THE MANCHESTER FELONY REGISTER PART ONE - Extracts include  murder, beastiality and accounts of bent pins and poison.
 

 

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MANCHESTER FAMILY HISTORY RESEARCH

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CONTENTS

HOMEPAGE

A  MANCHESTER RESEARCHER'S TALE

MANCHESTER AND STOCKPORT CERTIFIED INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS

MANCHESTER COURT RECORDS

BELLE VUE PRISON RECORDS

NEW BAILEY PRISON RECORDS

STRANGEWAYS PRISON RECORDS

STRANGEWAYS PRISON: FIRST REPORTS

MANCHESTER MARTYRS' PRISON RECORDS

PRESS REACTION TO THE MANCHESTER EXECUTIONS PART I

PART II

PART III

WHAT  DID HAPPEN TO THE REMAINS OF THE PRISONERS EXECUTED AT MANCHESTER?

THE MANCHESTER FELONY REGISTER PT 1

PART 2

PART 3

PART 4

GREATER MANCHESTER RIOTS IN 1868

MANCHESTER AND LANCASHIRE STRAYS IN MILL BANK PRISON

MANCHESTER POOR LAW AND WORKHOUSE RECORDS

MANCHESTER POOR LAW UNION MINUTES

CHORLTON AND SOUTH MANCHESTER REGISTRATION DISTRICT

VOTING REGISTERS AND ELIGIBILITY IN MANCHESTER

1831 POPULATION FIGURES FOR MANCHESTER

MANCHESTER CENSUS COLLECTION DETAILS

PLACES OF WORSHIP IN MANCHESTER AND SALFORD

MANCHESTER PARISH AND CITY

MANCHESTER CITY CENTRE CHURCHES

MANCHESTER AND GENERAL INFORMATION

MANCHESTER BOROUGH POLICE FORCE

SECOND PART

THIRD PART

FOURTH PART

MANCHESTER INQUESTS WITNESS STATEMENTS INDEX

TRANSPORT IN MANCHESTER PART ONE

PART TWO

USEFUL LINKS

MANCHESTER FAMILY HISTORY CONTACT PAGE

   

 
MANCHESTER FAMILY HISTORY RESEARCH

THE MANCHESTER FELONY REGISTER

Manchester Archives have launched The Manchester Collection via Find My Past  the records from this prison. Many examples from this site were used in the publicity  packs and blogs etc to announce this launch.
For other material also see Genes Reunited

EXTRACTS FROM THE SURVIVING FELONY PRISON REGISTER OF MANCHESTER AND SALFORD

 PART ONE

MANY books have been written covering the topic of those people who were executed in the New Bailey and Strangeways prisons, but apart from about a very few, not a lot has been recorded about those convicted murderers who were not executed. I will attempt to do that here and also record details of some of the more notorious characters who were tried for murder, manslaughter, rape and other such horrendous crimes, who were incarcerated in the two prisons during the period from 1864 to 1876 and whose details are recorded in the surviving Felony Register. Also included are some crimes which would not be considered as such today, or crimes which were punished beyond all reasonable thinking.

I have used this register, which covered the latter part of the existence of the New Bailey Prison and the early period of Strangeways Prison as the starting source for this research.  It contains a wealth of detail including the physical descriptions of the prisoners, something that you will not find in the Census Returns. This register is held by Manchester Archives (reference M600/4/1 and 1a). I have also used contemporary reports from the Manchester local newspapers including The Manchester Guardian and the Manchester Courier.

Reporting of court cases seems to have been slightly strange. Cases that I would expect to have had blanket coverage got barely a mention. Others cases that were deemed to be “unspeakable crimes” were reported as being felonies with no details given. It appears that Home Office guidelines were laid down in the 1820s to prevent the press from publishing reports of such matters.

On the 22nd May 1787 the chairman of the Quarter sessions laid a memorial stone marking the building of the gaol and penitentiary-house (at the expense of the hundred of Salford in the county palatine of Lancaster). Not the snappiest of names, thankfully the gentleman who laid the stone was called Thomas Butterworth Bayley and in time the prison was known as the New Bailey.

The prison closed in late June 1868. The prisoners were transferred over a period of a few days into the newly constructed Strangeways Gaol. It was also decided that the new prison would in its name need to reflect that it was the prison for Lancashire as well as the Salford Hundred and it was therefore called The County Prison or the Hundred of Salford. Thankfully in time, the name was shortened to Strangeways, however in some Census returns it was referred to as Cheetham Prison.

Prior to 1835 the Lancashire Assizes Courts, which tried capital and other serious offences which were too serious for the Quarter Sessions, took place at Lancaster. In 1835 the Assize Courts for the Hundreds of West Derby and Salford were moved to Liverpool. On July 26th 1864 the first ever separate Assizes for the Salford Hundred took place in Manchester. The newspapers of the day referred to these assizes in the various guises of the Manchester Assizes, the South Lancashire Assizes and even the Crown court.

The first execution, that of James Burrows, took place at the New Bailey on August 25th 1864. However as early as 1864 murderers and those convicted of manslaughter were locked up (initially) in the New Bailey.

The charges listed in the register were the ones that the prisoners were arrested for and were not necessarily the charges they were actually tried upon. Register numbers are not consequential as these entries numbers are taken from the general registers. Once the number reached 10,000 the count was started again from 1.

From July 1870, the records often included the prisoners’ next of kin and sometimes their address also.

9969. William WHITE. When Received:  May 17 1864. Offence and Where Committed: Charged with manslaughter in killing + slaying of Ethelinda Royle at Ashton Under Lyne. Sentence: 2 Cal(endar) Mths Hard Labour. Age: Last April 30 1/12. Ht: 5ft 9 ¼ ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Sallow, Brown, Blue. Trade or Profession: Spinner. Where Born: Ramsbottom. Last or Usual Address: Turner Lane, Ashton. Religion: Ch(urch). Education: R(eads) + W(rites) Imp(erfectly). Married + 1 child. English. Marks etc: Pockpitted, scar back of left wrist, cut 1st + 2nd finger left hand. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Sept 24/64 .

William White was indicted for the manslaughter of Ethelinda Royle. Mr Kay was the prosecutor and Mr Ernest Jones acted for the prisoner. Royle lodged in Turner Lane, Ashton and on the day of the incident she had quarrelled with White and another man about them standing in her garden. White kicked Royle on the back and she in turn picked a brush to attack him. White then kicked her twice in the abdomen. One of these kicks ruptured a small intestine. Sadly the woman died the following morning.

The witness for the prosecution admitted that the deceased woman was very quarrelsome and that White had been extremely provoked. Nevertheless the Jury found White guilty as charged. In passing sentence the Judge stated that the deceased had appeared to be greatly to blame and that her conduct would have provoked almost any man. The prisoner had already served two months’ imprisonment, so the sentence would be a light one, namely two months.

BENT PINS AND POISON - AS FEAUTURED IN THE MANCHESTER COLLECTION

88. Cyrus TRAVIS. When Received:  May 26 1864. Offence and Where Committed: On May 12/64 feloniously attempted to murder Ellen Travis by giving her cakes containing antimony and crooked pins at Prestwich. Sentence: 20 Years Penal Servitude. Age: About 43. Ht: 5ft 7 ½ ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Brown, Hazel. Trade or Profession: Hawker. Where Born: Newton. Last or Usual Address: Oliver St, Manchester. Religion: D(issenter). Education: R + W Imp. Married + 1 child. English. Marks etc: Small scar top of forehead, lost front upper teeth, very slightly pockpitted. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Aug 25/64 Removed to Wakefield.

Cyrus Travis was indicted for administering a cake containing bent pins and antimony to his wife Ellen at Prestwich Asylum on 12th May with intent to murder her. The prisoner’s wife was an inmate of the Asylum. On the day in question the prisoner went to see her and give her some oranges and a piece of pastry called a puff. He told her to put these in her pocket. Shortly after he had finished the visit, his wife and a woman called Downs, broke the puff and found it contained seven pins bent like fish hooks. When she tasted the puff Mrs Travis noticed that it had a “disagreeable” taste. When it was analysed it was found to contain tartarised antimony. About a third of the cake was analysed and the antimony in it was found to contain about one and a half grains of metallic antimony. When the prisoner was taken into custody, two grains of tartarised antimony were found in his waistcoat pocket.

The prisoner stated that he thought that his wife would never leave the asylum, and that he should marry again. He stated that he had two women in mind and that he was sure one of them would marry him.

The Jury found him guilty. The Judge stated that the Jury had found him guilty of a very bad crime, attempting to take away the life of his wife by poisoning her. He did not succeed in that object, because by introducing the bent pins into the cake, as well as the poison, it was providentially discovered. The moral guilt was precisely the same as if succeeded in his wicked and deadly object. The sentence of the Court was that he was to be kept in Penal Servitude for 20 years.

INDUSTRIAL CRIME?

909. William SLATER. When Received:  Aug 25 1864. Offence and Where Committed: On Aug 3/64 feloniously + maliciously did wound + cause grievous bodily harm to Thos Wild with intent to maim + disable him at Reddish. Sentence: 20 Years Penal Servitude. Age: Last Oct 24. Ht: 5ft 10 ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Brown, Blue. Trade or Profession: Brickmaker. Where Born: Withington. Last or Usual Address: Bramhall Lane, Stockport.. Religion: Ch. Education: R + W Imp. Married + 2 children. English. Marks etc: Cut left of forehead, cut 1st finger left hand. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Dec 20/64 Removed to Wakefield.

910. Holland CHEETHAM. When Received:  Aug 25 1864. Offence and Where Committed: On Aug 3/64 feloniously + maliciously did wound + cause grievous bodily harm to Thos Wild with intent to maim + disable him at Reddish. Sentence: 20 Years Penal Servitude. Age: Last July 30 1/12. Ht: 5ft 11 ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Brown, Hazel. Trade or Profession: Brickmaker. Where Born: Stockport. Last or Usual Address: Burnage Lane, Burnage.. Religion: Ch. Education: R + W Imp. Married + 1 child. English. Marks etc: Small blue dot on nose, cut left eye, scar on left arm + right arm. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Dec 21/64 Removed to Wakefield.

William Slater and Holland Cheetham were charged on the 3rd of August with having maliciously and feloniously wounding Thomas Wild with intent to cause hem grievous bodily harm. Mr Pope and Mr Addison prosecuted, whilst Mr Ernest Jones and Mr Cottingham defended Slater. Mr Torr and Mr Edwards defended Cheetham.

Mr Thomas Meadows, a brickmaker stated that he was contracted in March to make bricks for Messrs Holdsworth’s mill at Reddish, near Stockport. From that date he had employed a number of men to make bricks. In June there was a turnout (strike) of twenty six men, including Thomas Wild. It was the union men who turned out, the non union men continued to work.

The cause of the strike was over the use of a brick pressing machine. The men were on strike for about a month. Thomas Wild and two other men returned to work before the others. Cheetham at some time approached Thomas Meadows and stated that the other men would return to work if Wild and the two other men were sacked. Mr Meadows refused to sack the three men, however the other men did return to work.

On the 2nd of August Thomas Wild was on the night shift. He came on duty at 6.00 pm and was due to guard the brickyard until 3.00 pm the next day. The other men had finished work at 8.00 pm that same night. At midnight wild was attacked by six men including Cheetham and Slater. The men want to know the whereabouts of the brick presser, the machine to which they objected. When Wild would not tell where it was, Cheetham stuck him with a piece of wood beneath the eye, which knocked him down. Slater held him down while the others kicked and punched him. One man hit him about six times with a heavy piece of wood on the arms, shoulders and legs. He was beaten by the men for about a quarter of hour and was in danger of losing his life.

The trial was quite a complex one, with the prosecution indicating that this was an offence born out of the Union men being against the introduction of the brick pressing machine.  The Jury only took about half an hour to find both the men guilty. Cheetham protested that he was innocent.

In passing sentence, the Judge stated that he was bound by the decision of the Jury, who on the evidence before them, were justified in their decision. The offence was a very serious one, and when Trade Unions interfered with the liberty of others, the law rendered it a most dangerous offence. If Wild had died, and the prisoners had been found guilty of murder, they would have been executed. The man, however did not die, but the offence was a most serious one. He sentenced them to 20 years Penal Servitude.

DEATH SENTENCE COMMUTED

2061. William HAMILTON. When Received:  Jan 10th 1865.  Offence and Where Committed: On Jan 2/65 Feloniously wilfully + of his malice aforethought killed and murdered Taylor Tilley at Manchester. Sentence: DEATH. Commuted by Her Majesty to Penal Servitude for his natural life. Age: Last Aug 35 5/12. Ht: 5ft 6 ½ ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Lt Brown, Grey. Trade or Profession: Warehouseman. Where Born: Dublin. Last or Usual Address: 22 Liverpool St, Salford. Religion: Ch. Education: R + W well. Married + 5 children. Irish. Marks etc: Cut on right throat and left of forehead. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: April 15/65 Removed to Wakefield.

Taylor Tilley was the keeper of the Globe Inn, Birchin Lane, Manchester. On the night of 2nd January Hamilton and another man were having “words” in the tap room of the inn, subsequently he challenge the other man to a fight in the street. A few minutes later Tilley saw Hamilton with a knife in his hand. He asked him to put the knife down or hand it to him. Hamilton refused and Tilley tried to grab the knife. After a brief struggle Hamilton stabbed Tilley in the belly. Tilley was suffering from a wound in the abdomen about one and a half inches long from which the bowels protruded. He died the following night.

At the trial one of the witnesses, Robert Mather stated that Hamilton had drunk a couple of glasses of whiskey before the landlord appeared in the bar. Mather and a work colleague had paid for these drinks as Hamilton had no money. When Tilley came in Hamilton asked him if he could have a drink “on the slate”. Tilley refused but stated that he would give him a drink. Apparently it was the custom where he came from not to give “tick” on the first day of the year. Hamilton did not like the answer and pulled a pocket knife from his pocket.

Eventually the Jury found Hamilton guilty and he was sentenced to the Death Penalty. The sentence was later commuted to Penal Servitude for Life.

JEALOUS LOVER

2704. Michael GIBLIN. (alias John Jones, Michael Kenyon, Kiverly Kiverlin, John Kenny). When Received: April 4th 1865. Offence and Where Committed: On March 20/65 Feloniously Wilfully + of his malice aforethought killed + murdered Fanny Connor at Manchester. Sentence: 20 Years Penal Servitude. Age: About 31. Ht: 5ft 3 ¾ ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Brown, Grey. Trade or Profession: Weaver. Where Born: Manchester. Last or Usual Address: Wood St, Manchester. Religion: RC. Education: R + W Imp. Single. English Father. Irish. Marks etc: Cross + several blue dots on left arm, cut + scar left cheek, scar back of left hand, cut under right eye, scar under right ear. Previous Committals: 9 mths ago at City Gaol (2 mths). When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Sept 12/65 Removed to Millbank.

Michael Giblin alias Kelvin, 31 was charged with the murder of Fanny Connor on 30th March. The court heard that Giblin have lived with Connor for ten years. On about 25th January she left him and went to live with a man named Thomas Parr for a week. A month later she returned to Giblin. In the evening she went drinking in several inns and bars in the city. The last place she called in was a vault in Spinningfield where Parr was drinking. The two spoke and he coerced her into drinking some brandy. They stayed there till closing time. When they left the vault they went to a house in Little Quay St and picked up some ale on the way there.

As was the custom on reaching the house they placed a poker in the fire so that they could warm up the ale. After they had been there for some time, Giblin who had been made aware of their meeting, arrived at the house. He entered the room where he found them to be “engaging in familiarities” and then set upon Parr, stabbing him in the arm. After a brief struggle Parr managed to escape. Giblin then picked up the poker and hit Connor twice on the head. She fell to the floor and then holding the poker in both hands, hit her again several times.

Parr had gone for the police, and on returning to the house he and the police took Connor to the Royal Infirmary. The medical staff dressed her wounds as best as they were able. She lingered there for some hours but eventually died of pleurisy later that day. The medical evidence presented showed that this was as a result of receiving blows to the head from a blunt instrument.

Before her death Connor managed to give a statement to a Stipendiary Magistrate in which she stated that when she met Parr she was very drunk. Parr got her back to the house in Little Quay St by telling her that Giblin was there with another woman know as “Chick Mary”. In her statement she had also said they after her and Giblin had got back together, he had warned her that he would give her a “good licking” she would never get over if she went back to Parr.

The Judge summed up the evidence and told the Jury that if Giblin had entered the house with the intention to murder or inflict grievous bodily harm on Connor, then he was guilty of murder. However if Giblin had gone to the house in order to attack Parr and after being foiled in that attacked, and being provoked by finding Connor with Parr, he on a sudden impulse seized the poker, and struck her without intending serious injury, then the Jury may well see this as manslaughter.

The Jury after a short absence returned to the Court and found Giblin guilty of manslaughter. When asked if he had any to say before he was sentenced Giblin stated “I never had any thought of killing her”.

The Judge sentenced him to 20 Years penal servitude.

 

RAPES NOT FULLY REPORTED

4449. William Moses MOSCOP. When Received:  Sept 15th 1865. Offence and Where Committed: Violently assaulted on Sept 10/65 Sarah Pickering + against her will feloniously did ravish + casually know* at Salford. Sentence: 20 Years Penal Servitude. Age: Last Nov 25 11/12. Ht: 5ft 6 ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Brown, Grey. Trade or Profession: Labourer. Where Born: Crumpsall. Last or Usual Address: [Unreadable], Pendleton. Religion: Ch. Education: R. Single. English. Marks etc: Mole right cheek, cut on left thumb, scar centre of forehead. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Decd 19/65 Removed to Wakefield.

*Victorian euphemism for rape. [With the benefit of the Find My Past images which can be magnified greatly, it is possible that this phrase is "carnally know".]

The papers reported that this was the first case on the list to be heard. William Moses Moscop, 25 from Salford was charged with assaulting Sarah Pickering, 65  the wife of William Pickering of Pendleton. Moscop was employed by Salford Corporation as a lamplighter. It was claimed that Mrs Pickering was a woman on very intemperate habits. Very little else was reported about this crime. The Jury found Moscop guilty. Sentence was delayed until the end of the Assizes. On the 11th December in sentencing Moscop the Judge stated that this was the worst species of crime and duly sent him down for 20 Years Penal Servitude.

4469. Hugh OWEN. When Received:  Oct 26th 1865. Offence and Where Committed: Feloniously assaulted on the 18th Oct 1865 Rachael Farrar + against her will violently did ravish + casually know at Pilkington. Sentence: 20 Years Penal Servitude Age: Last June 28 4/12. Ht: 5ft 10 ½ ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Sallow, Brown, Grey. Trade or Profession: Labourer. Where Born: Bolton. Last or Usual Address: Wells Court, Bolton. Religion: Ch. Education: R. Married + 3 children. English. Marks etc: Pearl on left eye, cut right of forehead, cut left eyebrow, scar on right of lip. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Dec 19/65 Removed to Wakefield.

4470. William BLEAKLEY (convicted as Blakeley). Oct 26th 1865. Offence and Where Committed: Feloniously assaulted on the 18th Oct 1865 Rachael Farrar + against her will violently did ravish + casually know at Pilkington. Sentence: 20 Years Penal Servitude Age: Last July 23 9/12. Ht: 5ft 6 ¼ ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Red Brown. Trade or Profession: Iron Turner. Where Born: Little Bolton. Last or Usual Address: Mill Hill St, Little Bolton. Religion: Ch. Education: R. Single. English. Marks etc: Scar left of neck. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Dec 19/65 Removed to Wakefield.

Again this was a case that hardly got any column inches. The report just stated that Hugh Owen, 28 and William Bleakley, 23 were charged with Criminal Assault at Pilkington. They were sentenced to twenty years penal servitude. The Judge remarked that “10 ago they would have been left for execution”.

LOST CAT LEADS TO DEATH

5060. Stephen McEVOY. When Received:  Jan 4th 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Killing + slaying Jane Hamilton  (check) at Salford. Sentence: 6 Cal mths Hard Labour. Age: Last Feb 59 11/12. Ht: 5ft 6 ½ ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Sallow, Grey, Grey. Trade or Profession: Labourer. Where Born: Queens County. Last or Usual Address: 22 Rush St, Salford. Religion: RC. Education: Nil. Married + 2 children. Irish. Marks etc:  Lost greater part of upper teeth, mole on left cheek, small mole corner of right eye. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Sept 8/66.

Stephen McEvoy, 60 was accused of the manslaughter of Jane Headon on 4th December at Salford. Headon lived in Park Street, McEvoy was her neighbour. Headon owned a cat, which had gone missing. She and her husband were convinced that McEvoy had stolen it. On the evening of the 4th December Headon’s husband went to McEvoy’s house to enquire about the missing cat. McEvoy struck him on the head with a poker. Mrs Headon came to the house to take her injured husband home. As they were leaving the house McEvoy aimed another blow at the injured man, but he missed his target and struck Mrs Headon on the head with the poker.

Mrs Headon was taken to the Salford Dispensary where she had her wounds dressed. After she left the dispensary she continued with her life more or less as normal until 24th December when dangerous complications set in and she died on 28th December.

The defence questioned the evidence of Mrs Headon’s injuries and medical experts stated that the injuries might have been caused by banging her head against McEvoy’s door. The Jury found McEvoy guilty of manslaughter but recommended mercy on account of the provocation. The Judge stated that he had no doubt that McEvoy was exasperated by Headon’s conduct. He also said that he would take into account the Jury’s recommendation, but that it must be remembered that McEvoy had come to the door with a dangerous weapon in his hand and used it. People had to be taught that when they used such weapons there were responsible for all the consequences, even though they were not previously contemplated. Taking all the circumstances into consideration, the Judge stated that he would only sentence McEvoy to six month’s imprisonment.

MURDER IN MANCHESTER

5488. James McMANUS .When Received:  Dec 26th 1865. Offence and Where Committed: Having on the 24th Dec 1865 wilfully + of his malice aforethought killed + murdered one Thos Dowd at Manchester. Sentence: DEATH (Sentence commuted to Penal Servitude for Life.) Age: Last Feb 21 1/12. Ht: 5ft 6 ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Brown, Hazel. Trade or Profession: Comb Maker. Where Born: Manchester. Last or Usual Address: 5 Wellington Place, Golden St, Manchester. Religion: RC. Education: R. Married + 0 children. English.  Wt in: 10 st 0 lbs. Wt out: 10 st 0 lbs. Marks etc: Cut left of forehead in hair, scar left of neck, cut 2nd finger of left hand. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: May 25/66 Removed to Millbank.

James McManus, 21 was charged with the murder of Thomas Dowd in Manchester.  Margaret Smith, the wife of a coach driver, was the first witness for the prosecution. She stated that at about midnight on the 23rd December she was in Phillip’s Pork shop in Rochdale Rd with another woman called Catherine Langdon. McManus was also in the shop and made a derogatory remark to Mrs Smith, asking her if she was going to eat all that was in the shop. Her reply did not go down well with McManus who told her to mind her language. She again upset McManus who attempted to strike her, but he was thrown out of the shop before any harm came to the woman.

Mrs Smith left the shop shortly after and saw McManus with his girlfriend, a woman called Fallon, in the street. To avoid another quarrel she went back in the pork shop. A little later she left the shop again and met up with Thomas Dowd and Michael Langdon at the corner of the street, McManus was also present. Once again he tried to hit Mrs Smith and Thomas Dowd told McManus not to hit the woman. McManus promptly punched Dowd, who was prevented from punching back by Catherine Langdon. She had grabbed his jacket to stop him taking it off. By the time Dowd had got one arm free McManus had walked to the corner of the street where Ann Fallon was standing. He took off his jacket and gave it to her. McManus turned round and ran towards Dowd and stabbed in the thigh with an underhand blow. The cut led to a major loss of blood and the death of Dowd.

The crime was witnessed by several people and there was no doubt that McManus was guilty. Many of the witnesses stated that McManus was in "a state of drink". The defence claimed that:  Drunkenness was the very essence of this case and that drunkenness tended to lessen the control of a man had over his mind. Ill educated men had poor control at all times, but when they took drink their control was much lessened, and in many cases it was entirely removed. When that control was lost every symptom of insanity for the time appeared. It was, therefore, because drunkenness took away the power a man had over his passion that in such cases as this the only defence could be uncontrolled rage of the prisoner when he did the deed. The act could not be disputed; but the prisoner, though the killer , was not the murdered of Thomas Dowd. That was the only defence; and the Jury must reduce the graver charge to the lesser, and only find the prisoner guilty of manslaughter.

The Judge stated that there was no doubt that Dowd had died at the violent hand of McManus. The question was whether the injury inflicted by McManus, amounted in point of law, to the crime of murder, or whether the crime could be considered as manslaughter. The law presumed that the taking of a life was murder. Nevertheless, if the person who had committed the act did it under circumstances of provocation - if an outrage committed upon him roused his passion, and he, under the influence of that passion, before it had time to cool and before reason had time its place, did the act of violence - then that was manslaughter. Drunkenness was not excuse, in point of law, for any crime whatever. The law  did not make any allowances to an offender if he deprived himself of the proper governance of the moral powers of his facilities. He was equally criminal whether intoxicated or not; but if a man received provocation which aroused his passion, it was very material to consider whether he was sober or drunk. the passion of a man when drunk was more easily aroused. If a provocation threw a man into anger, and he committed a crime under the influence of that passion, so aroused, then he had the same excuse as a sober man would have if aroused to anger, although the same provocation might not  arouse a sober man as much as a drunken man. The Judge told the Jury, that if they believed the evidence given by the prosecution, there was nothing in point of law which reduced the crime to manslaughter, because provocation was not proved.

The Jury returned after half an hour with a verdict of guilty, but at the same time recommended mercy on account of McManus's age. Sentence of death was passed was passed in the usual form, but eventually commuted to Penal Servitude for Life.

BRIEFEST NOTICE – RAPE AND BEASTIALITY

5156. Jeremiah FARRINGTON. When Received:  18th June 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Violently assaulting on 16th Jan 1866 Agnes Balderstone + against her will feloniously did ravish + casually know at Bolton. Sentence: 10 Years Penal Servitude. Age: Last July 24 8/12. Ht: 5ft 9 ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Sallow, Dk Brown, Brown. Trade or Profession: Labourer. Where Born: Bolton. Last or Usual Address: Garden St, Bolton. Religion: Ch. Education: R + W Imp. Married + 1 child. English.  Marks etc: Cut on right eyebrow sandy whiskers, cut on 2nd finger left hand. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: Mar 31/66 Removed to Wakefield.

5498. John ALTY. When Received:  6th Feb 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Having on the 30th Jan 1866 feloniously wickedly + against the order of nature did casually know a certain pig + then feloniously did perpetrate an unnatural crime at Manchester. Sentence: 15 Cal Mths. Age: Last Aug 21 8/12. Ht: 5ft 5 ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Brown, Hazel. Trade or Profession: Labourer. Where Born: Manchester. Last or Usual Address: York St, Manchester. Religion: Ch. Education: R + W Imp. Single. English.  Wt in: 10 st 7 lbs. Wt out: 10 st 0 lbs. Marks etc: Scar right temple, scar right of mouth, small cut on left thumb. Previous Committals: 3 at City Gaol.  Register in Next case: 2856. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: June 8/67.

5506. John SCHORA. When Received:  16th Feb 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Having on the 11th Feb 1866 feloniously + violently assaulted Ellen Wait + then + there violently and against her will feloniously did  ravish + casually know her at Manchester. Sentence: 12 Years Penal Servitude. Age: Last Aug 23 3/12. Ht: 5ft 9 ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Sallow, Brown, Grey. Trade or Profession: Labourer. Where Born: Hulme. Last or Usual Address: Mill St, Manchester. Religion: R C. Education: R. Married + 0 children. English.  Wt in: 10 st 5 lbs. Wt out: 10 st 5 lbs. Marks etc: Scar on right cheek, small mole right arm. Ruptured. Previous Committals: 1 at City Gaol.  Register in Next case: 1735. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: April 26/66. Removed to Millbank.

5507. John COCHRANE. When Received:  16th Feb 1866. Offence and Where Committed: Having on the 11th Feb 1866 feloniously + violently assaulted Ellen Wait + then + there violently and against her will feloniously did  ravish + casually know her at Manchester. Sentence: 12 Years Penal Servitude. Age: Last Aug 22 5/12. Ht: 5ft 6 ½ ins. Complexion, Hair, Eyes: Fresh, Brown, Grey. Trade or Profession: Labourer. Where Born: Manchester. Last or Usual Address: Long St, Manchester. Religion: R C. Education: N. Single. English.  Wt in: 10 st 6 lbs. Wt out: 10 st 5 lbs. Marks etc: Scar under right jaw, cut on nose, blue mark above left elbow, several moles right arm. When Discharged or Otherwise Disposed: April 26/66. Removed to Millbank.

The newspapers did not report crimes such as these, even though attracted hefty sentences. The Manchester Guardian of March 15th 1886 printed the following non-report of these trials.

The whole of the day was occupied in the trial of cases the nature of which justifies only the briefest of notice.

John Schora and Thomas Cochrane were found guilty of a criminal assault in Manchester, and sentenced severally to 12 years’ penal servitude.

John Alty for an attempt to commit an unnatural crime in Manchester was sentenced to 15 months’ imprisonment.

Jeremiah Farrington was found guilty of a criminal assault at Bolton, and sentenced to ten years’ penal servitude.

Continued here.

Genes Reunited


 

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Last update: 16th January 2017