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CONTENTS

HOMEPAGE

A  MANCHESTER RESEARCHER'S TALE

MANCHESTER AND STOCKPORT CERTIFIED INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS

MANCHESTER COURT RECORDS

BELLE VUE PRISON RECORDS

NEW BAILEY PRISON RECORDS

STRANGEWAYS PRISON RECORDS

STRANGEWAYS PRISON: FIRST REPORTS

MANCHESTER MARTYRS' PRISON RECORDS

PRESS REACTION TO THE MANCHESTER EXECUTIONS PART I

PART II

PART III

WHAT  DID HAPPEN TO THE REMAINS OF THE PRISONERS EXECUTED AT MANCHESTER?

THE MANCHESTER FELONY REGISTER Pt 1

PART 2

PART 3

PART 4

GREATER MANCHESTER RIOTS IN 1868

MANCHESTER AND LANCASHIRE STRAYS IN MILL BANK PRISON

MANCHESTER POOR LAW AND WORKHOUSE RECORDS

MANCHESTER POOR LAW UNION MINUTES

CHORLTON AND SOUTH MANCHESTER REGISTRATION DISTRICT

VOTING REGISTERS AND ELIGIBILITY IN MANCHESTER

1831 POPULATION FIGURES FOR MANCHESTER

MANCHESTER CENSUS COLLECTION DETAILS

PLACES OF WORSHIP IN MANCHESTER AND SALFORD

MANCHESTER PARISH AND CITY

MANCHESTER CITY CENTRE CHURCHES

MANCHESTER AND GENERAL INFORMATION

MANCHESTER BOROUGH POLICE FORCE

SECOND PART

THIRD PART

FOURTH PART

MANCHESTER INQUEST WITNESS STATEMENTS INDEX

TRANSPORT IN MANCHESTER PART ONE

PART TWO

THE RELOCATION OF MANCHESTER ARCHIVES

MFHR NEWS AND UPDATES

USEFUL LINKS

MANCHESTER FAMILY HISTORY CONTACT PAGE

 

   

  MANCHESTER CITY CENTRE CHURCHES

 

MANCHESTER CITY CENTRE CHURCHES

FOR one reason or another some of the City of Manchester's older churches and chapels have disappeared. Here I take a look at some of their images and briefly explain the reasons why some of them no longer exist. Also included are some  brief details of those that still survive.

ST JOHN'S, BYROM ST

ST JOHN'S  was built by Edward Byrom following an Act of Parliament in 1768. St John's parish was united with St Matthews, Campfield in 1928 when St Mathews became the parish church, but the St John's parsonage served as the  home for the clergy. St John's church was demolished in 1931. This new parish was united with St Ann's in 1943.

Courtesy of Manchester Archives and Local Studies
http://www.images.manchester.gov.uk/

THE MANCHESTER  COLLECTION

ST MARY'S, PARSONAGE

ST MARY'S was consecrated on September 29th 1756 after an Act of Parliament in 1753. It was closed in October 1890 and the parish was united with St Ann's to form the newly named parish of St Ann and St Mary.

Courtesy of Manchester Archives and Local Studies

   http://www.images.manchester.gov.uk/

 

ST PETER'S, MOSLEY ST

ST PETER'S Church was an impressive building. It was consecrated 6th September 1794.The impending closure of this church was the cause of some controversy.

In 1906 The Manchester Churches Act was passed by Parliament. In the preamble to the Act it is stated that with the conversion of dwelling houses to commercial properties in certain parishes in the City of Manchester population diminished and in other parishes increased. Which meant too many churches in parts of the city and visa versa.

A 1905 commission set up by the Bishop of Manchester came to the conclusion that St Peter, Mosley St, Saints Simon and Jude, Granby Row and St Martins Oldham Road be removed and sold, and the mentioned parishes be united with adjacent Parishes. This is exactly what the 1906 Act did.

At first Manchester Corporation were opposed to the proposed Act while it was still at the Bill stage. After sometime there was agreement between the Corporation and the Diocese of Manchester. These common points were then included in a revised Bill later the actual Act.

 

 Courtesy of Manchester Archives and Local Studies

   http://www.images.manchester.gov.uk/

   

The Act stated that St Peter's was to unify with St James's, George St and that the Corporation would purchase the church, vaults and attached land for 20,000 excluding all the valuable moveable objects such as the organ, font, altar, monuments, stained glass etc. The Diocese had to remove all these objects within 3 months of the Act coming in to law, otherwise they would become Corporation property.

For the Corporation's part they had to make an accurate plan of all the graves and vaults, together with transcriptions of all the readable monumental inscriptions. Then they had to cover and protect all the graves. The Corporation had to agree to demolish the church within twelve months of the passing of the Act. Furthermore, they had to agree that the land could only be used for the purposes of widening adjoining streets and as an open space for the benefit of the citizens of Manchester. They also agreed that a memorial to the church costing five hundred pounds would be erected on the site.

Manchester Corporation paid the money to the Manchester Diocese on July 19th 1907. In his book, A Short History Of Manchester and Salford, F A Bruton  puts it much more simply. At the bottom of Mosley St a graceful cross marks the dark pile of St Peter's Church, which was consecrated in 1794, but was found to block the traffic so seriously that it had to be removed.

In 1924 the Manchester War Memorial was constructed nearby to the Church Memorial. Originally it was to be located in Albert Square. In view of the recent news of the proposal to relocate the War Memorial, I thought it might be of some interest to transcribe the full agreement between the (then) Corporation and the Bishop of Manchester in 1906.

An Agreement made  the ninth day of April One thousand nine hundred and six  Between the Right Reverend Edmund Arbuthnott by Divine Permission Bishop of Manchester on behalf of himself and other Trustees of the Manchester Churches Act, 1906 named in the Bill for the said Act now pending in Parliament (which said Bishop and Trustees are hereinafter referred to as "the Trustees") of the one part and The Lord Mayor Aldermen and Citizens of the City of Manchester (thereinafter called the Corporation) of the other part Whereas the Bill hereinbefore referred to provides for the union of the Benefices of St Peter Moseley Street and St James' George Street in the City of Manchester and for the sale of the said Church of St Peter and the site thereof including the Vaults and land attached or belonging thereto and whereas the Corporation have presented a Petition on merits to the said House praying to be heard against the said Bill and that the same may not pass into law and whereas it has been agreed subject to confirmation by Parliament that the arrangements hereinafter contained should be made and that the Corporation should cause their Petition against and opposition to the said Bill to be withdrawn Now  therefore these present witness  and it is hereby agreed by and between the parties hereto as follows:

1. The Trustees shall sell and the Corporation shall purchase at the price of Twenty thousand pounds the said Church of St Peter and the site thereof and the lands attached thereto exclusive of any font holy table church plate lectern organ bell service book and monument therein and also exclusive of any other ornaments fittings and furniture therein including stained and painted glass which the Trustees may desire to remove.

2. As soon as may be after the passing of the Act the Trustees shall remove any font holy table church plate lectern organ bell service book and monument in the said Church of St Peter and also any other ornaments fittings and furniture therein which they may desire to remove but any such articles or things not removed within three months from the passing of the said Act shall be deemed part of the materials of the Church and belong to the Corporation . The Trustees shall also remove any stained or painted glass which they may desire to remove  but such removal shall not take place until after the Corporation have covered and protected the graves prior to removing the the buildings as hereinafter provided.

3. The Corporation shall wholly demolish the said Church of St Peter within twelve calendar months after the passing of the Act but in doing so shall not interfere with the graves or vaults therein save so far as may be necessary to allow of the same being carefully and properly covered and protected with soil or other suitable material. The materials of the Church and the proceeds of sale thereof shall belong to the Corporation.

4. Immediately after the demolition of the said Church the Corporation shall pay to the Trustees the said sum of Twenty thousand pounds and thereupon the site of the said Church and the land attached or belonging thereto shall vest in the Corporation and their successors for ever freed and discharged from all Ecclesiastical and other trust users purposes obligations disabilities and restrictions whatsoever and from all rights or interests of the owners of any seats or pews graves or vaults or of any other person and provision shall be made in the Bill for giving effect to this Clause and if necessary for vacating or negativing the consecration of the said Church and the site thereof.

5. The said site and land shall subject to the provisions of the following clause be used only for the purpose of widening the streets adjoining the same and as an open space for the benefit of the Citizens of Manchester and the same shall be kept in proper order and repair by the Corporation. The Bill shall provide for the application to the said site and land of the local acts of the Corporation with respect to Streets Open Spaces and Recreation Grounds.

6. The Corporation may if they so think fit and shall if so required by the said trustees erect upon the site of the said Church at a cost of Five hundred pounds such Cross or other Memorial of the said Church as may have been approved by the Bishop and the Trustees shall out of the said purchase money of Twenty thousand pounds pay to the Corporation the sum of Five hundred pounds as the cost of such Cross or other Memorial.

7. The Corporation shall cause  a correct plan to be made of the site of the said Church shewing by consecutive numbers the exact position of each grave and vault and shall further cause an index to be prepared giving an exact copy of every legible inscription upon the face of every gravestone in such Church by reference to the number on the said plan. A copy of such plan and index  engrossed on parchment and certified by the City Surveyor as correct shall be forthwith after the passing of the said Act lodged by the Corporation at the Diocesan Registry in Manchester.

8. Such additions and alterations shall be made in the Bill to give effect to the provisions of this Agreement as may be arranged between the Parliamentary Agents of the Trustees and the Corporation..

9. The Corporation will at such time as shall be arranged by the Parliamentary Agents of the Trustees and the Corporation cause their said Petition against and opposition to the said Bill to be withdrawn and shall if required consent to the confirmation of this Agreement by Parliament.

10. This Agreement is conditional on the same being confirmed by Parliament but is subject to alteration as Parliament may think fit to make therein but if the Committee on the Bill make any material alteration in this Agreement it shall be competent to either party hereto to withdraw the same.

In Witness whereupon the Bishop has hereunto set his hand and seal and the Corporation have caused their Common Seal to be hereunto affixed the day and year first before written.

Find My Past

ST AUGUSTINE'S R C, GRANBY ROW

 

St Augustine's RC Church has had a very chequered history. Its first location was Granby Row, but with a combination of the 1906 Open Spaces Act and the 1908 Manchester Corporation Act it was removed to York St, Chorlton-on-Medlock, becoming the major Roman Catholic church in the area. In December 1940 Enemy Action reduced the church to a shell, no pun intended. However the Parish Church did rise again but in another location over looking where All Saints used to stand. The church was not built until 1968 before the church was dedicated, once again, to St Augustine.

Manchester Archives has a collection of photographs recording the exhumations of the coffins from St Augustine's Cemetery (GB127.BR f 718.094273). The pictures range from 3rd March 1909 to 22nd Sept 1909. I am not sure how long the work took but it was a gruesome task undertaken by men using shovels and picks. One picture shows twenty four men at the scene, two of they them appear to be overseers, dressed slightly more smartly than the others. Another one shows thirty one men working. The original prints are obviously in black and white, but a very crude attempt has been made to add colour to some of the images. The coffins are packed very close together both vertically and horizontally.

Courtesy of Manchester Archives and Local Studies

 http://www.images.manchester.gov.uk/

 

COOPER STREET CALVANISTIC METHODIST (formerly Oak Street)

Baptism records exist for this chapel from 1803 to 1837.

 

CROSS STREET PRESBYTERIAN

Records dating back to 1712 have survived for this chapel. An image can be seen here.

 

GROSVENOR STREET INDEPENDENT, PICCADILLY

Baptisms from this chapel have survived from 1795. An image can be seen here.

 

MOSELEY STREET INDEPENDENT

Another source of early records dating from 1795. This particular building was demolished in 1848. See here.

 

OLDHAM ROAD CONGREATIONAL

A very good collection of records survive from 1853. Image.

 

OLDHAM STREET METHODIST NEW CONNEXION

Baptismal records from 1800 still exist. See here.

 

ST CLEMENT, LEVER STREET.

Records of baptisms have survived from 1793.

 

ST GEORGE, OLDHAM ROAD

A very good collection of records have survived from 1798. An image can be seen here.

 

ST GEORGE'S ROAD BAPTIST

Records from 1777 to 1836 still exist.

 

ST JAMES, GEORGE STREET

Baptism and marriage records from 1798 to 1928  (when the church closed) survive. See here.

 

ST MARTIN, GERMAN STREET

Baptisms records from 1865 and marriage records from 1874 survive.

 

ST MATTHEW, CAMPFIELD

A good collection of records have survived from 1826. Images can be found on the web.

 

ST PAUL, NEW CROSS

Another good set of records for this church have survived. Baptisms start from 1765 and marriages from 1838. See here for an image.

 

MANCHESTER CATHEDRAL

 

The Collegiate and Parish Church of Manchester, as it was known before being elevated to cathedral status, is Manchester's oldest church. Further details about the history of this church and parish can be seen here. Images of the church can be seen on the Manchester computerised images Collection. One early example is here.

 

ST ANN'S

St Ann's was built in Acres Field. Construction began in 1709 and the church was consecrated in 1712. It was a Low Church as opposed to the High Church Collegiate Church. Its congregation tended towards the Whigs. A district was not assigned to St Ann's until September 1838. Early baptisms and burials i.e. up to 1736 were recorded in the Collegiate Church registers. The same applied to marriages before May 1838. St Ann's church steeple was badly damaged by an earthquake in 1777 and was removed shortly after.

St Ann's Square 1741

Courtesy of Manchester Archives and Local Studies

   http://www.images.manchester.gov.uk/

 

CENTRAL HALL, OLDHAM STREET (formerly Oldham Street Wesleyan)

This is point of the Methodists Church in the area. The Manchester and Salford Wesleyan Methodist Mission was founded in 1886 and was based at the new Central Hall in Manchester, which had been built on the site of Oldham Street Chapel. Under  Revd. Samuel Collier, the Mission became a highly successful centre for evangelical work. Central Hall could not accommodate all those wanting to attend the Sunday services, so the Mission started holding services in the Free Trade Hall - resulting in some of the largest Methodist congregations ever. These services continued until 1910, when they were moved to the newly built Albert Mission Hall in Peter Street. The Mission also tried to reach the non-church-going public by holding Saturday night concerts, open-air services and midnight missions. The Mission took over certain 'derelict' causes and transformed them into mission halls - so, for example, the Great Bridgewater Street society became Bridgewater Hall in Hulme, the Irwell Street society became Irwell Hall. One image of Central hall can be viewed here.

Over the years the hall has been used for many non religious activities. I attended Central Hall on many occasions for Quarterly Members Meetings of the  Manchester Central Branch of Natsopa, later SOGAT 82. This was one on the Print Unions.

ST MARY, MULBERRY STREET (Roman Catholic)

Affectionately know as the Hidden Gem, this is the oldest surviving Catholic Church in the city. A beautifully ornate church, although more the size of a large chapel. For a brief history of the church see this link. Eighteen images can be seen on the Images Collection. This is is just one of them.

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Copyright: Gerard Lodge (www.manchester-family-history-research.co.uk) 2007-2014

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Last update: 1st January 2014