inform the authorities.

Before the defence had had time to complete their case, the Jury intervened and found Parker not guilty on the grounds of insanity. The Judge intimated that he thought the verdict was a proper one. The Judge ordered that Parker should be detained until Her Majesty’s pleasure been known. (More details about the criminally insane to follow later.)

He was removed to Broadmoor Criminal Asylum on April 8th 1867.

Continued here.


 

RETURN TO THE TOP OF THE PAGE

THE MANCHESTER COLLECTION

GENES REUNITED

 

CONTACT MFHR AT:

mail@manchester-family-history-research.co.uk


Copyright: Gerard Lodge (www.manchester-family-history-research.co.uk)2007-2017

All Rights Reserved

Do Not Reproduce Any Material Without The Prior Permission Of The Author.

Last update: 16th January 2017